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Iraq Contracts

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WORLD
October 31, 2003 | From Associated Press
Companies that were awarded $8 billion in contracts to rebuild Iraq and Afghanistan have been major campaign donors to President Bush, and their executives have had important political and military connections, according to a study released Thursday. The study of more than 70 U.S. companies and individual contractors turned up more than $500,000 in donations to the president's 2000 campaign.
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NATIONAL
January 31, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
The U.S. State Department said it would not renew Blackwater Worldwide's contract to protect American diplomats in Iraq when it expires in May. "The department notified Blackwater in writing on Thursday that it did not plan to renew the company's existing task orders for protective security detail in Iraq," said Joanne Moore, a State Department spokeswoman. She said the contract would lapse because of the Iraqi government's decision to deny Blackwater a license to operate. The Iraqis informed the State Department last week of the denial, which was made amid lingering outrage over a September 2007 shooting in Baghdad's Nisoor Square that left 17 Iraqi civilians dead.
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NEWS
April 18, 2003 | David Streitfeld and Mark Fineman, Times Staff Writers
The federal government on Thursday selected San Francisco's Bechtel Group for a $680-million contract to oversee the rebuilding of Iraq, a massive task that will involve everything from airports, schools, roads, bridges and railroads to power grids, water systems and sewers. So crucial is this work to America's postwar presence in the wounded nation that the 98-page request for bids secretly sent out to a handful of American companies declared the effort essential to keeping the peace there.
NATIONAL
March 29, 2006 | Walter F. Roche Jr., Times Staff Writer
Frustrated government auditors pleaded, cajoled and finally threatened Halliburton Co. executives who repeatedly failed to comply with government reporting requirements under a key Iraq contract with a $1.2-billion potential price tag, newly released documents show. The documents, along with a report, were issued Tuesday by the Democratic staff of the House Committee on Government Reform. Rep. Henry A.
WORLD
June 16, 2004 | T. Christian Miller, Times Staff Writer
The Pentagon may have wasted billions of dollars in Iraq because of a lack of planning and poor oversight, top congressional and Defense Department investigators said Tuesday. David M. Walker, head of the General Accounting Office, told a congressional panel that Defense Department planners had failed to adequately determine the needs of U.S. soldiers in Iraq and to effectively oversee the billions of dollars' worth of contracts issued.
NEWS
April 16, 2003 | David Streitfeld and Mark Fineman, Times Staff Writers
Fighting the war in Iraq turned out to be easier than expected. Getting peace off the ground has proven a bit harder. The U.S. Agency for International Development says the $600-million contract to start the rebuilding could be awarded any moment now, which is what it has been suggesting for three weeks. But USAID's attempt to make the process both secret and ultra-quick has drawn suspicion, criticism and investigations. Sen.
NEWS
February 9, 1991 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pentagon is locating and bombing military airfields and hardened bunkers in Iraq with the help of a document obtained from the office of a mysterious, now-deceased Iraqi expatriate and alleged arms broker, an attorney who helped acquire the information said Friday. The document--part of a 1981 contract to build 16 military sites in Iraq for $552 million--was sold to the U.S. Customs Service by an employee of London-based IBI Engineering shortly after Iraq invaded Kuwait last August.
NEWS
December 6, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union on Wednesday welcomed Iraq's announcement that it will allow all 3,300 Soviet workers in the country to leave and expressed its willingness to discuss an Iraqi demand that compensation be paid for broken labor contracts. "If there are going to be costs, we are prepared to bear those costs because we feel that the security and well-being of our citizens should come first," Soviet Foreign Ministry spokesman Vitaly I. Churkin said.
NEWS
December 5, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moving to deflect a rising threat, Iraqi authorities announced Tuesday that all 3,300 Soviet workers can leave the country if Moscow meets certain conditions. The decision by the ruling Revolutionary Command Council demanded that Moscow compensate Baghdad for terminating the labor contracts of the Soviet workers. If the Kremlin agrees, the men will be free to leave today, according to a Baghdad report from the Iraqi News Agency.
NEWS
December 18, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Iraqi and Soviet governments wrangled Monday over the destiny of at least 2,000 Soviet technicians still prevented from leaving Iraq. Iraq has refused to permit them to leave until Moscow pays up on canceled contracts for oil, water and military projects that will be suspended as the workers depart. Although both governments say the issue is economic, there is an undercurrent of Iraqi resentment at having been abandoned by its onetime weapons benefactor.
WORLD
April 23, 2005 | T. Christian Miller, Times Staff Writer
A security firm run by a controversial former British commando was criticized Friday in a U.S. government report that underlined the continued failings of officials responsible for overseeing contracts in Iraq. The report, an audit by the Pentagon's special inspector general for Iraq reconstruction, Stuart W. Bowen Jr.
WORLD
March 24, 2005 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
Secretary-General Kofi Annan met three times with executives of a Swiss company that employed his son, before and after it won a lucrative U.N. contract in Iraq, Annan's chief of staff confirmed Wednesday. Mark Malloch Brown told reporters that the meetings between the secretary-general and executives of Cotecna Inspection were "innocent encounters" and had nothing to do with the company's contract or payments to his son.
WORLD
March 15, 2005 | T. Christian Miller and Mark Mazzetti, Times Staff Writers
Pentagon auditors said Halliburton Corp. might have overcharged the U.S. by more than $100 million on a contract to deliver fuel to Iraq in the early days of the war, according to a report released Monday. Among other items, the Pentagon's Defense Contract Audit Agency said Halliburton had charged $27.5 million to deliver $82,100 worth of liquefied petroleum gas. The DCAA called the price "illogical."
WORLD
March 15, 2005 | Ken Silverstein and T. Christian Miller, Times Staff Writers
Soon after interim Prime Minister Iyad Allawi took office last summer, he announced plans to create a tank division for the new Iraqi army. The $283-million project was supposed to display the power of Iraq's new government. But under the guidance of a task force overseen by one of America's top generals, it has become another chapter in a rebuilding process marked by accusations of corruption. The U.S. contractor working on the project repeatedly warned the task force headed by Army Lt. Gen.
WORLD
June 16, 2004 | T. Christian Miller, Times Staff Writer
The Pentagon may have wasted billions of dollars in Iraq because of a lack of planning and poor oversight, top congressional and Defense Department investigators said Tuesday. David M. Walker, head of the General Accounting Office, told a congressional panel that Defense Department planners had failed to adequately determine the needs of U.S. soldiers in Iraq and to effectively oversee the billions of dollars' worth of contracts issued.
WORLD
March 17, 2004 | From a Times Staff Writer
Nour USA, a Virginia-based company whose $327-million contract to equip the Iraqi army was canceled because of "irregularities" in the bidding process, formally protested the action in a filing with the U.S.-led Iraq occupation authority. Nour asked for $20 million to $30 million in "termination costs" and argued that the cancellation and subsequent disclosure of the company's proposal had "done considerable harm" to it.
NEWS
November 25, 1990 | Associated Press
Iraq is still producing poison gas and other military equipment with foreign help, despite the trade sanctions imposed by the United Nations, the German news magazine Der Spiegel reported Saturday. Spiegel, quoting former German hostages recently released by Iraq and intelligence sources, said Iraqi plants in Samarra are producing 880 pounds daily of Tabun and Lost, two nerve gases.
OPINION
April 11, 2003
As Iraq goes from a military to a financial battleground, billions of taxpayer dollars are at stake. Congress is stepping in to ensure that rebuilding doesn't turn into cronyism for big business. Even the appearance of impropriety by the Pentagon and the U.S. Agency for International Development in awarding bids could sully the U.S. effort to turn Iraq into a functioning democracy. Already, Reps. Henry A. Waxman (D-Los Angeles) and John D. Dingell (D-Mich.
WORLD
March 6, 2004 | T. Christian Miller, Times Staff Writer
Acknowledging "irregularities" in its contracting process, the U.S.-led occupation authority in Iraq on Friday canceled a $327-million deal to equip the Iraqi army. The contract had been awarded to a fledgling Virginia company with limited military supply experience. The U.S.-led Coalition Provisional Authority, which had previously suspended the deal with Nour USA, decided to toss out the contract.
WORLD
March 4, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
After complaints, the U.S.-led Coalition Provisional Authority in Iraq decided to reopen competition to all 17 original bidders for a contract to equip the Iraqi army. Last month, the authority suspended the award to Nour USA, a firm formed in May with no arms supply experience.
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