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Iraq Foreign Relations Kuwait

NEWS
March 6, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a flurry of concessions to Kuwait and its allied liberators, Iraq officially renounced its annexation of the war-ravaged emirate on Tuesday and vowed to return hundreds of millions of dollars worth of looted property, including nearly a dozen civilian jetliners, gold taken from a Central Bank vault and scores of priceless museum pieces. Iraqi Foreign Minister Tarik Aziz announced the measures in a letter to U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar.
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NEWS
March 4, 1991 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unprecedented in its international scope, miraculous for its low allied casualties and breathtaking in its swift and crushing victory, Operation Desert Storm will be studied for years as a model application of German military theorist Carl von Clausewitz's principle that war is political relations carried out by other means.
NEWS
March 2, 1991
"Suggestions out of Washington that reparations could be dropped if the Iraqi military would only overthrow Saddam Hussein are shortsighted. The principle that a country is legally and enforceably liable for damages it causes to others must surely be a foundation stone of a new order based on law. "But Kuwait is perfectly free to reduce its reparation claims or forgive outright, if it wants to shore up a successor regime in Baghdad.
NEWS
March 2, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
King Hussein, reaching out to both Iraq and Kuwait, called Friday for postwar unity among the Arabs and warned of "painful memories which can be transformed into hatred and rancor if they are allowed to grow and fester." "I do not propose to go into the details of the sad drama because you know it too well. You have lived it," he said of the Persian Gulf crisis that divided Arab countries into hostile camps.
NEWS
February 25, 1991 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Iraq's troops reportedly setting Kuwait's oil fields ablaze, detonating its oil producing facilities and torching its commercial centers, a grim picture is emerging of two nations--both the aggressor and the victim--ending the war in ruins.
BUSINESS
February 16, 1991 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stock prices soared, gold and oil prices plunged, and the dollar found new strength Friday thanks to Saddam Hussein's conditional offer to withdraw from Kuwait. Although Iraq's offer was quickly rejected by coalition forces, market watchers believed it signaled an imminent end to the Persian Gulf conflict and a turning point for the U.S. economy. "The markets are expecting a settlement to the war," said Gerald Appel, president of Signalert in Great Neck, N.Y.
NEWS
February 11, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kuwait's government-in-exile, steeling itself to the prospect of returning to a country in ruins, is assembling an emergency team in a staging area near here to move in swiftly behind allied forces and restore basic public services to a liberated Kuwait. Contracts worth up to $800 million have been awarded to companies worldwide to bring in emergency water, power, food and medical supplies to Kuwaitis in the critical days after Iraqi troops are driven out of the country.
NEWS
February 11, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iran's week-old initiative to stop the Persian Gulf War foundered Sunday on continued Iraqi determination to hold on to Kuwait. Baghdad Radio, Iraq's army newspaper and a traveling member of President Saddam Hussein's inner circle all insisted that the Iraqi regime will make no compromises on its claim to the conquered sheikdom and that it is awaiting a coming ground war with American-led forces.
NEWS
February 5, 1991 | JENNIFER TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If the chief diplomats from warring Kuwait and Iraq were to run into each other on one of Washington's sidewalks--now spackled with spray-painted anti-war slogans and littered with "Free Kuwait" fliers--they would probably pause, shake hands somberly and then briskly walk their separate ways. Such are the niceties of the Arab diplomatic world. Although their embassies are close by, the diplomats rarely see each other these days. And if they do, it's on television.
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