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Iraq Foreign Relations Kuwait

NEWS
August 27, 1990 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It wasn't the quicksand that was so frightening. Or the sandstorms. Or the oil pipelines that loomed suddenly out of the blowing sand. It was the tanks. "We were afraid the tanks would fire at us and that would be it," said Bassam Mohtady, an American who, with his 8-year-old son, crossed the Kuwaiti desert in a caravan of vehicles led by a local Bedouin guide. "It was like cat and mouse in the desert," added Mohtady, 34, who arrived with his son, Sammer, in Boston on Sunday.
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NEWS
September 8, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO and DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Praying for the men they left behind, 171 American women and children flew to safety from Kuwait on Friday, bringing surreal tales of brutality and courage, of fear, love and absurdity in the ruins of the Iraqi-occupied oil sheikdom. A U.S.-chartered Iraqi Airways Boeing 707 called at Baghdad en route to Amman to inaugurate an air bridge that is expected to operate daily in repatriating the estimated 1,400 American women and children trapped in Kuwait since the Aug. 2 Iraqi invasion.
NEWS
December 26, 1990 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If U.S. troops go to war against Iraq, the deadliest weapon unleashed on them by Saddam Hussein's forces could be stamped "Made in America." Over the objections of its own engineers, Honeywell Inc. provided agents for Iraq with technology for developing fuel-air explosives, devices 10 times more powerful than conventional weapons and considered by some experts to be "a poor man's nuclear weapons."
NEWS
September 1, 1990 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a calculated move that will delay the release of some foreign hostages, Iraq on Friday raised the ante for freeing more than 200 women and children held for weeks at strategic military installations, insisting that only Iraq's state-owned airline can fly them home. The Iraqi government "requested" the governments of Britain and France to allow Iraqi Airlines landing rights for the flights.
NEWS
September 2, 1990 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid the tears of families torn in half and the memories of a month in Iraqi captivity, hundreds of Western women and children, including at least 80 Americans, flew to freedom today in what was billed as a massive humanitarian airlift by Iraqi President Saddam Hussein.
NEWS
October 3, 1990 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move apparently timed to counter last week's highly publicized meeting between the deposed emir of Kuwait and President Bush, Iraqi officials are circulating allegations of moral corruption by the Kuwaiti royal family to the state-run media and the foreign press.
NEWS
October 3, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the ancient port city of Jidda, which for centuries has served as a gateway to the Muslim holy city of Mecca, there is a quarter of brightly lighted shops and run-down auto repair garages, a place where the staid white robes of traditional Saudi dress disappear among the colorful draped skirts and rakish grins of the Yemenis. It is a place, in a country known for good manners and temperate behavior, to which foreigners are advised not to go.
NEWS
August 14, 1990 | Reuters
An airline flight attendant who reached Jordan on Monday said Iraqi troops stormed into a hostel in Kuwait city and raped five Kuwait Airlines flight attendants--two Britons, two Egyptians and a Filipina. Nawal Bel Hadj, 24, of Tunisia, said in an interview that she witnessed the attacks Aug. 7, five days after Iraq invaded Kuwait. "Eight Iraqi soldiers holding machine guns stormed our hostel," she said. "First, they asked our Indian servant for water.
NEWS
October 27, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jordan, once regarded as a massive gap in the trade-sanctions ring around Iraq, now is in full compliance with the U.N.-imposed embargo and is entitled to "generous" economic aid from the world community, the Bush Administration said Friday. The new assessment is a dramatic reversal of the Administration's earlier complaints that Jordan, for years Washington's closest Arab ally, had thrown in its lot with Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein.
NEWS
October 31, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A burst of superheated steam killed 10 American sailors Tuesday in a boiler-room accident aboard a Navy assault ship, forcing a scale-back of a new exercise testing a possible amphibious landing in the Persian Gulf conflict. The break in a high-pressure steam line came just minutes after the 29-year-old Iwo Jima pulled out of port in Manama, Bahrain, where it had undergone five days of repairs, according to military officials here.
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