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WORLD
February 2, 2014 | By David Willman, This post has been corrected. See note at the bottom for details.
WASHINGTON - Hillary Rodham Clinton is backing President Obama's opposition to new economic sanctions against Iran. Obama announced in his State of the Union address last week that he would veto any legislation that called for such sanctions, as negotiations to extend an interim nuclear weapons agreement proceed. Some prominent Republicans support new sanctions. Clinton, the former secretary of State and presumed early frontrunner for the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination, detailed her position in a Jan. 26 letter to the chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, Democrat Carl Levin of Michigan.
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WORLD
January 27, 2014 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - The interim nuclear deal between Iran and world powers will allow Tehran to continue far more research and development on centrifuges to enrich uranium than has been publicly recognized, according to a veteran Washington nuclear analyst. In a new report, David Albright, president of the nonpartisan Institute for Science and International Security, said the deal may delay development of new centrifuges at the Natanz uranium enrichment facility that haven't yet been fed with uranium hexaflouride, a compound used to produce nuclear fuel.
OPINION
January 26, 2014 | Doyle McManus
The most important person in the U.S.-Iran nuclear negotiations right now may be Harry Reid, the Senate Democratic leader from Searchlight, Nev. Two weeks ago, President Obama's nuclear diplomacy was in trouble, but not because of anything Iran was doing. The problems were domestic. A Senate bill proposing new economic sanctions against Tehran had swiftly gathered 59 supporters, a solid majority and only one vote short of the number needed to prevent a filibuster. The bill's backers, including the American Israel Public Affairs Committee, the powerful pro-Israel lobbying organization, were pressing for a quick vote in the Senate.
WORLD
January 25, 2014 | Paul Richter
Five years after President Obama vowed to expand U.S. relations with the Arab world and the broader Middle East, his administration is under fire from allies worried that the United States is scaling back its historic role as a power broker and peacemaker despite growing turmoil across the region. With a bitter power struggle intensifying between Iran and Saudi Arabia and widening crises in Syria, Iraq, Libya and Egypt, Washington's relative lack of influence and involvement has become a diplomatic problem and may be contributing to a growing threat from Islamic extremists, diplomats say. Senior officials in Saudi Arabia, Turkey and Israel all have complained about what they view as an American retrenchment after the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, with some leaders already beginning to chart policies more independent of Washington than in the past.
WORLD
January 21, 2014 | By Kate Linthicum, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
JERUSALEM -- At a cafe in Jerusalem, Giora Shamis greeted the announcement that Iran has begun rolling back its nuclear program with a shake of his head. “I feel deep anxiety,” said Shamis, who runs a hawkish news analysis website. “I don't believe a word they say. Iran's influence is on the march and Israel's strategic position is shrinking. I ask myself now, 'Who is calling the shots in the Middle East?'” While much of the world watched with cautious optimism as an interim deal designed to limit Iran's enrichment of uranium went into effect Monday, the tone in Israel was one of resigned skepticism.
WORLD
January 13, 2014 | Paul Richter
Iran and six world powers have agreed on a plan to launch the first phase of their nuclear deal, U.S. and Iranian officials announced Sunday, a sign the fragile international effort to curb Tehran's nuclear ambitions remains on track. The agreement, worked out in a month of talks between technical experts and diplomats, goes into effect Jan. 20, after which Iran will begin to get access to some of its frozen assets -- and will have to open more of its facilities to the United Nations' nuclear watchdog agency.
WORLD
January 13, 2014 | By Paul Richter, This post has been updated. See note below for details.
WASHINGTON - Key elements of a new nuclear agreement between Iran and six world powers are contained in an informal, 30-page text not yet publicly acknowledged by Western officials, Iran's chief negotiator said Monday. Abbas Araqchi disclosed the existence of the document in a Persian-language interview with the semiofficial Iranian Students News Agency. The new agreement, announced over the weekend, sets out a timetable for how Iran and the six nations, led by the United States, will implement a deal reached in November that is aimed at restraining Iran's nuclear ambitions.
WORLD
January 12, 2014 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON -- Iran and six world powers said Sunday they have agreed on a plan of implementation for their first-phase nuclear deal, a sign the fragile effort to curb Tehran's nuclear ambitions remains on track. The implementation agreement, worked out in a month of talks between technical experts and diplomats, will lay out how the group will carry out their plan to limit Iran's nuclear progress while they try to negotiate a long-term agreement. Officials of the United States, Iran and the European Union hailed the agreement as another step forward.
OPINION
January 12, 2014 | Doyle McManus
The first war I covered as a foreign correspondent was the civil war in Lebanon. When the conflict began in 1975, it was just a series of skirmishes, a nasty but limited little war for control of a small nation. Then other countries got involved: Syria, Iraq, Libya and Israel. They supplied money and weapons to their favored factions, turning an internal struggle into a longer, more deadly proxy war in which outside powers fought one another through surrogates. Eventually even the United States sent troops, which is why 241 Americans died in a bombing in Beirut in 1983.
WORLD
January 2, 2014 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Carol J. Williams
TEHRAN -- Two deadly bombings in Beirut over the last week and the arrest of a fugitive Saudi militant in the Nov. 19 attack on Iran's embassy in the Lebanese capital reflect the escalating spillover of a proxy war in Syria. Iranian Shiite Muslims and rival Sunnis in Saudi Arabia have been battling for years for dominance in the Middle East. But the rivalry has intensified since May, when the Lebanon-based and Iranian-backed Hezbollah militia made clear it had intervened in Syria's civil war on the side of the embattled Shiite-aligned government.
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