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Ira M Heyman

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NEWS
April 7, 1989 | Special to The Times
Seeking to put to rest a five-year dispute, UC Berkeley Chancellor Ira Michael Heyman apologized Thursday for admissions policies that caused a recent decline in Asian undergraduate enrollment and pledged to help change those entrance requirements. "It is clear that decisions made in the admissions process indisputably had a disproportionate impact on Asians," Heyman said at a press conference here with leaders of the local Asian community. "That outcome was the product of insensitivity.
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NEWS
May 26, 1994 | From Associated Press
Ira Michael Heyman, a lawyer and former chancellor of UC Berkeley, was named Wednesday to the post of secretary of the Smithsonian Institution. It marked the first time in the 148-year history of the institution that a non-scientist was chosen as the chief executive officer. The vote of the Smithsonian's 17-member board of regents "finally was unanimous," said Barber Conable, head of the search committee.
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NEWS
January 27, 1988 | LARRY GORDON, Times Education Writer
UC Berkeley Chancellor Ira Michael Heyman apologized Tuesday for what he said was the overly defensive way his administration reacted to allegations of anti-Asian discrimination in freshman admissions procedures. Heyman stressed that he was not conceding that campus officials, as Asian civil rights activists charge, try to limit the number of Asian freshmen.
NEWS
July 21, 1989 | LARRY GORDON, Times Education Writer
UC Berkeley Chancellor Ira Michael Heyman, who has led that prestigious and argumentative campus since 1980, announced Thursday that he will resign next year and return to teaching law and city planning. Heyman, 59, said he is resigning "to regain the sense of perspective you have as a faculty member." Including his six previous years as vice chancellor, Heyman will have been a top administrator for 16 years and that, he said, "is a long time at a place like Berkeley."
NEWS
July 21, 1989 | LARRY GORDON, Times Education Writer
UC Berkeley Chancellor Ira Michael Heyman, who has led that prestigious and argumentative campus since 1980, announced Thursday that he will resign next year and return to teaching law and city planning. Heyman, 59, said he is resigning "to regain the sense of perspective you have as a faculty member." Including his six previous years as vice chancellor, Heyman will have been a top administrator for 16 years and that, he said, "is a long time at a place like Berkeley."
NEWS
May 26, 1994 | From Associated Press
Ira Michael Heyman, a lawyer and former chancellor of UC Berkeley, was named Wednesday to the post of secretary of the Smithsonian Institution. It marked the first time in the 148-year history of the institution that a non-scientist was chosen as the chief executive officer. The vote of the Smithsonian's 17-member board of regents "finally was unanimous," said Barber Conable, head of the search committee.
NEWS
March 22, 1985 | JENNINGS PARROTT
--Esther Snyder was certified by the Civil Service Commission to be one of 100 police cadets that Cleveland plans to hire. Snyder, 64, a retired teacher and a grandmother of four, says she wants to become a police officer even if forced to retire again when she reaches 65 because she'd rather be a "productive worker" than stay home collecting a pension.
NEWS
September 24, 1986 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
Philippine President Corazon Aquino was cheered on both sides of San Francisco Bay on Tuesday as she made the final stop in her United States tour here in one of the nation's largest Filipino-American communities. She was greeted by hotel maids, elementary school students, politicians and university educators. Only a smattering of protesters showed up, some claiming that she is too soft on Communists while others claimed that she has gone too far to the political right.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1986 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Education Writer
Outside the student store on the UCLA campus sits a wooden shanty, a symbol of the oppression of blacks in South Africa. On its side, in bold letters, is a sign that says, "We will not rest till they divest." Students at UCLA and at other campuses have recently renewed their drive to force universities to sell their stock in American firms that do business in South Africa. But inside the student-run complex, the campus store does a brisk business in the products of these same American firms.
NEWS
September 2, 1988 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
Luis W. Alvarez, who won the 1968 Nobel Prize in physics for his work on the fundamental particles of the universe, but who became much better known for his controversial theory that the dinosaurs became extinct after an asteroid collided with Earth, died Wednesday night at the age of 77. His wife, Janet, said his health had been in decline since he underwent surgery last fall for a benign brain tumor. After the surgery, he developed cancer of the esophagus.
NEWS
April 7, 1989 | Special to The Times
Seeking to put to rest a five-year dispute, UC Berkeley Chancellor Ira Michael Heyman apologized Thursday for admissions policies that caused a recent decline in Asian undergraduate enrollment and pledged to help change those entrance requirements. "It is clear that decisions made in the admissions process indisputably had a disproportionate impact on Asians," Heyman said at a press conference here with leaders of the local Asian community. "That outcome was the product of insensitivity.
NEWS
January 27, 1988 | LARRY GORDON, Times Education Writer
UC Berkeley Chancellor Ira Michael Heyman apologized Tuesday for what he said was the overly defensive way his administration reacted to allegations of anti-Asian discrimination in freshman admissions procedures. Heyman stressed that he was not conceding that campus officials, as Asian civil rights activists charge, try to limit the number of Asian freshmen.
NEWS
April 25, 1985 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Anti-apartheid protesters from dozens of college campuses across the nation Wednesday boycotted classes, marched, rallied or spoke in support of a "day of action" opposing American support of the racist policies of South Africa. More than 300 people were arrested, including 25 who had camped outside the office of UC Davis Chancellor James H. Meyer. Seventy-five students received citations at UC Santa Barbara when they refused to leave an administration building.
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