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Ira Gershwin

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1992 | DON HECKMAN, Don Heckman writes frequently about music for The Times. and
How's this for a musical comedy theme? The United States declares war on Switzerland when the tiny European nation protests a 50% tariff on the price of imported cheese. The conflict becomes a major tourist attraction, with its expenses paid for by the biggest U.S. cheese manufacturer. Satirical? You bet. A topical anti-war show? Anti-war, yes; topical--not exactly, at least not for more than 60 years.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2014 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Depending on your knowledge of the material and expectations going in, the touring version of "The Gershwins' Porgy and Bess," which opened Wednesday at the Ahmanson Theatre, might be either an ingenious, audience-friendly re-creation or a bastardization of this classic American show. Both perspectives can reside within the same spectator, as they do within me, one alternately gaining the upper hand over the other. Undeniable, however, is the majesty of the score, which begins after the Overture with "Summertime" and keeps soaring with "My Man's Gone Now," "Bess, You Is My Woman Now" and "I Loves You, Porgy.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2009 | Mike Boehm
The heirs of George and Ira Gershwin, creators of "I Got Rhythm" and many other standards that helped define the grand tradition of American popular song, have fallen badly out of step over who gets how much from the lucrative pot of royalties still being generated 72 years after George's death ended songwriting's greatest brother act. The dispute -- over how to divide foreign royalties -- is spelled out in lawsuits in separate Los Angeles courts....
OPINION
October 2, 2013
Re "History lost in Beverly Hills," Sept. 28 The pros and cons of forcing property owners in Beverly Hills to use their homes as outdoor museum exhibits by enacting more stringent historical preservation laws made the front page Sunday. The L.A. area has numerous museums for art, history, science, cars and even old houses, all of which are supported by taxpayers or private groups. If the city of Beverly Hills or preservationist groups want to buy houses to use as museums, that is their choice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2013 | By Martha Groves
In most places, an 8,100-square-foot house with five bedrooms, six baths and a swimming pool that had been remodeled by a master architect would be considered the height of luxury. And if Ira Gershwin had penned lyrics for such standards as "The Man That Got Away" during the decades he lived there, all the better. Not so much in Beverly Hills, a city of stratospherically priced property, where many residents prefer to build their castles from scratch - and have the scratch to build exactly what they want.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 1986
I was dismayed to see that Donna Perlmutter omitted any mention of Ira Gershwin in her glowing review of Sarah Vaughan's recent performances at Hollywood Bowl ("Vaughan's Rhapsody in Gershwin," July 14). I'm sure she'd be the first to agree that Vaughan would not have delivered with "astonishing wit, imagination and musicality" if she had just hummed George Gershwin's music and not sung Ira Gershwin's musical lyrics. How about giving credit where credit is overdue! BARBARA FREED SALTZMAN Malibu
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1993
I was pleased that the Betty Clooney Foundation's Singers' Salute to the Songwriter was covered by Don Heckman ("Singers Salute Songwriters--at Length," April 22). It was a terrific evening and the money raised from this event goes to a wonderful program. I must note, however, that "Of Thee I Sing" (sung in the concert by Marilyn Lovell) was written by George and Ira Gershwin, and not Irving Berlin, to whom it was attributed in the review. MARK TRENT GOLDBERG Executive Director Ira & Leonore Gershwin Trusts Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2005 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Mark Trent Goldberg, who managed the archive of Broadway composers George and Ira Gershwin and was executive director of the Ira and Leonore Gershwin Trusts, a major supporter of the music division of the Library of Congress, has died. He was 49. Goldberg died May 18 in his office in San Francisco after suffering a heart attack, said Michael Strunsky, trustee of the Ira and Leonore Gershwin Trusts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2011 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
People were always telling Bruce Lloyd Kates that the song he had written had a Gershwin-like sound to it. Kates, a piano tuner and composer, took that as a compliment. After all, he's a huge fan of George and Ira Gershwin's work and of 1930s-era music in general. The Los Feliz resident wrote "Some Time to Get to Know You" in the early 1990s and copyrighted it in 2002. It wasn't until later that it dawned on Kates why his tune seems so Gershwin-esque: It came from George Gershwin's piano.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1999
Daryl H. Miller would have us believe that Moss Hart collaborated with George Gershwin and Kurt Weill on "Lady in the Dark" ("Like Father, Like Son? Sort Of," Oct. 17). That would have been an amazing collaboration since George was dead at the time. Please, Mr. Miller, Ira Gershwin. And Jan Breslauer, discussing "Crimes of the Heart" ("Following His Heart," Oct. 17), tells us that the three sisters were awaiting news about their dying father. It was their grandfather who was dying.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2013 | By Martha Groves
In most places, an 8,100-square-foot house with five bedrooms, six baths and a swimming pool that had been remodeled by a master architect would be considered the height of luxury. And if Ira Gershwin had penned lyrics for such standards as "The Man That Got Away" during the decades he lived there, all the better. Not so much in Beverly Hills, a city of stratospherically priced property, where many residents prefer to build their castles from scratch - and have the scratch to build exactly what they want.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2013 | By Susan King
"Danny Kaye and Sylvia Fine: Two Kids From Brooklyn," currently ensconced at Walt Disney Concert Hall's Ira Gershwin Gallery through Feb. 23, is a treasure trove of lyric sheets, performance materials, scripts, correspondence, business papers, posters, videos and recordings chronicling the lives and careers of the legendary comic actor and his composer wife. The Disney Hall space, a satellite gallery of the Library of Congress, is open to anyone attending a performance or on a free docent-led tour or a self-guided audio tour of the building.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2013 | By David C. Nichols
The magic of the Gershwin songbook swept the Los Angeles County Arboretum on Saturday, when Michael Feinstein and the Pasadena Pops Orchestra, together with guest vocalists Catherine Russell and Tom Wopat, closed the 2013 season in glossy, old-school fashion. Although the evening, which coincided with Feinstein's birthday, concluded the Grammy nominee's debut summer as principal conductor, you'd hardly have guessed it. From preshow appearance, receiving a spontaneous rendition of “Happy Birthday” by orchestra and audience, to final “surprise encore we have planned,” Feinstein wielded his baton and anecdotal commentary with an assurance that suggested decades of pops podium tactics.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2013 | By Christopher Smith
By George, half a century on it's still a good thing when Gershwin music is front and center. During the next few days two Southern California orchestras are turning their focus to brothers George and Ira. On Saturday, Michael Feinstein conducts the Pasadena Pops in what promises to be a delve-deep inside their canon. Then Tuesday, the Los Angeles Philharmonic's program at the Hollywood Bowl features two of George Gershwin's orchestral scores, “Cuban Overture” and “Porgy and Bess: A Symphonic Picture.” Gershwin music played by local orchestras taps into a very poignant moment in Southern California music history.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2013 | By David Ng
Michael Feinstein will be bringing his brand of class and oomph to the Pasadena Pops for three more years. The musician and orchestra have renewed his contract as the group's principal pops conductor through 2016. Feinstein kicked off his first season with the Pasadena Pops this summer, leading the orchestra in June at the Los Angeles County Arboretum in a performance that featured Cheyenne Jackson. The next performance will be Saturday with a program dedicated to classic MGM movies (and their music)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2013 | By Christopher Smith
When the Pasadena Pops kicks off its summer season of concerts at the L.A. County Arboretum in Arcadia on Saturday, it will be led by a music director and conductor who has never even played in an orchestra, much less conducted one. It's a risky move certainly, but a shrewd one as well. The hiring of Michael Feinstein - on the heels of songwriter and veteran conductor Marvin Hamlisch's death last summer - taps the musicality, as well as the popularity, of a performer who has helped resuscitate popular American music from almost a century ago into a vital and active art form.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2008 | From a Times staff writer
Stevie Wonder has been chosen to receive the second Library of Congress Gershwin Prize for Popular Song, created to recognize a musician whose lifetime work "exemplifies the standard of excellence" associated with legendary songwriters George and Ira Gershwin. "The Gershwin Prize was created to honor an artist whose creative output transcends distinctions between musical styles and idioms, bringing diverse listeners together and fostering mutual understanding and appreciation. Stevie Wonder's music epitomizes this ideal," said Librarian of Congress James H. Billington.
NEWS
April 26, 1990 | BILL HIGGINS
It was the sweet harmony between song and charity that raised $500,000 for the Betty Clooney Foundation for Persons With Brain Injury on Tuesday night. The concert, chaired by Rosalind Wyman and produced by Allen Sviridoff at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, was the fifth annual Singers Salute to the Songwriter, a veritable love-fest between vocalists and composers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2013 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
Carole King has amassed some impressive accolades in her storied five-decade career. Now she can add the Library of Congress Gershwin Prize for Popular Song to her mantle. The prolific singer-songwriter was feted with the songwriting award - named after American composers George and Ira Gershwin - at a White House concert Wednesday night. President Obama presented the 71-year-old with this year's award during a tribute concert for the singer in the East Room of the White House.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2011 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
People were always telling Bruce Lloyd Kates that the song he had written had a Gershwin-like sound to it. Kates, a piano tuner and composer, took that as a compliment. After all, he's a huge fan of George and Ira Gershwin's work and of 1930s-era music in general. The Los Feliz resident wrote "Some Time to Get to Know You" in the early 1990s and copyrighted it in 2002. It wasn't until later that it dawned on Kates why his tune seems so Gershwin-esque: It came from George Gershwin's piano.
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