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Iraq Borders Kuwait

NEWS
October 9, 1994 | Associated Press
Lines stretched behind cash machines and gasoline stations Saturday as thousands of Iraqi troops massed across the border in a buildup like that presaging the 1990 invasion of Kuwait. But there were few other signs of anxiety after the Cabinet called on Kuwaitis to refrain from hoarding food and water. Traffic at the border with Saudi Arabia was reported normal, and no significant increase in flight reservations was reported.
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NEWS
October 9, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The standoff between Iraq and the United States intensified Saturday as Baghdad moved more troops close to the Kuwaiti border, and the Clinton Administration dispatched 4,000 soldiers to join U.S. ships and planes converging on the Persian Gulf. U.S.
NEWS
November 21, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
More than 500 Iraqis crossed into Kuwait to protest work on a trench the emirate is digging along the disputed border, U.N. observers said. The U.S. State Department condemned the border crossing, the second such incursion in a week. A Kuwaiti contractor working on the trench fired a shot in the air after the Iraqis started throwing stones, said Abullatif Kabbaj, a spokesman for the U.N. A U.N. officer monitoring the demonstration was slightly injured by a stone.
NEWS
May 2, 1993 | Reuters
Kuwait plans to build a barrier, dig trenches and plant more than a million mines along its 80-mile-long border with Iraq, Persian Gulf news agencies quoted the emirate's defense minister as saying Saturday. About 1.3 million mines that Iraqi troops had planted in Kuwait after their August, 1990, invasion will reportedly be replanted along the frontier.
NEWS
February 6, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The U.N. Security Council approved sending a battalion of 750 armed soldiers and support staff to patrol the potentially explosive frontier between Iraq and Kuwait and to use force to repel any incursions. A resolution, adopted by a 15-0 vote, leaves open the possibility of more troops in the future. The measure was authorized under Chapter 7 of the U.N. Charter, which allows for the use of force in case of violations.
NEWS
January 17, 1993 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.N. officials said Saturday that they will consider deploying international peacekeeping troops on this uneasy frontier as a defiant Iraq failed to meet a deadline for removing six disputed police posts in Kuwaiti territory. U.N. spokesman Abdelatif Kabbaj said the secretary general has been asked to consider dispatching peacekeeping troops to the border to supplement the contingent of 249 unarmed U.N. military observers patrolling the nine-mile-wide demilitarized zone on the border.
NEWS
January 16, 1993 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first of more than 1,000 U.S. troops touched down on a wind-swept runway here Friday, preparing to move north into the desert as a new show of allied force against any threats from Iraq. Senior Kuwaiti military commanders greeted the first 350 troops from the Army's 1st Cavalry Division, based at Ft. Hood, Tex., as they debarked from a chartered jumbo jet and prepared to pick up tanks, armored personnel carriers and artillery positioned at a military camp on the Kuwaiti coast.
NEWS
January 15, 1993 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After spending a long night worrying about a possible Iraqi retaliatory strike, Kuwait put its armed forces on full alert Thursday and awaited the arrival of 1,300 new U.S. troops. But Kuwaiti officials said they are "quite confident" that Baghdad will not respond militarily to Wednesday's allied raid against Iraq. "I can assure you that Kuwait is well protected, civilians are well protected and the border is well protected," Information Minister Saud al Sabah told reporters.
NEWS
January 13, 1993 | MELISSA HEALY and ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush decided Tuesday to deliver major air strikes against Iraq sometime this week unless Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein moves immediately to comply with U.N. demands. Administration officials declined to comment on the timetable for military action, which would be calculated to deliver a severe blow to Hussein in retaliation for his flouting of U.N. authority since the end of the Persian Gulf War.
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