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March 19, 1991 | SHAWN POGATCHNIK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
CROSSMAGLEN, Northern Ireland--Welcome to South Armagh, front line of the Troubles and the Provisional IRA's home field. The British army has never publicly conceded being put on the defensive by the Irish Republican Army, but it comes closest to that here in the rolling boglands of South Armagh, the quintessentially Irish-Catholic "bandit country." The border of independent Ireland winds its way along 370 miles of brooks, hedge rows and pastureland.
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NEWS
July 10, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Barbed wire and steel barricades, bad weather and public fatigue combined to ensure that the most contentious parade of Northern Ireland's "marching season" ended Sunday without the violence of years past.
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NEWS
September 24, 1989
Irish Prime Minister Charles Haughey expressed "serious concern" at leaks of secret British government files about IRA suspects and ordered police to provide protection for those living in the Irish Republic. Haughey's comment was in response to publication by London's Independent newspaper of a list of names and photographs of 60 Irish Republican Army suspects. The newspaper said the list was handed anonymously to its Belfast office.
NEWS
July 5, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a land where religion and intolerance often walk hand in hand, the peaceful march by members of the Protestant Orange Order that took place Sunday was no small feat. The peace was carefully scripted, to be sure, secured by miles of barbed wire, hundreds of soldiers and police, and a ban on parading through a Roman Catholic neighborhood.
NEWS
July 10, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Barbed wire and steel barricades, bad weather and public fatigue combined to ensure that the most contentious parade of Northern Ireland's "marching season" ended Sunday without the violence of years past.
NEWS
July 5, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a land where religion and intolerance often walk hand in hand, the peaceful march by members of the Protestant Orange Order that took place Sunday was no small feat. The peace was carefully scripted, to be sure, secured by miles of barbed wire, hundreds of soldiers and police, and a ban on parading through a Roman Catholic neighborhood.
NEWS
September 27, 1989 | From Times wire services
Northern Ireland's security forces were hit by another intelligence leak scandal today when a former British soldier sent a newspaper details of 50 Irish Republican Army suspects. "I was a serving soldier in Northern Ireland. I just thought I would let you see how easy it is to obtain these photographs. I only kept them as a souvenir," he told the Daily Record newspaper in an anonymous note sent with the list.
NEWS
June 29, 1988 | Associated Press
A bomb exploded Tuesday under a school bus carrying at least a dozen children, injuring a 15-year-old girl and the driver, police said. The outlawed Irish Republican Army claimed responsibility. Several other children sustained minor cuts and bruises and were treated for shock at a hospital and later released, police said. At the time of the explosion at 8 a.m.
NEWS
November 24, 1987
More than 6,500 troops and police hunted for a massive Irish Republican Army weapons cache believed smuggled into the Irish Republic in four boatloads from the Mediterranean region in the last two years. Irish Justice Minister Gerry Collins said three shipments were loaded off the islands of Malta and Gozo and one was loaded off the shores of Libya. However, he said there was no proof that Libya was the supplier.
NEWS
March 19, 1991 | SHAWN POGATCHNIK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
CROSSMAGLEN, Northern Ireland--Welcome to South Armagh, front line of the Troubles and the Provisional IRA's home field. The British army has never publicly conceded being put on the defensive by the Irish Republican Army, but it comes closest to that here in the rolling boglands of South Armagh, the quintessentially Irish-Catholic "bandit country." The border of independent Ireland winds its way along 370 miles of brooks, hedge rows and pastureland.
NEWS
September 24, 1989
Irish Prime Minister Charles Haughey expressed "serious concern" at leaks of secret British government files about IRA suspects and ordered police to provide protection for those living in the Irish Republic. Haughey's comment was in response to publication by London's Independent newspaper of a list of names and photographs of 60 Irish Republican Army suspects. The newspaper said the list was handed anonymously to its Belfast office.
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