Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsIraq Schools
IN THE NEWS

Iraq Schools

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 8, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two days into the new school year, the fourth graders, nicely turned out in white shirts and gray trousers and jumpers, sat attentively at their desks for geography class. It began with the daily current affairs quiz. Mrs. Nasahah, the school's director, conducted. British colonialists separated Kuwait from the Iraqi motherland, she said. Why did they do that? Several hands shot up, and Nasahah pointed to a girl in the first row. She rose and answered: "Because they wanted control. And the oil."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 8, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two days into the new school year, the fourth graders, nicely turned out in white shirts and gray trousers and jumpers, sat attentively at their desks for geography class. It began with the daily current affairs quiz. Mrs. Nasahah, the school's director, conducted. British colonialists separated Kuwait from the Iraqi motherland, she said. Why did they do that? Several hands shot up, and Nasahah pointed to a girl in the first row. She rose and answered: "Because they wanted control. And the oil."
Advertisement
OPINION
April 19, 2003
Last week at Alain Leroy Locke High in South Los Angeles, 300 students who might have been working to raise their school's abysmally low test scores instead put their energy into a bloody lunchtime melee. Police arrested six on charges that included weapons possession. A few weeks earlier, as many as 500 students at the equally underperforming Washington Preparatory High School, also in South L.A., threw cans and chairs at each other and police during a brawl.
WORLD
February 8, 2005 | Robin Fields, Times Staff Writer
Down a side street in the busy Yarmouk district, midterm exams are underway at Al Mamoon Scientific Secondary School. Principal Sabah Masraf unlocks a cabinet, takes out a stack of sealed brown envelopes, slits them with a razor blade, then hands out tests to rows of anxious teenage boys. Al Mamoon itself is a test. It is among 13 new private schools that opened here in the fall, the first of their kind since Saddam Hussein nationalized the education system three decades ago.
NEWS
December 16, 2006
EDITORS' CHOICE: It's giving season on Wall Street. When Morgan Stanley Chief Executive John Mack checks his stocking, he'll find a $40 million Christmas bonus in stocks and options. And no lumps of coal at Goldman Sachs -- employees there will earn an average of $622,000. BUSINESS, C1.
NEWS
May 11, 2003 | Barbara Ehrenreich, Barbara Ehrenreich is the author, most recently, of "Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting by in America."
With Washington fixated on the looming war between the departments of State and Defense, almost no one has noticed an even stranger development within the Bush administration -- its sudden, and apparently wholehearted, embrace of socialism. Echoing sentiments expressed in an earlier era by Eugene V. Debs and Woody Guthrie, Colin Powell declared recently, "Iraq's oil belongs to the Iraqi people."
WORLD
October 19, 2003 | Tyler Marshall and David Lamb, Times Staff Writers
American-led forces surrounded the headquarters of a militant Shiite leader near one of Islam's most revered shrines Saturday and set up roadblocks to prevent more of his supporters from entering the city center a day after three U.S. soldiers were killed in a brief but violent firefight with his bodyguards. The battle here between U.S. and Iraqi police and the followers of Ayatollah Mahmoud Hassani claimed the lives of a U.S. military police battalion commander and two other U.S.
NATIONAL
October 10, 2003 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
In twin speeches seen as the unofficial opening of his reelection campaign, President Bush on Thursday forcefully invoked the memory of the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, warning that "America must not forget the lessons of Sept. 11." "After all the progress we have made against terror, there is a temptation to think the danger has passed.
WORLD
December 16, 2006 | Solomon Moore, Times Staff Writer
Iraq's schools, long touted by American officials as a success story in a land short on successes, increasingly are being caught in the crossfire of the country's escalating civil war. President Bush has routinely talked about the refurbishment and construction of schools as a neglected story of progress in Iraq. The U.S. Agency for International Development has spent about $100 million on Iraq's education system and cites the rehabilitation of 2,962 school buildings as a signal accomplishment.
WORLD
March 25, 2007 | Alexandra Zavis, Times Staff Writer
Artist Jabbar Muhaybis stood amid the ashes of Baghdad's storied literary bazaar. Bloodstained pages were scattered at his feet. A wooden crate, eerily reminiscent of a coffin, covered his head. Muhaybis spread his arms wide and, in a symbolic gesture, sadly intoned from the darkness of his crate: "The light will not shine here again."
OPINION
May 14, 2004 | William Powers, William Powers is the media critic for the National Journal.
"I've stopped reading the newspapers," Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said Thursday in Baghdad to a gathering of soldiers, who broke out in rousing applause. It was a joke. Or was it? After all, this is not exactly an administration of news junkies. The president himself admitted last year he "rarely" reads news stories, relying instead on the more "objective sources" on his staff to tell him what's happening in the world.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|