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Iraq Revolts

NEWS
September 10, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT and HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Kurdish forces backed by Iraqi President Saddam Hussein on Monday swept into Sulaymaniyah, effectively extending Baghdad's control over all of northern Iraq for the first time since the United States created a Kurdish haven after the 1991 Persian Gulf War. Sulaymaniyah--with a population of about 750,000--had been the headquarters of the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK), which has waged serious battle with the Hussein-backed Democratic Party of Kurdistan (KDP) since last month.
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NEWS
September 7, 1996 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As he works a battery of satellite phones high in the mountains of Iraqi Kurdistan, Jalal Talabani looks like the winner in the latest struggle for control of the northern region of the country. Yet with last weekend's capture of the Kurdistan capital of Irbil, the military upper hand has gone to his soft-spoken rival, Masoud Barzani, whose sole satellite phone is often out of order. Much is riding on the outcome of a decades-old feud between the two men.
NEWS
September 6, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the aftermath of Iraq's invasion of its Kurdish north and the U.S. response, the breakup of Kurdistan has begun. The fragmentation of the rugged and remote northern Iraqi enclave creates opportunities that are already being exploited by neighboring Iran and Turkey, creating even more volatility in the region. And, as a result, a complex situation could soon become even messier.
NEWS
September 5, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the surprise of practically no one in Washington, Saddam Hussein basically didn't blink. Even as the Iraqi president appeared to be withdrawing at least some of his troops from the Kurdish city of Irbil, new dust-ups in the air underscored the challenges ahead as U.S. troops seek to enforce the newly expanded "no-fly" zone that President Clinton ordered over southern Iraq.
NEWS
September 5, 1996 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton said Wednesday that Iraq appeared to be withdrawing its troops from Irbil, the Kurdish city that Iraqi forces invaded last week, but he cautioned that "it's too soon to say" whether the pullback will be "permanent." Declaring the two rounds of U.S. missile strikes against Iraq on Tuesday and Wednesday a success, Clinton said Iraqi President Saddam Hussein "now knows that there is a price to pay for stepping over the line" set by the United Nations and the Western allies.
NEWS
September 5, 1996
The newly expanded "no-fly" zone takes U.S. air patrols north to within 30 miles of Baghdad. The zone, which was put into effect noon Wednesday (2 a.m. PDT), is off-limits to Iraqi aircraft. Here is how the area, and the other excluision zone in the north, are being monitored by U.S.
NEWS
September 5, 1996 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the five years since the Persian Gulf War, Arab leaders have been waiting for the other shoe to drop in Iraq, and it has not happened: Dictator Saddam Hussein clings to power in Baghdad--belligerent, violent and dreaming of revenge. Now, even some of America's strongest allies in the Arab world are telling President Clinton that the United States should either marshal the forces necessary to topple Hussein or acknowledge that he is here to stay and adjust its policies accordingly.
NEWS
September 5, 1996 | HUGH POPE and WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sign painters, patient women seeking water and a soft drink salesman mingled with dust devils under a broiling sun Wednesday as its new Iraqi Kurdish rulers displayed this bruised but breathing city to foreign reporters. Of Iraqi troops there was no evidence. But their scarring passage had left the capital of Iraqi Kurdistan shell-pocked, and its 1 million inhabitants without electricity and short of food and water.
NEWS
September 4, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration's new strategy on Iraq marks a long-avoided and potentially risky turning point in the two nations' six-year confrontation as the United States extends its line in the sand right up to Baghdad. "The United States is no longer willing to act just around the periphery of Iraq--in the Kurdish north or the Shiite south," a Pentagon official said Tuesday. "We are now prepared to respond with attacks to the center."
NEWS
September 4, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. forces today struck Iraqi targets for a second time as part of an operation that President Clinton pledged would continue until Iraqi President Saddam Hussein complies with standards of international conduct. Pentagon sources said that 17 cruise missiles were launched from four Navy vessels at about 3 a.m. Iraqi time today. "This operation is designed to eliminate sites not destroyed in Tuesday morning's initial cruise missile attack," the White House said in a terse statement.
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