Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsIran
IN THE NEWS

Iran

WORLD
April 7, 2014 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Paul Richter
TEHRAN - When Iran's leaders signed a preliminary nuclear deal with world powers in November, they promised the six-month agreement would quickly start "melting the iceberg" of Western sanctions, lead to new trade ties and lift the lives of ordinary Iranians. Opponents of the deal in the United States and the Middle East said much the same thing, warning that it would rapidly erode the international sanctions that have crippled Iran's economy. It hasn't worked out that way. More than four months into the deal, many Iranians think the interim accord has done little to help them.
Advertisement
WORLD
March 27, 2014 | By Christi Parsons, Kathleen Hennessey and Laura King
ROME - After spending four days in Europe dealing with the crisis over Russia's annexation of Crimea, President Obama now turns to a diplomatic challenge of another sort: trying to smooth relations with Saudi Arabia without making the longtime U.S. ally seem like an afterthought. Obama is scheduled to arrive in Riyadh, the Saudi capital, shortly before sunset Friday to meet with King Abdullah, whose inner circle is riled by how the United States has handled Iran's nuclear ambitions and Syria's civil war. Some with close ties to the royal family have talked about breaking ranks with Western partners.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2014 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Lawrence E. Walsh, a former federal judge and Wall Street lawyer who spent a frustrating seven years as the independent counsel investigating misconduct by Reagan administration officials in the Iran-Contra affair, died Wednesday at his home in Oklahoma City after a short illness, his family said. He was 102. Walsh undertook the controversial job when he was 75 and semi-retired from a career that began in the mid-1930s, when he prosecuted racketeering in New York City. The Republican later was appointed to the federal bench, served as president of the American Bar Assn., and was No. 2 in President Eisenhower's Justice Department before spending two decades with the powerful law firm of Davis, Polk & Wardwell.
OPINION
March 19, 2014 | By Andrew Cockburn
In 1919, after allied sanctions on food shipments had starved the Kaiser's Germany into submission, President Wilson endorsed the continued use of sanctions to settle international disputes as an "economic, peaceful, silent, deadly remedy. " Almost a century later, the weapon is more popular than ever, mostly because of a wholly mistaken belief that it makes the targets do what we want. Currently, the United States is enforcing no fewer than 24 separate sanctions regimes directed at targets ranging from the Balkans to Zimbabwe.
NATIONAL
March 16, 2014 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - The CIA's chief of Iran operations was placed on paid administrative leave and sent home from agency headquarters after an internal investigation found he had created an abusive and hostile work environment that put a crucial division in disarray, according to current and former officials. Officers and analysts in the Iran operations division, which coordinates spying on Iran and its nuclear program, were informed at a meeting last week at CIA headquarters in Langley, Va., of the decision to suspend Jonathan Bank, a veteran officer and member of the senior intelligence service.
WORLD
March 15, 2014 | By Ramin Mostaghim, Alexandra Sandels and Patrick J. McDonnell
TEHRAN - The room at the Iranian Chamber of Commerce offices was packed and noisy. At the lectern, Deputy Foreign Minister Abbas Araqchi encouraged dozens of merchants and manufacturers to "seize the opportunity" that could result from an easing of international sanctions. Businessmen who for years have been largely excluded from the global marketplace debated over ways to reach out to prospective investors. "Why not send a delegation of businessmen to the U.S. Congress?" proposed Mahmoud Daneshmand, a veteran import-export man. The deputy foreign minister, grasping the impracticality of that suggestion, responded in diplomat-speak: "Well, for the time being, the conditions are not right.
SPORTS
March 14, 2014 | By David Wharton
The Russian coach did not want to talk about troops on the Crimean peninsula or any other aspect of his country's conflict with Ukraine. Speaking through an interpreter, Christakis Alexandridis preferred to focus on his wrestlers and their chances in an international championship at the Forum this weekend. “Our politics is wrestling,” he said. But current events cannot help but intrude on the 42nd FILA Freestyle World Cup, not with a Saturday schedule featuring two politically charged matches.
WORLD
March 10, 2014 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM - -Blue seas, red mountains and green rockets set the stage for Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Monday as he launched a fierce critique of the international community, which he accused of hypocrisy regarding Iran and a double standard toward Israel. The country's top political and military ranks, as well as international diplomats and media, traveled to Israel's southernmost city of Eilat for the display of the weapons seized from the Klos-C, a Panamanian-registered ship intercepted by Israel's navy near Sudan last week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2014 | By Kate Linthicum
In a speech to Jewish leaders in Los Angeles on Thursday, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu drew parallels between Nazi Germany and Iran, warning of dire consequences if anti-Jewish rhetoric is allowed to go unchecked. "There is a regime today that calls daily for our annihilation, openly and unabashedly," Netanyahu told a crowd of several hundred people gathered at the Museum of Tolerance, which houses Holocaust-related materials. "Our principal lesson in history is that when someone says they're going to annihilate you, take them seriously.
WORLD
February 20, 2014 | By Patrick J. McDonnell and Ramin Mostaghim
BEIRUT -- High-level talks concerning the future of Iran's controversial nuclear program got off to a “good start” during a three-day opening session in Vienna, participants said Thursday, though there were no major breakthroughs. “We had three fruitful and extensive working days and both sides have the feeling that it was a good start for the difficult task we have ahead,” Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif told reporters in Vienna, reported Tehran's official Press TV. Similar upbeat comments came from Catherine Ashton, the European Community's foreign policy chief.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|