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Iraq War 2003

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Marine Corps officer was convicted Wednesday of dereliction of duty and maltreatment of prisoners for not stopping his subordinates from abusing Iraqis. A court-martial acquitted Maj. Clarke Paulus of assault and battery. The same jury sentenced Paulus to be discharged from the Marine Corps. His attorney vowed to appeal that decision to the commanding general.
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NATIONAL
September 3, 2007 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Times Staff Writer
One of the most heavily criticized actions in the aftermath of the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq in March 2003 was the decision, barely two months later, to disband the Iraqi army, alienating former soldiers and driving many straight into the ranks of anti-American militant groups. But excerpts of a new biography of President Bush show him saying that he initially wanted to maintain the Iraqi army and, more surprising, that he cannot recall why his administration decided to disband it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2004 | Jose Cardenas, Times Staff Writer
Before Army Maj. Mark D. Taylor deployed to Iraq in August, he put a set of dog tags around his 6-year-old son Connor's neck and told the boy, "Wear them until Daddy comes home." "The little boy has never taken them off," said Taylor's mother, Roberta Taylor. The boy's 41-year-old father was killed March 20 when a rocket hit his living area in Fallouja. Taylor was a surgeon assigned to the 782nd Main Support Battalion, 82nd Airborne Division at Ft. Bragg, N.C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2004 | Jose Cardenas, Times Staff Writer
Upon his return from Iraq, Army Spc. Christopher K. Hill had hoped to bring his wife and baby daughter from North Carolina to visit the Moorpark neighborhood where he grew up. After his death, many neighbors there decorated their homes and mailboxes with American flags to honor the hometown hero who never came home. In the days after his burial, his parents, Ken and Adrienne Hill, went to each house and placed a note near the flags, thanking the neighbors for their support.
NEWS
April 6, 2003 | David Zucchino, Times Staff Writer
If Saturday's armored column attack into Baghdad stunned the city's defenders, the idea of such a daylight dash had also surprised American tank commanders. "We all thought they were kidding when the battalion commander said we're going to drive tanks up into the middle of Baghdad," said Capt. Jason Conroy, an Army officer who took part in the operation. "I told the lieutenants and they all dropped their [briefing] books."
NEWS
April 23, 2003 | David Zucchino, Times Staff Writer
A team of Army civil affairs soldiers Tuesday found $112 million in U.S. currency sealed inside seven animal kennels, bringing to $768 million the total cash uncovered in recent days in a wooded neighborhood of mansions and rose gardens where top Baath Party and Republican Guard officials once lived. Military officers said the money apparently was left by senior Iraqi officials who were fleeing the American invasion and were unable to carry all the cash they had amassed. U.S.
WORLD
June 24, 2004 | John Balzar, Times Staff Writer
The Milky Way arcs overhead: a sweep of stars so vivid as to resemble glitter shot across the bone-dry desert sky. For all its dazzle, though, the galaxy offers barely a flicker of gauzy light to the sand and rock below. In military terms, there is only 1% illumination of the battlefield. Time to go hunting. Time to be hunted. The impending transfer of governing authority over Iraq fades to abstraction for Marines pressing the relentless war against insurgency and terrorism in Iraq.
WORLD
January 18, 2005 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
Improved technology and better planning before November's battle for Fallouja helped U.S. forces avoid the "friendly fire" casualties that have plagued other large-scale military operations, Marine Corps commanders say. Col. John Coleman, chief of staff for the Camp Pendleton-based 1st Marine Expeditionary Force, said new technology, rushed to Fallouja within days of the battle, allowed air and ground units to know the precise location of U.S. forces in real time.
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