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Iraq Trade Jordan

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NEWS
November 28, 1991 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iraq is exporting massive amounts of goods in violation of U.N. sanctions and using the money it earns to buy food, medicine and luxuries for army units crucial to keeping Iraqi President Saddam Hussein in power, Senate investigators reported Wednesday. A study conducted by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee found commerce moving freely across Iraq's borders with Iran, Jordan and Turkey.
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NEWS
August 19, 1995 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite strident denials from Iraq of any aggressive intent, the United States is rushing a brigade of 1,400 troops to Kuwait for military exercises as a reinforced warning to Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, the Pentagon said Friday. The U.S. troops, based at Ft. Hood, Tex., had been scheduled to take part in joint exercises with Kuwaiti troops in late October or early November.
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NEWS
February 14, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Jordanian government on Wednesday nailed down Syrian petroleum supplies to replace war-disrupted imports from Iraq and keep its staggering economy fueled, Jordanian officials said. Amman will have to pay world market prices instead of the discount deal provided by Baghdad in recent years, but the supply line should be secure, the officials said. Iraqi oil, brought into Jordan by tanker trucks, will continue to supply most of Jordan's needs.
NEWS
June 19, 1993 | Associated Press
President Clinton pressed Jordan's King Hussein on Friday to enforce trade sanctions against Iraq and be "very tough on them." Their meeting came just two days after newly declassified documents showed that Jordan provided military help to Baghdad during the Persian Gulf War. Clinton made clear to Hussein that the sanctions are "incredibly important to the United States and we'll continue to press to see that sanctions are enforced," White House Press Secretary Dee Dee Myers said.
NEWS
December 8, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
A convoy of heavy trucks, their cargoes shrouded by tarpaulins, lined a road in the fenced duty-free zone east of the Jordanian refinery center at Zarqa recently. Many of the big rigs bore Iraqi license plates. On the Baghdad-Zarqa-Amman highway, tankers rolled westward through the desert, bringing in Iraqi crude oil. Diplomats in the Jordanian capital report that Iraqi trucks have been spotted around the southern port of Aqaba.
NEWS
June 19, 1993 | Associated Press
President Clinton pressed Jordan's King Hussein on Friday to enforce trade sanctions against Iraq and be "very tough on them." Their meeting came just two days after newly declassified documents showed that Jordan provided military help to Baghdad during the Persian Gulf War. Clinton made clear to Hussein that the sanctions are "incredibly important to the United States and we'll continue to press to see that sanctions are enforced," White House Press Secretary Dee Dee Myers said.
NEWS
August 17, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush, after an emergency meeting Thursday with Jordan's King Hussein, said he was "very pleased" by a renewed Jordanian pledge to honor the U.N. embargo against Iraq, but Administration officials privately expressed fear that the king may still help Iraq obtain basic foodstuffs and other vital material. King Hussein, whose country is economically dependent on neighboring Iraq, has been a reluctant supporter of the U.N. sanctions from the beginning.
NEWS
February 17, 1991
QUESTION: Is Jordan's King Hussein siding with Saddam Hussein? ANSWER: The Jordanian monarch has been trying to walk a difficult diplomatic tightrope of neutrality. In an impassioned Feb. 6 address to his nation, he expressed the strongest possible sympathy and support for the Iraqi people, particularly the civilians enduring relentless bombardment and critical shortages of food, fuel, heat and water.
NEWS
September 15, 1990
The U.N. sanctions against Iraq and the multinational armada enforcing them have succeeded in stopping virtually all of Iraq's exports of oil as well as most imports of bulk items. Smaller cargoes are harder to stop, and a complete halt to smuggling would be impossible. Some countries that are sympathetic to Iraq have already flown in food and medicines, permitted for "humanitarian purposes" under the U.N. resolution.
NEWS
August 24, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government of Jordan took its first public, if tentative, step Thursday toward complying with a U.N. trade embargo on Iraq by asking for $2 billion in compensation for direct and indirect costs of cutting off commerce with its next-door neighbor. The United Nations set up a special committee in New York to consider Jordan's request for aid. "Jordan is a special case and needs particular help," said Crispin Tickell, the British ambassador to the United Nations, in a report from New York.
NEWS
July 25, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This barren outpost in the desert has become a new frontier in a war that never ended. Every day, hundreds of trucks lurch through its gates, their trailers stuffed with cargo bound for distant markets in Syria, Saudi Arabia and--in the face of a two-year-old international trade embargo--Iraq. Through the bustling import-export zone here, cargoes of cigarettes, canned goods, produce and medicine--humanitarian items allowed under U.N.
NEWS
December 8, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
A convoy of heavy trucks, their cargoes shrouded by tarpaulins, lined a road in the fenced duty-free zone east of the Jordanian refinery center at Zarqa recently. Many of the big rigs bore Iraqi license plates. On the Baghdad-Zarqa-Amman highway, tankers rolled westward through the desert, bringing in Iraqi crude oil. Diplomats in the Jordanian capital report that Iraqi trucks have been spotted around the southern port of Aqaba.
NEWS
November 28, 1991 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iraq is exporting massive amounts of goods in violation of U.N. sanctions and using the money it earns to buy food, medicine and luxuries for army units crucial to keeping Iraqi President Saddam Hussein in power, Senate investigators reported Wednesday. A study conducted by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee found commerce moving freely across Iraq's borders with Iran, Jordan and Turkey.
NEWS
February 17, 1991
QUESTION: Is Jordan's King Hussein siding with Saddam Hussein? ANSWER: The Jordanian monarch has been trying to walk a difficult diplomatic tightrope of neutrality. In an impassioned Feb. 6 address to his nation, he expressed the strongest possible sympathy and support for the Iraqi people, particularly the civilians enduring relentless bombardment and critical shortages of food, fuel, heat and water.
NEWS
February 14, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Jordanian government on Wednesday nailed down Syrian petroleum supplies to replace war-disrupted imports from Iraq and keep its staggering economy fueled, Jordanian officials said. Amman will have to pay world market prices instead of the discount deal provided by Baghdad in recent years, but the supply line should be secure, the officials said. Iraqi oil, brought into Jordan by tanker trucks, will continue to supply most of Jordan's needs.
NEWS
September 28, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Abdullah Nsour put plainly the woes of Jordan as seen from his city in the rocky hills northwest of Amman. "People come to me and say, 'Mr. Mayor, I'm going to be ruined,' " he said. "Our problem is poverty." Other cities are hurting more in the backwash of the trade embargo against Iraq. In the southern port of Aqaba, for instance, there are only two or three ships this week at docks with room for 16. The shock was sudden in Aqaba.
NEWS
August 16, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Heavy trucks roared north out of Aqaba carrying wheat for Iraq on Wednesday as Jordanian officials looked for a way to keep the port open. Since the U.S. Navy began turning shipping away from Iraq's ports on the Persian Gulf, this Jordanian port on an arm of the Red Sea has become the only one where cargo for Iraq can be landed. On Wednesday, trucks were taking on wheat that had been unloaded into Aqaba's silos, then heading north to Amman and on east to Iraq.
NEWS
August 18, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This remote desert border crossing, where the slightest breeze whips up clouds of dust, is Iraq's only two-way door on the world. Here it is clearly evident that Jordan has refused to apply the U.N. sanctions against Iraq. On Friday, trucks carrying wheat, rice, cotton, sheet metal and other goods were lined up here waiting to cross over into Iraq. But the most notable activity involved foreigners fleeing Kuwait as a result of the Iraqi invasion.
NEWS
September 15, 1990
The U.N. sanctions against Iraq and the multinational armada enforcing them have succeeded in stopping virtually all of Iraq's exports of oil as well as most imports of bulk items. Smaller cargoes are harder to stop, and a complete halt to smuggling would be impossible. Some countries that are sympathetic to Iraq have already flown in food and medicines, permitted for "humanitarian purposes" under the U.N. resolution.
NEWS
September 11, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Foreign tourists have vanished, Red Sea dockworkers are idle and 70% of the national truck fleet is off the road. International air tickets out of Amman carry a $100 war-risk surcharge. Jordan is paying a heavy price for the international sanctions against neighboring Iraq--and is demanding help to offset it. "Our economy was pitiful before the trouble began.
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