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NEWS
February 26, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several years ago, during a visit to the palace of Saudi Arabia's King Fahd, Iraqi President Saddam Hussein startled his hosts with a sudden, ghoulish intimation of the violent end that he foresaw for himself. "If I ever fall," Hussein said, brandishing his little finger, "you won't find this much of my body left. People will cut it into pieces."
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WORLD
October 30, 2011 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
The war of words between Tehran and Washington intensified Sunday, with Iran's supreme leader crediting the "unified resistance" of the Iraqi people with having forced the U.S. military out of Iraq. Ayatollah Ali Khamenei said the U.S. withdrawal would constitute "golden pages" in Iraq's history, reported Iran's official Islamic Republic News Agency. "Despite the U.S. military and political presence in Iraq, and Washington's pressures on the country, all Iraq people ... said, 'No, to U.S.,' " Khamenei declared in a Tehran meeting with Massoud Barzani, president of Iraq's Kurdish region.
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NEWS
August 29, 1990 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This nation redrew the world map Tuesday, erasing Kuwait from the face of the globe and making the former emirate its newest, and clearly its richest, southernmost province. In a decree from President Saddam Hussein, Iraq spared no effort in removing every reference to the name of the nation that was its southern neighbor for more than a century, officially designating Kuwait as Province 19.
WORLD
July 4, 2011 | By Raheem Salman and Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times
Abdullah Saadi fingers the fine brown leather belt with holsters for thimble-sized coffee cups and a dagger. He is a keeper of customs, Baghdad's professional server of coffee. He sits in a brick house behind an iron gate in the cramped warrens of Sadr City. The room is painted bright lemon in contrast to the gray street outside. His mother walks through the room, half-embarrassed, singing for guests, "I am the mother of the coffee maker. " She thumps her chest and laughs at her son. In Iraq, coffee isn't merely a matter of ordering a grande to go from Starbucks.
NEWS
August 14, 1990 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One day during the Iran-Iraq War a few years ago, Saddam Hussein declared a holiday in his own honor. From across the country, schoolchildren and factory workers poured into Baghdad by the thousands--aboard buses and flatbed trucks driven by army soldiers. The office buildings in Baghdad emptied, and shoulder to shoulder the chanting throngs stood, their throaty cheers echoing across the plazas of Haifa Street to the banks of the Tigris River: "Saddam! Saddam! Saddam Hussein!"
NEWS
December 3, 1990 | Reuters
The government announced Sunday that it is setting up a new agency to produce a biography immortalizing President Saddam Hussein. The official Iraqi News Agency said the National Assembly has passed a law giving the new body the sole mandate of preparing a true account of Hussein's life.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1991 | GEORGE W. CORNELL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A ruler who long ago held sway over the region now controlled by Iraq's Saddam Hussein once confronted a disturbing phenomenon described in the Bible--a hand writing these words on a wall: "MENE, MENE, TEKEL and PARSIN." As interpreted by the prophet Daniel, the Aramaic words meant in part, "God has numbered the days of your kingdom . . . you have been weighed in balances and found wanting."
NEWS
May 20, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The evidence of two crushing wars and a bitter rebellion within 11 years is still vivid in this age-old port on the Shatt al Arab waterway. The flame-blackened facade of the Basra Sheraton Hotel bears testimony to the terrible pounding the city has taken, over the decade perhaps the heaviest in the country. During Iraq's 1980-88 war with Iran, shellfire battered the Sheraton. Rebuilt, the hotel was burned out again two months ago in the Shiite Muslim insurgency against Baghdad.
NEWS
February 1, 1991 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
History is repeating itself, as it often does in the Middle East. The public display of war prisoners, the threat of unveiling a secret "mother" weapon and the defiant promise to fight on against overwhelming odds are all vintage Saddam Hussein from the days of the Iran-Iraq War.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1991 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Archeologists and art historians who specialize in the cultural history of Iraq tuned to television news reports of the bombing of Baghdad on Thursday with a strange mixture of concern and relief. The concern came from fears that the unprecedented, massive bombing of Baghdad and other Iraqi locales might inflict irreparable damage on museums and archeological sites that contain some of the richest--and most irreplaceable--treasures relating to Mideast history and culture.
OPINION
December 31, 2006 | Christopher Hitchens, CHRISTOPHER HITCHENS is a columnist for Vanity Fair and the author of "A Long Short War: The Postponed Liberation of Iraq."
I WAS SITTING with President Jalal Talabani of Iraq earlier this month when Iraqi television was broadcasting the trial of Saddam Hussein. The hearings had shifted into their second phase, concerning the mass murder of Iraq's Kurdish minority in the 1980s, and video footage of gassing and shooting had been played in court, to ram home the anguished statements of numberless survivors. There was something both satisfying and unsettling about the juxtaposition.
WORLD
December 29, 2005 | Borzou Daragahi and Louise Roug, Times Staff Writers
The myth of a unified Iraqi identity may have finally been laid to rest this month. More clearly than any other measurement since the U.S.-led 2003 invasion, preliminary results from the Dec. 15 parliamentary elections show Iraq as three lands with three distinct identities, divided by faith, goals, region, history and symbols. Iraqis of all stripes say they are the descendants of Mesopotamia, the glorious great-grandchildren of the cradle of civilization.
OPINION
October 20, 2005 | Victor Davis Hanson, VICTOR DAVIS HANSON is a classicist and military historian and the author of "A War Like No Other: How the Athenians and Spartans Fought the Peloponnesian War," published by Random House this month.
MODERNISTS LIKE to believe that we have entered an entirely new era of armed conflict. To some military thinkers, it's the primordial nature of the terrorists' beheadings, suicide bombings and improvised explosive devices that has marked a completely new form of "asymmetrical warfare" in which the two sides are terribly mismatched. Others have a different argument.
NEWS
October 31, 1999 | LEON BARKHO, ASSOCIATED PRESS
During its heyday two millenniums ago, the Roman emperor Julian II was so entranced by the architecture of the Persian capital of Ctesiphon that he ordered his legions to leave it alone. Two decades ago, President Saddam Hussein added his own grandiose touches to the ruins of Ctesiphon--which is pronounced TES-eh-fahn--seeking to rekindle enthusiasm for the site about 30 miles south of Baghdad. Today, like everything else in Iraq, ancient Ctesiphon and the monuments Hussein built are crumbling.
NEWS
September 20, 1994 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a single Land of Islam that the prophet Mohammed claimed on behalf of his followers. But the years after his death saw a power struggle that would forever divide Muslims between Sunnis and Shiites. The long-ago contest persists to this day, as Iran's Shiite government rivals Sunni leaders--from moderates in Egypt, Jordan and Saudi Arabia to Sunni fundamentalists in Sudan--for ideological and political supremacy over the world's 1 billion Muslims.
NEWS
October 4, 1992 | LEON BARKHO, REUTERS
An idled brick factory and nylon sheets flapping in the wind above a Mesopotamian ruin are symbols of the collapse of Iraq's efforts to save its ancient cultural heritage. Hampered by a lack of cash and crippled by Gulf War sanctions, Iraqi scholars and conservation experts say they are losing the battle to save what is left of the Mesopotamian civilization of 6,000 years ago.
NEWS
January 16, 1987 | MICHAEL ROSS, Times Staff Writer
In the same hour came forth fingers of a man's hand, and wrote . . . upon the plaster of the wall of the king's palace. . . . And this is the writing that was written. . . . God hath numbered thy kingdom, and finished it. . . . Thou art weighed in the balances, and art found wanting. From the Book of Daniel, Chapter 5 There is still handwriting on the wall of Nebuchadnezzar's palace.
NEWS
February 8, 1989
Iraq's President Saddam Hussein has been head of state for 10 years and has wielded de facto power for more than twice that long, pursuing his twin goals of socialism and pan-Arab nationalism. Saddam Hussein Tikriti--his last name is seldom used--was born to a peasant family in 1937 in the village of Tikrit. At school, he became active with the anti-monarchist Arab Baath Socialist Party. In later years he was often on the run or in prison.
NEWS
May 20, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The evidence of two crushing wars and a bitter rebellion within 11 years is still vivid in this age-old port on the Shatt al Arab waterway. The flame-blackened facade of the Basra Sheraton Hotel bears testimony to the terrible pounding the city has taken, over the decade perhaps the heaviest in the country. During Iraq's 1980-88 war with Iran, shellfire battered the Sheraton. Rebuilt, the hotel was burned out again two months ago in the Shiite Muslim insurgency against Baghdad.
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