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OPINION
November 19, 2013 | By Richard M. Mosk
Even if Iran ultimately agrees to limitations on its nuclear program, will its leaders comply with the terms? After all, the Iranians have been less than candid over the years. They have railed against the United States and its allies, and they have fomented terrorism. Nevertheless, history demonstrates that, subject to sufficient leverage, Iran can come to an agreement and comply with it. Since the Nov. 4, 1979, takeover of the U.S. Embassy in Tehran and the taking of American hostages there, the United States and Iran have had contacts and made arrangements that both sides have complied with.
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WORLD
November 14, 2013 | By Paul Richter, This article has been corrected. See the note at the bottom for details.
WASHINGTON - Iran's new government has slowed expansion of its nuclear program almost to a halt since August, according to the United Nations nuclear watchdog agency, in what experts view as a strong signal of Tehran's desire to resolve a decade-long diplomatic standoff. A report released Thursday by the Vienna-based International Atomic Energy Agency provides the first independent evidence that President Hassan Rouhani, who was elected in June after promising to end the crisis, has essentially stopped new work at Iran's nuclear facilities, including enrichment of uranium and construction of the heavy-water reactor at Arak.
WORLD
November 12, 2013 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Patrick J. McDonnell
TEHRAN -- It was headline material in New York, but the killing rampage that took the lives of three young Iranian musicians in Brooklyn early Monday merited only a brief mention in the news here, resonating largely amid a coterie of young fans who admired the slain rockers' work. “I'm very sad to hear it,” said Amirali, a graffiti artist who knew two of the victims, Arash and Soroush Farazmand, brothers and members of the Yellow Dogs band, which had achieved a measure of fame among young Iranians at home and in the United States.
WORLD
November 11, 2013 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - The United States and Iran traded heated accusations Monday over who was to blame for the failure of the latest international talks to limit Tehran's nuclear program, even as they insisted a deal remains possible. Secretary of State John F. Kerry said it was the Iranians, and not the French, whose last-minute objections Saturday stalled a preliminary deal that diplomats hoped would lead to a final settlement of the nuclear dispute after a decade of stalemate. "The French signed off on it, we signed off on it," Kerry said Monday in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, where he sought to reassure Arab allies about the nuclear negotiations.
NATIONAL
November 11, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
The New York Police Department has identified three Iranian musicians killed by a former friend in a Brooklyn murder-suicide that left four dead early Monday. Soroush Farazmand, 27, and Arash Farazmand, 28, of the Iranian rock band Yellow Dogs were shot to death along with fellow Iranian musician Ali Eskandarian, 35, at an apartment in East Williamsburg, police said. Police said Ali Akbar Mohammadi Rafie, 29, was found dead with a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head on the roof of the victims' apartment.
NATIONAL
November 11, 2013 | By Matt Pearce and Tina Susman
NEW YORK - They said they sang in English instead of Farsi because they wanted their music to be heard by the world, but their secret performance space in Tehran was padded with Styrofoam so they wouldn't be arrested for playing forbidden music. Their shows in Iran sometimes had lookouts, and the rockers had to ask fans to come but not to bring their friends, lest they attract too much attention. In other words, they were as punk rock as punk rock gets. But when the band known as the Yellow Dogs eventually fled Tehran to escape repression and claim their slice of indie glory in Brooklyn, tragedy followed.
WORLD
November 10, 2013 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Patrick J. McDonnell
TEHRAN - Iranians expressed frustration Sunday with the lack of a much-anticipated breakthrough in nuclear talks with world powers, with many analysts blaming France and Israel but holding back on traditional outbursts against the United States. Still, moderates expressed hope that an accord could be reached at future negotiating sessions, though hard-liners suspect of the entire process were predictably more pessimistic. Kayhan, a hard-line newspaper associated with Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, called the results of the latest round of talks “ambiguous” and declared that world powers were “blackmailing” Iran.
OPINION
November 10, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
It's understandable that there is skepticism about whether Iran would abide by an interim agreement to suspend most of its nuclear activities in exchange for some relief from economic sanctions. But the United States and the other nations that have been negotiating with the new government in Tehran are right to pursue such an arrangement as a way to test Iran's insistence that it's willing to forswear the development of nuclear weapons over the long run. Members of Congress inclined to oppose this initiative should allow it time to succeed or fail.
WORLD
November 8, 2013 | By Patrick J. McDonnell and Ramin Mostaghim, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
BEIRUT - U.S. Secretary of State John F. Kerry arrived in Geneva on Friday amid indications of a possible breakthrough in talks on Iran's controversial nuclear program. Reports from the Swiss city indicated that the contours of a historic interim agreement between the Iranians and six world powers could be in the making, signaling possible progress after years of dispute about Tehran's nuclear efforts. But Kerry told reporters that no final agreement had been reached and important issues remained unresolved.
OPINION
November 6, 2013 | Doyle McManus
After years of fruitless negotiations, the United States may soon face an unfamiliar problem in its long confrontation with Iran: Are we willing to take yes for an answer? Negotiators are scheduled to meet again in Geneva this week to try to move toward an agreement that would put reliable limits on Iran's nuclear program - limits strong enough to reassure other countries that the mullahs cannot build a nuclear weapon. Officials on both sides say they are still a long way from a deal, but they also describe the talks as an important moment of opportunity.
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