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WORLD
April 13, 2010 | By Ned Parker and Usama Redha
Prime Minister Nouri Maliki, battling for another term in office, lashed out at Iraq's neighbors Monday for meddling in its affairs as political leaders negotiate the composition of a new government. The tough comments were broadcast on state TV and came as representatives of Iraqi parties tour the region. Some Middle East countries have issued statements in recent days on Iraq's ongoing negotiations. Without naming any neighboring countries, Maliki warned them not to intervene in Iraqi affairs.
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NATIONAL
February 18, 2014 | By David Zucchino
This post has been updated. See below for details. It was one of the most disturbing war crimes to emerge from the brutal conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan: U.S. Army Pfc. Steven Dale Green raped and killed a 14-year-old Iraqi girl in 2006 after shooting and killing her parents and younger sister. Then he and his combat buddies from a nearby U.S. Army checkpoint set the girl's corpse on fire. Green, 28, serving five life sentences, apparently has committed suicide eight years after the crimes.
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WORLD
March 20, 2009
WORLD
January 27, 2014 | By David S. Cloud
WASHINGTON - Iraq's embattled government will be allowed to buy and lease Apache attack helicopters to help fight a renewed insurgency after a U.S. lawmaker lifted his long-running objections to the deal, the Pentagon said Monday. The agreement allows Iraq to lease as many as six Apaches this year and purchase another two dozen for delivery over the next three years, officials said. Iraq's military hopes to use the aircraft against militants from the Al Qaeda-linked group Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, who have overrun parts of Iraq's Anbar province, including the capital, Ramadi, and the city of Fallouja.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 2009 | Jason Felch
In his final months in Iraq, love came unexpectedly to Maj. Steven Hutchison. His 11-man crew was running errands on an Army base near Basra when Hutchison ordered a lunch break. The transition team, whose job was to train Iraqi police and soldiers, pulled their armored vehicles into the base's Subway restaurant and ordered sandwiches. Hutchison paid, as was his wont, and gave the thumbs up to roll out, team members recall. But the logistics advisor threw back a thumbs down.
WORLD
September 8, 2009 | Ned Parker and Caesar Ahmed, Ahmed is a Times staff writer.
This night at the Hunting Club, Qassim Sultan doesn't come on till 1 a.m. Because he wants life to be like the old days. He wants people to dance till 5 in the morning. He just has to stand on the stage and they move for him, the way they did at parties on cruise boats down the Tigris River before the war. In the crowd, women who look like Bettie Page, all jet-black hair and thick blue eye shadow, dance with men in double-breasted khaki suits. A chain of couples swing their hands high and kick their feet, grinning giddily, perhaps slightly tipsy from the beers and whiskeys at their tables.
WORLD
January 27, 2014 | By David S. Cloud
WASHINGTON - Iraq's embattled government will be allowed to buy and lease Apache attack helicopters to help fight a renewed insurgency after a U.S. lawmaker lifted his long-running objections to the deal, the Pentagon said Monday. The agreement allows Iraq to lease as many as six Apaches this year and purchase another two dozen for delivery over the next three years, officials said. Iraq's military hopes to use the aircraft against militants from the Al Qaeda-linked group Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, who have overrun parts of Iraq's Anbar province, including the capital, Ramadi, and the city of Fallouja.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2013 | By Tony Perry
A military appeals court Wednesday tossed out the high-profile conviction of a Marine from Camp Pendleton for the killing of an unarmed Iraqi man in 2006 in Hamandiya, west of Baghdad. The Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces ruled that Larry Hutchins was improperly denied a lawyer when investigators in Iraq first began to question him about the killing. He was put in solitary confinement for seven days, according to his lawyer, Babu Kaza. "At that point he broke and informed NCIS (Naval Criminal Investigative Service)
WORLD
August 20, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Poland's prime minister says his country will offer asylum or a $40,000 payment to any Iraqi working for its military or police in Iraq. Prime Minister Donald Tusk said his government approved the plan. Poland has decided to withdraw its troops from Iraq in October. There is a fear that Iraqis who worked for the U.S. allies could become the target of attacks. Tusk said the plan covers Iraqi interpreters and other workers. He did not say how many people it would cover. Poland contributed troops to the 2003 invasion of Iraq and now has 900 there.
OPINION
August 10, 2004
Re "The Hand-Over That Wasn't," Commentary, Aug. 5: Why don't we require Bechtel and Halliburton et al to hire a huge number of Iraqi workers for the war reconstruction efforts? The Iraqi people need the work, cost much less, speak the language, know the technology and incite fewer insurgents. But hiring Iraqis is difficult. So, as Antonia Juhasz points out, Paul Bremer's rules allow our contractors to hire impoverished Army reservists at huge salaries who are barely qualified and inflame the locals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2014 | By Tony Perry
The Marine Corps has decided to retry a sergeant from Camp Pendleton who spent six years behind bars for his alleged role in killing an unarmed Iraqi civilian but whose case was overturned on appeal. Arraignment is set for Wednesday at Camp Pendleton for Sgt. Lawrence Hutchins, who has been free since a military court of appeals overturned his conviction on grounds he was improperly denied an attorney when investigators began to question him. Hutchins and his attorney had hoped the Marine Corps would drop the case and allow him to leave the service and return to civilian life.
WORLD
January 10, 2014 | By David S. Cloud
WASHINGTON - Zach Iscol was a Marine captain in 2004 when his platoon - a combined unit of 30 Iraqis and 20 Americans - seized the railroad station on the first night of the bloody battle of Fallouja. They spent a week kicking in doors and fighting house to house, block by block, in some of the toughest urban combat of America's eight-year war in Iraq. Half a dozen of Iscol's men were wounded, but dozens of Marines in other squads were killed. Today, with ground that Marines fought and died for under control of insurgents flying the banner of Al Qaeda, and growing fears of another civil war, Iscol admits he has deeply conflicting views about the U.S. military withdrawal from Iraq in 2011.
WORLD
January 6, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri Maliki urged the residents of Fallouja to expel Al Qaeda-aligned militants who seized the city last week or deal with an imminent attack by government forces to regain the Sunni Muslim stronghold, news agencies in Baghdad reported Monday. Although the statement issued by Maliki on his Shiite-led government's website appealed for troops to avoid striking civilian areas, it warned of the risks of a military onslaught and armed clash with the Sunni warriors of the Al Qaeda-affiliated Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, or ISIS.
WORLD
January 5, 2014 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - Secretary of State John F. Kerry pledged Sunday to "do everything that is possible" to help Iraqi government forces in an escalating battle against Al Qaeda-linked insurgents in the western province of Anbar, but he said the Obama administration will not send American troops back to Iraq. After heavy fighting, Sunni Muslim militants fighting under the banner of Al Qaeda reportedly have in effect taken control of Fallouja and secured large parts of Ramadi, the province's most important cities.
WORLD
December 26, 2013 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration has begun sending Hellfire missiles and surveillance drone aircraft to Iraq to help the government battle an expanding threat from local Al Qaeda-affiliated militants, U.S. officials said, the first such assistance since the American withdrawal from Iraq in 2011. Responding to an appeal from Baghdad, the administration sent 75 air-to-ground Hellfire missiles this month and is preparing to send ScanEagle surveillance drones early next year to counter intensifying attacks by fighters of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, officials said.
NATIONAL
November 16, 2013 | By Soumya Karlamangla
A U.S. soldier has been charged with two counts of premeditated murder in the killing of two Iraqi civilians. The charges against Army Sgt. 1st Class Michael Barbera, 31, stem from an alleged shooting of two civilians near the village of As Sadah in Diyala Province in March 2007. Barbera was charged Wednesday at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson in Alaska, U.S. Army Public Affairs Officer Major Johnpaul Arnold told the Los Angeles Times. The incident in which Barbera is accused was first made public by  an investigation by the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review in Pennsylvania last December: "AS SADAH, Iraq - Shortly before noon on March 6, 2007, Small Kill Team leader Michael Barbera rose from his squad's position in high grass in a palm grove here and shot two teenage cattle herders.
OPINION
September 9, 2005
Re "Sadr City Success Story," Column One, Sept. 7 Thank you for finally publishing something positive about our presence in Iraq. Although I think the majority of Americans feel that we went to war on pretexts, we started a job and we have to finish it. Another article in the same issue was about the Iraqi army taking control of the town of Najaf, which is also a very positive thing. JO ANN MICHETTI Rancho Palos Verdes It seems a large portion of the population cannot intellectually distinguish between supporting U.S. troops and opposing our president.
WORLD
February 4, 2010 | By Ned Parker
In jail, Sarah had imagined herself sitting on Oprah's stage. The talk show host would listen sympathetically to the Iraqi widow's story. The audience would applaud as she told how she had made hardened militants cry while she helped grill them for the U.S. military. They would know, despite the rumors, that she had never betrayed the Americans. Now that she was free, Sarah concentrated on a letter: "In the name of God, Dear Oprah, peace be upon you," she typed. "I'm sure you're going to be a little surprised because a lady from Iraq is writing to you, a woman from America.
WORLD
November 1, 2013 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - Facing a deadly resurgence of Al Qaeda in Iraq, President Obama signaled Friday that he would begin increasing U.S. military support for Baghdad after five years of reducing it. The new U.S. plan represents a remarkable shift for Obama, whose administration trumpeted the 2011 withdrawal of the last U.S. troops from Iraq as a major achievement and has since shifted its attention to other regional challenges, such as Syria, Egypt and...
OPINION
October 24, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
In 2007, Congress created the Special Immigrant Visa program to help Iraqis and Afghans who had risked their lives to work for the American government during the wars in their countries. Thousands of former interpreters, drivers and other contractors applied, many of them worried about reprisals from fellow citizens and confident that the United States would help them begin a new life in America. More than five years after the program began, however, less than half of the visas set aside for the program - 5,000 annually for the last five years, plus more for family members - have been issued.
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