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Iran Population

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NEWS
May 10, 1998 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jalal Shahpasand, a tall, husky restaurateur, waited until after dinner and the chaperons had gone off to watch television. After courting "the lovely Jila" for a year, he was ready. So he took her hand and softly asked, "Will you marry me?" Jila nodded. Javad Goudarzi, a handsome plastics worker with a thick mustache, chose the traditional route to marriage: family arrangement. When he met 19-year-old Theahereh the first time, he decided that she was the girl for him.
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NEWS
May 10, 1998 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jalal Shahpasand, a tall, husky restaurateur, waited until after dinner and the chaperons had gone off to watch television. After courting "the lovely Jila" for a year, he was ready. So he took her hand and softly asked, "Will you marry me?" Jila nodded. Javad Goudarzi, a handsome plastics worker with a thick mustache, chose the traditional route to marriage: family arrangement. When he met 19-year-old Theahereh the first time, he decided that she was the girl for him.
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NEWS
November 7, 1986 | Associated Press
A new census shows that Iran's population has grown by more than 3.5% in 10 years and that about half of the 48.2 million people are younger than 15, Iran's official Islamic Republic News Agency reported Thursday.
NEWS
November 7, 1986 | Associated Press
A new census shows that Iran's population has grown by more than 3.5% in 10 years and that about half of the 48.2 million people are younger than 15, Iran's official Islamic Republic News Agency reported Thursday.
NEWS
June 2, 1989 | From Times wire service s
President Ali Khamenei today told his countrymen that they can no longer use Islam as a justification for increasing the country's population at the rate of five children per minute. The official news agency IRNA quoted Khamenei as saying that the Prophet Mohammed initially encouraged his followers to have more children to help spread Islamic civilization, since there were under 100,000 people in the Arabian Peninsula at the outset of Islam. "But this does not mean that for the rest of history every Muslim family is obliged to have 8, 10, or 12 kids," Khamenei said.
OPINION
February 20, 2000
Recently, I attended a seminar on Cuba today. Reading Shireen Hunter's analysis of contemporary Iran ("Don't Expect Things to Change Overnight," Commentary, Feb. 14) gave me a shock of recognition. Both Cuba and Iran have population majorities born since their respective revolutions. Those young people are largely uninterested in the ideals that drove the revolutions; they have been attracted to a transnational material culture inescapable in a media-saturated world. Old revolutionaries, of all people, should know that you can't freeze time or stop history by fiat--but somehow, they never seem to learn.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2009 | Liesl Bradner
Journalist and photographer Iason Athanasiadis has set out to alter how Westerners perceive Iran with his photo exhibition "Exploring the Other: Contemporary Iran" at L.A.'s Craft and Folk Art Museum, today through March 29. "I wanted to use this opportunity to show how varied Iran is -- what it's really like," said Athanasiadis. "A lot of people don't know that Iran is the birthplace of the most lenient form of Islam." Now based in Tehran, Athanasiadis was born and raised in Athens.
OPINION
February 10, 2006 | Edward N. Luttwak, EDWARD N. LUTTWAK is a senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington.
THERE MAY BE good reasons to oppose an air attack on Iran's nuclear installations at this time, but one of the arguments that is advanced most often is seriously flawed. The argument is based on a familiar axiom that ruling regimes, even unpopular ones, are strengthened by such attacks because the bombarded nation rallies around its rulers. But this does not apply to Iran.
WORLD
February 7, 2013 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Alexandra Sandels, Los Angeles Times
TEHRAN - Thirty-eight-year-old Reza Ali Mohammadi, a typist, and his wife, who stays at home, recently had their second son and wouldn't mind having a larger family. But when he sees the price of Pampers at a grocery store, it knocks some sense into him. He can barely afford one package of diapers a week, the prices are so high. Mohammadi represents a worrisome trend to the Iranian government: More young couples are wary of having babies in the climate of economic instability caused by international sanctions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1985
In war, desperation leads to escalation. Three weeks ago Iraq broke an eight-month-old agreement negotiated under U.N. auspices and sent its air force to attack Iranian cities. Iran immediately responded by firing rockets at urban areas in Iraq. So far as is known, no military targets have been hit in these exchanges, and probably none have even been seriously aimed at. The expansion of the war has instead been a deliberately indiscriminate effort to terrorize and demoralize civilians.
NEWS
March 3, 1988 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
Iraq said Wednesday that it fired two missiles into Qom, a city regarded as holy by Iran's Shia Muslims and a site not previously attacked with missiles. Tehran Radio said that Qom, about 75 miles southwest of Tehran, had been hit by one missile. It said there were no casualties. The broadcast said that Iranian forces, in retaliation, fired three missiles at Baghdad, Iraq's capital. Qom is a center of religious learning and was home for decades to the Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, Iran's leader.
NEWS
October 16, 1987 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
An Iranian missile set fire to an American-owned supertanker Thursday in coastal waters near Kuwait's main oil-exporting terminal. The missile attack increased tension in the northern Persian Gulf, already running high after two American strikes against Iranian patrol craft. Although it could not be confirmed, Kuwaiti officials said they were convinced that the Iranians had fired a Silkworm anti-ship missile from the Faw Peninsula below Abadan, which they captured from Iraq in February, 1985.
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