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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 2009 | By Robert Faturechi
When 25-year-old Daniel Levian was killed in a 2008 drunk driving accident, news of the sudden loss jolted the city's tight-knit Iranian American community. Word spread at popular Westside eateries and synagogues, and through Persian-language radio. But a local nonprofit, started by family and friends after Levian's death, is taking a novel approach to turning the tragedy into something positive during the holiday season. The Lev Foundation, launched in August 2008, is distributing free $10 taxi vouchers online through the month of December -- a time when holiday festivities can lead to increased drunk driving.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | By Saba Hamedy
Wearing a dark blue traditional Iranian garment, Roxanna Ameri followed the rhythm of the music as she marched with others outfitted in festive shades of red, green and purple. Ameri, 18, was among hundreds of Iranians who flocked to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art last weekend for the sixth annual Iranian New Year celebration, hosted by the Farhang Foundation, a nonprofit that celebrates Iranian art and culture in Southern California. March 20 commemorates both the first day of spring and the Iranian holiday Nowruz, which translates to "new day. " The holiday, which ends Sunday in the U.S. and on Tuesday in Iran, is a time for Iranians across the globe to gather with family and friends to celebrate spring and the rebirth of nature.
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WORLD
October 17, 2010 | By Ramin Mostaghim, Los Angeles Times
An Orange County Iranian American businessman was released from prison Saturday after 30 months behind bars, family members have confirmed. Reza Taghavi, 71, left Tehran's notorious Evin Prison and reportedly plans to return to California within a week. The Tustin resident was never formally charged or tried but was accused of passing $200 to a monarchist group called Tondar, which Iran says has been behind terrorist attacks. Taghavi said he gave the money unknowingly. Taghavi's relatives in Tustin and the San Fernando Valley declined to comment Saturday, saying they didn't want to say anything until he was safely out of Iran.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2013 | By Irene Lacher
Iranian American actress Shohreh Aghdashloo, who earned an Oscar nomination for her performance in "House of Sand and Fog" (2003), writes about her life journey from Tehran under siege to Hollywood in her new memoir, "The Alley of Love and Yellow Jasmines," which hits bookstores on Tuesday. In your memoir, you write that your Oscar nomination made you proud to open the door for other Middle Eastern actors to get roles that aren't terrorists. How has that been going? I haven't played a terrorist since "24," and believe me, when I chose the role it wasn't because of its political background but [because]
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2012 | By Steve Hochman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Carl St.Clair, the music director and principal conductor of Orange Country's Pacific Symphony, was a bit taken aback at one of the programming choices for the 2012 edition of the organization's American Composers Festival. This year's theme is "Nowruz — Celebrating Spring," marking the Persian New Year and celebrating the prominent Iranian American community and its vast cultural legacy. There's a world premiere of an oratorio by Iranian American composer Richard Danielpour and collaborations between the symphony and Persian music troupe the Shams Ensemble.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2009 | Alexandra Zavis
Patriotic Persian music blasted from the car that led thousands of demonstrators down Westwood Boulevard one recent afternoon, past Persian restaurants and bookstores. A plane hired by a local Persian TV station streaked overhead, flying a banner proclaiming: "We support freedom in Iran."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2009 | Raja Abdulrahim and Alexandra Zavis
Several months ago, Pouneh, a 24-year-old Iranian American college student, announced to her father that she would be voting for opposition candidate Mir-Hossein Mousavi in the Iranian presidential election. After Mousavi lost, she joined thousands of demonstrators in Westwood calling the results a fraud. Avesta, her 70-year-old father, shakes his head over what he sees as his daughter's youthful naivete.
WORLD
May 15, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
American journalist Roxana Saberi, who was convicted on the charge of spying, left Iran early today. Saberi's lawyer, Abdolsamad Khorramshahi, said the 32-year-old dual Iranian American citizen had left for Europe, but he did not say which country. She was freed Monday after an appeals court reduced her sentence from eight years to a two-year suspended sentence.
NEWS
November 29, 1987 | BETTY MAHMOODY and WILLIAM HOFFER, From " Not Without My Daughter ," by Betty Mahmoody with William Hoffer. Copyright 1987, Betty Mahmoody and William Hoffer. Reprinted by permission of St. Martin's Press Inc
It was an unseasonably warm and bright afternoon in mid-autumn when Moody agreed, grudgingly, to Mahtob's request that we go to the park. As we reached the swings and slide at the far end of the park, Mahtob squealed at the sight of a little blond girl, perhaps 4 years old, dressed in shorts and a top and wearing Strawberry Shortcake tennis shoes identical to the ones Mahtob had brought with her from America.
OPINION
June 23, 2003
Re "One Dead in Iranian Exile Protest," June 19: U.S. newspapers have been circumspect in their descriptions of the Moujahedeen Khalq, the Iranian opposition group whose members have taken to self-immolation to protest the arrest of their leaders on terror charges in France. As an Iranian American, I believe that the Moujahedeen Khalq is a terrorist group that does not have Iran's best interests in mind. Its combination of Islam and socialism is no way to run a government, and if it were to take power in Iran, its leaders would kill hundreds of thousands of political opponents.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2013 | By Hector Tobar, Los Angeles Times
In "The Walking," a simple and pure young man circles half the world, on foot, by ship and plane, to a place he's longed to see. As a boy growing up in Iranian Kurdistan, Saladin lost himself in the dreamy vision of California he's seen in the movies. After the new, hard-line Islamic regime of the Ayatollah Khomeini comes to power in Iran in 1979, he imagines Los Angeles as a place of refuge. "As long as he could remember, it had forever been America and always California, not the Texas of the cowboy movies or the glass canyons of New York, but Los Angeles, and eventually, of course, Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2012 | By Richard Verrier
To create the dramatic opening sequence for the CIA thriller “Argo,” filmmakers visited two continents to depict Iranian students storming the American embassy in Tehran. The scene in which students demonstrate in 1979 and climb up the embassy's gate was shot in Istanbul, Turkey. The scene in which they climb down the gate and burst into the embassy compound was filmed some 7,000 miles away -- in the San Fernando Valley. A Veterans Affairs medical building in North Hills, with its institutional, red brick facade, turned out to be remarkably similar to the U.S. embassy in Tehran from which six Americans escaped and sought refuge in the home of the Canadian ambassador.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2012 | By Steve Hochman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Carl St.Clair, the music director and principal conductor of Orange Country's Pacific Symphony, was a bit taken aback at one of the programming choices for the 2012 edition of the organization's American Composers Festival. This year's theme is "Nowruz — Celebrating Spring," marking the Persian New Year and celebrating the prominent Iranian American community and its vast cultural legacy. There's a world premiere of an oratorio by Iranian American composer Richard Danielpour and collaborations between the symphony and Persian music troupe the Shams Ensemble.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2012 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"When the revolution happened" are the first words we hear in "Shahs of Sunset," a new Bravo reality series about the Persian Americans of Los Angeles and Beverly Hills — six of them anyway, and their glimpsed families and supporting-cast friends. The revolution referred to is the one that took place in Iran in 1979, which helped create the sizable diaspora whose local chapter, sometimes called Tehrangeles, comprises the largest Iranian community outside of Iran. The novelty of the setting aside, we have been here before.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2012 | By Martha Groves, Los Angeles Times
Golnesa Gharachedaghi talks like a real soon-to-be housewife of Beverly Hills. The 30-year-old self-proclaimed Persian princess, who doesn't shy away from confrontation or dropping expletives, explains her simple tastes. "There are two things I don't like. I don't like ants, and I don't like ugly people. " Another time, the young woman who says she is eager to settle down offers a guiding principle of her active night life: "Looking good, and not repeating outfits, is imperative.
NATIONAL
October 13, 2011 | Ken Dilanian, Paul Richter and Brian Bennett
Though initially skeptical that top Iranian regime figures were behind a plot to assassinate Saudi Arabia's ambassador to Washington, U.S. government officials became convinced by the operation's money trail and now consider it likely that Iran's supreme leader was aware of the plan. "This is the kind of operation -- the assassination of a diplomat on foreign soil -- that would have been vetted at the highest levels of the Iranian government," said a senior U.S. official who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak publicly about sensitive analyses.
NATIONAL
October 11, 2011 | By Ken Dilanian, Paul Richter and Brian Bennett, Washington Bureau
American officials charged that an alleged plot by Iran to blow up the Saudi ambassador as he dined in Washington marks a radical shift by Tehran toward direct confrontation with the United States. The FBI said Tuesday that it had broken up a conspiracy orchestrated by a secretive unit of Iran's military with close ties to the country's senior leadership. In addition to criminal charges against two alleged perpetrators, the U.S. announced sanctions against five people, including two described as senior officials of Iran's Revolutionary Guard who were accused of overseeing the plot to kill Ambassador Adel Al-Jubeir.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2011 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
Spring came a bit early for the Los Angeles City Council. Bouquets of fuchsia and violet flowers filled council chambers on Friday as council members stood up, one by one, to call for rebirth, rejuvenation and renewal. They were not discussing the city's financial prospects. The occasion was Nowruz, the Persian New Year. Each March, the city's Iranian community throws a lavish Nowruz party at City Hall. In the grand rotunda outside council chambers, goldfish glided inside gilded glass urns and tables overflowed with bite-size walnut cookies flavored with rose water, cardamom and honey.
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