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Iraq Borders Kuwait

NEWS
October 13, 1994 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Asserting that the latest Gulf crisis is not over despite an apparent Iraqi retreat, the United States, Britain and six oil-rich monarchies agreed Wednesday to continue their present military buildup and vowed future action to sap Saddam Hussein's capacity to threaten his neighbors. The Gulf Cooperation Council, a regional rich nations club led by Saudi Arabia, agreed to pay a substantial part of the cost of deploying U.S.
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NEWS
October 12, 1994 | ROBIN WRIGHT and MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As pressures mount for a new strategy to ensure that this Iraq crisis is the last, the Clinton Administration may finally have to answer the central question left open by the George Bush Administration: what to do about Iraqi President Saddam Hussein? To prevent the possibility of repetitive crises and revolving-door military deployments, military planners now face the complex issue of Iraq's cunning leader and his future. "It's time to get rid of him.
NEWS
October 12, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iraq began withdrawing some of its forces from the Kuwaiti border area Tuesday in response to the U.S. military buildup. But the Pentagon placed 155,000 more U.S. ground troops on alert in case additional force is needed to meet the Iraqi threat. After a day of uncertainty about Iraq's response, U.S.
NEWS
October 12, 1994 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mohammed Ali Jassem worked his way slowly down the narrow supermarket aisle after work Tuesday, loading the shopping cart with a large case of bottled water while his wife, Shireen, bought two packages each of sugar, flour, rice, tea and a few other staples. "I hate this," Jassem said, adding a case of long-life milk to the groceries. "Every time that jerk Saddam Hussein gets a nutty idea, we and the rest of the world have to go crazy with him."
NEWS
October 11, 1994
Iraqi forces massing along the Kuwaiti border. The White House draws a line in the sand and orders American planes, ships and troops back to the Persian Gulf. The Persian Gulf crisis of 1990-91 was on replay, it seemed to the world's editorial cartoonists, who once again picked up their pens to savage Iraqi President Saddam Hussein and take a few shots at President Clinton too. By Monday, Baghdad's U.N.
NEWS
October 11, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iraq's massing of troops near the Kuwaiti border put Russia in a quandary: Moscow has sided with Washington against Baghdad for reasons of politics and regional stability, but at the same time Russia aims to avoid alienating a country it sees as an important business partner. In recent months, Russia has been moving closer to Iraq, eager to renew one of the Soviet Union's most profitable friendships.
NEWS
October 11, 1994 | MATT LAIT and H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As 18,000 U.S. Marines in Southern California were put on alert for possible deployment to the Middle East, most troops Monday conducted business as usual while some began packing their desert combat equipment and prepared for war. But wherever they were, whatever they were doing, the specter of another war still loomed large in the minds of the Marines, some of whom were asked to put their lives on the line under similar circumstances nearly four years ago in Operation Desert Storm.
NEWS
October 11, 1994 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like a cornered cat, Iraqi President Saddam Hussein is making a desperate bid to survive growing internal pressures and prospects that the international sanctions strangling his economy will not be lifted soon, according to U.S. experts.
NEWS
October 11, 1994 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kuwait reacted with sharp skepticism Monday to Iraq's declaration that it was pulling its troops back from their tense border, and warned that such a move alone would not be enough to end the new Gulf crisis. "If they pulled back their forces a few kilometers to the north, they could come back in a couple of days," said Saud al Sabah, Kuwait's information minister. "This is a cat-and-mouse game with us, and we can't tolerate it. . . .
NEWS
October 11, 1994 | LEN HALL and DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
They watch the news on television, read the newspapers and wait for letters or phone calls. That's how Marine families with loved ones overseas keep track of the latest military developments in the Persian Gulf. News comes in dribs and drabs, through the media or base support groups, or the rumor mill on the bases. Capt. Mike Gamble and Sgt.
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