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Iraqi Elections

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OPINION
January 13, 2005
Re "Scowcroft Skeptical on Iraq Vote," Jan. 7: While we are reminded daily that the upcoming elections in Iraq are crucial, insurgents seem to be able to move freely throughout the capital and have increased their attacks. We are told to expect more attacks and that the enemy is resourceful and smart, changing tactics to meet new realities on the ground. I have no military training, so could someone explain to me why more troops would not help quell the violence, assist the Iraqis and respond more effectively to intelligence?
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
May 4, 2010 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
Iraqi election officials on Monday launched a recount of votes cast in Baghdad during March elections but almost immediately drew fire from a key supporter of Prime Minister Nouri Maliki, whose party initially requested the second tally. The dispute further dimmed prospects for the quick formation of a new government. Iraq's independent election commission said it would take "two weeks or even three" to finish the recount. Iraqis and Western observers fear stretching out the formation of the new government could further allow security to deteriorate and endanger a plan to pull about 50,000 American troops out of the country by September.
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OPINION
December 17, 2005
First the constitution is formulated, and now free democratic elections are successfully held in Iraq (Dec. 16). More than 10 million Iraqis (70% of the population) went to the polls in a war-torn country to exercise their freedom that was so brutally suppressed under Saddam Hussein. The story is far from complete, and the new parliamentary government still faces many challenges, but it is the conviction of President Bush and the courage of the U.S. armed forces that have given hope to the people of Iraq.
WORLD
February 21, 2010 | By Liz Sly
A leading Sunni party announced Saturday that it will boycott Iraq's upcoming elections because its leader was barred from participating, casting into doubt the inclusiveness of a vote that the U.S. military hopes will finally stabilize the country enough for its troops to go home. The Iraqi National Dialogue Front, whose leader, Saleh Mutlak, has been forbidden to run because of his alleged expressions of sympathy for Saddam Hussein's Baath Party, cited what it called "Iranian interference" for its decision not to participate in the March 7 parliamentary elections.
NEWS
November 28, 2004 | Robert H. Reid, Associated Press Writer
Leading Iraqi politicians called Friday for a six-month delay in the Jan. 30 election because of the spiraling violence as U.S. forces uncovered more bodies in the northern city of Mosul, apparent victims of an intimidation campaign by insurgents against Iraq's fledgling security forces.
OPINION
January 28, 2005
Re "Which Way Out?" editorial, Jan. 27: U.S. officials say American troops will stay until Iraq can protect itself. But since President Bush also has said that the election will create an independent Iraqi democratic government, how will that operate? If the new Iraqi leader says the U.S. troops should leave Iraq, the Bush administration will claim the election was not valid. If the new Iraqi leader says the troops should continue their "occupation duties," then the world will see the new leader as our puppet reporting to the White House.
WORLD
September 25, 2004 | Ashraf Khalil and Patrick J. McDonnell, Times Staff Writers
Iraqi and United Nations officials have little room for error as they confront the challenge of pulling together credible parliamentary elections in a violence-ravaged nation with no history of democracy. Interim Prime Minister Iyad Allawi, who has been on a U.S. tour, pledged Friday that elections would be held as scheduled in January. And speaking a day after Defense Secretary Donald H.
WORLD
December 30, 2005 | From Associated Press
An international team agreed Thursday to review Iraq's parliamentary elections, a decision lauded by Sunni Muslim Arab and secular Shiite groups that have staged repeated protests complaining of fraud and intimidation. The International Mission for Iraqi Elections team made the decision despite a United Nations observer's endorsement of the Dec. 15 vote, which gave the Shiite religious bloc a big lead in preliminary returns.
WORLD
November 4, 2004 | From Reuters
Hungary will withdraw its 300 troops from Iraq by the end of March, government officials said Wednesday. Hungary is the first of the new European Union states that had joined the U.S.-led occupation of Iraq to announce a formal withdrawal date, although the mandate of the troops, who form a transport battalion, had been due to expire at year's end. The new withdrawal date will require a two-thirds majority vote in parliament.
OPINION
January 12, 2005 | Karim Khutar Almusawi, Karim Khutar Almusawi is the representative in Washington of the Supreme Council for Islamic Revolution in Iraq, a leading Shiite political party.
With only a little more than two weeks to go before Jan. 30, there are still some people who want to postpone the Iraqi elections. But that would be a terrible mistake. For one thing, the Iraqi people are longing for democracy after decades of dictatorship and oppression, and they are not inclined to wait much longer. This was confirmed by a survey conducted by the International Republican Institute in December, showing that 67.4% of Iraqis support going forward with the elections as scheduled.
WORLD
January 20, 2010 | By Liz Sly
The barring of hundreds of mostly Sunni candidates from participating in Iraq's upcoming elections is testing the limits of U.S. influence in Iraq even as American troops prepare to draw down later in the year. U.S. diplomacy has shifted into high gear in recent days in an attempt to pressure Iraqi government officials into finding a way out of a crisis that many fear could seriously destabilize the country both before and after the election. The 515 barred candidates -- the number keeps growing -- belong mostly to Sunni Arab and secularist parties that oppose the dominance of Shiite religious parties in the current government.
WORLD
November 19, 2009 | Liz Sly and Raheem Salman
One of Iraq's vice presidents vetoed the country's new election law Wednesday, throwing into fresh doubt the feasibility of holding crucial national balloting in January and possibly disrupting the withdrawal next year of U.S. troops. Vice President Tariq Hashimi, a Sunni Arab, carried out his threat to veto the law because, he said, it does not provide for enough seats to represent Iraqi refugees who fled the violence of recent years, most of them living in Syria and Jordan. A majority of the refugees are Sunni Muslims.
WORLD
June 16, 2008 | Ned Parker and Raheem Salman, Times Staff Writers
Members of Shiite Muslim cleric Muqtada Sadr's political bloc announced Sunday that the group would not compete as a party in coming local elections but would endorse candidates. The decision appeared aimed at allowing the Sadr movement to play a role in the Iraqi elections despite a government threat to bar the bloc from fielding candidates if it did not first dissolve its militia.
WORLD
March 1, 2008 | Doyle McManus and Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writers
The Bush administration believes a halt in troop reductions in Iraq after July is needed in part to ensure a large enough force is present to provide security for local elections, a senior administration official said Friday. By tying troop levels to Iraq's provincial elections, officials in effect established a new milestone to guide U.S. policy during President Bush's last months in office.
WORLD
December 30, 2005 | From Associated Press
An international team agreed Thursday to review Iraq's parliamentary elections, a decision lauded by Sunni Muslim Arab and secular Shiite groups that have staged repeated protests complaining of fraud and intimidation. The International Mission for Iraqi Elections team made the decision despite a United Nations observer's endorsement of the Dec. 15 vote, which gave the Shiite religious bloc a big lead in preliminary returns.
OPINION
December 17, 2005
First the constitution is formulated, and now free democratic elections are successfully held in Iraq (Dec. 16). More than 10 million Iraqis (70% of the population) went to the polls in a war-torn country to exercise their freedom that was so brutally suppressed under Saddam Hussein. The story is far from complete, and the new parliamentary government still faces many challenges, but it is the conviction of President Bush and the courage of the U.S. armed forces that have given hope to the people of Iraq.
WORLD
June 16, 2008 | Ned Parker and Raheem Salman, Times Staff Writers
Members of Shiite Muslim cleric Muqtada Sadr's political bloc announced Sunday that the group would not compete as a party in coming local elections but would endorse candidates. The decision appeared aimed at allowing the Sadr movement to play a role in the Iraqi elections despite a government threat to bar the bloc from fielding candidates if it did not first dissolve its militia.
WORLD
October 28, 2005 | Solomon Moore, Times Staff Writer
This might be the last place one would expect to find support for Iyad Allawi, Iraq's former interim prime minister and a current parliamentary candidate. It was Allawi, after all, who authorized the massive, U.S.-led assault on this Sunni Arab-dominated city last year that destroyed half its buildings, displaced 150,000 people and resulted in the deaths of at least 1,200 alleged insurgents.
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