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Iraq Government

WORLD
May 23, 2006 | Louise Roug, Times Staff Writer
British Prime Minister Tony Blair and President Bush hailed the new Iraqi government as a pivotal achievement Monday, both expressing optimism that it would hasten an end to the conflict that has harmed their domestic popularity but stopping short of tying it to a timetable for drawing down troops. Blair, in a surprise visit to Baghdad, said the formation of Prime Minister Nouri Maliki's government was "a new beginning," while Bush, speaking in Chicago, called it "a turning point" for Iraq.
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WORLD
October 7, 2005 | Noam N. Levey, Times Staff Writer
Thirty-five miles north of Baghdad, on a dusty U.S. Army base outside this provincial capital, the officer and the sheik are debating free speech. Sheik Hanesh Musawi, a robed city councilman from nearby Khan Bani Saad, has come to complain about a recent pro-Saddam Hussein demonstration. "I told my people that the Americans would not allow this," Musawi says as he sits down with Lt. Col. Oscar J. Hall IV in a spare concrete room on the base.
WORLD
August 9, 2005 | T. Christian Miller, Times Staff Writer
The rusted skiffs chug down this broad channel lined with marsh, sometimes so laden with illegal cargo that they rise only half a foot above the waterline. Usually they're carrying diesel fuel, bought cheaply in Iraq and smuggled for a handy profit to countries such as Iran, Kuwait and the United Arab Emirates. To authorities here in the southeastern tip of Iraq, the smugglers are no more than a law enforcement nuisance. But for U.S.
OPINION
March 26, 2005
Re "Sharia: Iraq's Dark Cloud," Commentary, March 21: If we are truly interested in bringing or at least promoting democracy in Iraq, it behooves us to let the people of Iraq freely choose their government. It is hypocritical to demand democracy from other countries and then oppose it when this democracy brings people into power who are not necessarily a perfect reflection of our views or obedient puppets to our policies. Let's have faith in the Iraqis. For Susan Jacoby to imply that she knows what is best for Iraqis, more than Iraqis themselves, is nothing short of a typical colonialist attitude.
WORLD
March 8, 2005 | From Associated Press
A Bulgarian soldier killed last week in Iraq was probably shot by coalition forces, the defense minister said Monday, and the president complained to the U.S. ambassador. Defense Minister Nikolai Svinarov told reporters that officials had "enough grounds to believe the death of Pvt. Gardi Gardev was caused by friendly fire." Svinarov said the incident involving Gardev began Friday when a Bulgarian patrol was approached by a civilian Iraqi car.
OPINION
August 18, 2004
Re "News Should Flow in Iraq," editorial, Aug. 15: The Times, citing the critical importance of freedom of expression, was correct to condemn the closure of the Baghdad bureau of Al Jazeera by the Iraqi government. Al Jazeera has always given extensive airtime to U.S. government spokesmen and the government we brought to power. Without its Baghdad bureau, Al Jazeera no longer is in a position to balance its coverage of the opposition with interviews with the U.S.-sponsored government, which has partially disappeared from Arab television.
WORLD
June 13, 2004 | Ashraf Khalil, Special to The Times
When Iraqi interim Prime Minister Iyad Allawi first met with his fledgling Cabinet this month, one of the top items on the agenda was how to keep all the members alive. The urgent need for such discussions in Iraq was highlighted today when gunmen killed the cultural affairs officer for the Education Ministry, the second attack on an Iraqi official in as many days. Kamal Jarah was shot outside his Baghdad home as he was leaving for work about 7:30 a.m. He died at Yarmouk Hospital.
WORLD
June 9, 2004 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
The Security Council unanimously approved a resolution Tuesday endorsing the U.S. hand-over of sovereignty to the Iraqi interim government June 30 and authorizing multinational forces to stay in the country for at least a year with the government's consent. The resolution, which seeks to formally end the U.S. occupation of Iraq, gave the new Iraqi government control of its soldiers, police and oil resources and a say -- but not a veto -- on the multinational forces' operations.
WORLD
June 3, 2004 | Laura King and Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writers
Ayham Sameraei may have drawn the most unenviable job in the new Iraqi caretaker government. The 52-year-old U.S.-educated engineer is the minister of electricity, charged with getting Iraq's feeble power grid functioning smoothly -- preferably before summer attains the full strength of its scorching heat.
WORLD
October 19, 2003 | From Associated Press
Turkey's prime minister said Saturday that his country would scrap plans to send troops to Iraq if Iraqis continued to oppose the deployment. Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan's government supports sending peacekeepers to Iraq, as requested by the United States. Parliament approved a deployment last week. But the proposed deployment has met vocal opposition from many Iraqis, who fear that Turkey will pursue its own agenda once in Iraq. The U.S.
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