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Irene Dunne

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1986 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
It's a bit ironic that the County Museum of Art is calling its tribute (which starts Friday at the Bing Theater) to one of Hollywood's enduringly lovely ladies "The Best of Irene Dunne." It's unimaginable that Dunne ever gave anything less than her considerable best. Beyond her beauty and talent, Dunne's character and innate dignity allowed her a range remarkable at the height of Hollywood's golden era, in which most major stars more or less played themselves.
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REAL ESTATE
October 21, 2007 | Ruth Ryon, Special to The Times
ACTRESS Irene Dunne, who starred opposite the likes of Cary Grant and Spencer Tracy, lived for more than 40 years in a French colonial-style house on the site of this estate in Holmby Hills. After Dunne died at age 88 in 1990, her Paul Williams-designed home was razed, and this manor, designed by Kevin Clark, took its place. It was completed in 1997. Georgian-style with French accents, the house has inlaid marble floors, custom moldings and gold-leaf details.
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NEWS
July 18, 1985 | JODY JACOBS
Irene Dunne, the graceful comedienne, ultimate Southern lady, singer and actress par excellence has received awards galore plus five Academy Award nominations. "But this is the one I will cherish," she told us this week after being notified Monday that she is one of five winners of the 1985 Kennedy Center honors.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2002
In David Thomson's article on the homage paid to so-called women's pictures by "Far From Heaven" ("Back to the Days of Subversive Innocence," Oct. 27), he cites the two early versions of "Back Street" with Irene Dunne and Margaret Sullavan. But given the case he makes for the high-gloss, Technicolor films of Douglas Sirk, wouldn't it have made more sense to have also included the 1961 version of this Fannie Hurst story that starred Susan Hayward at her most long-suffering best, with a wardrobe by Jean Louis?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1985 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
"You don't have to do anything," Irene Dunne was saying. "You just sit and watch. It's quite wonderful. And they don't give you a clue as to what they're going to do. But they've been after me for weeks for baby pictures, pictures when I was 4, pictures of my mother, and of course they're getting clips from my movies."
REAL ESTATE
October 21, 2007 | Ruth Ryon, Special to The Times
ACTRESS Irene Dunne, who starred opposite the likes of Cary Grant and Spencer Tracy, lived for more than 40 years in a French colonial-style house on the site of this estate in Holmby Hills. After Dunne died at age 88 in 1990, her Paul Williams-designed home was razed, and this manor, designed by Kevin Clark, took its place. It was completed in 1997. Georgian-style with French accents, the house has inlaid marble floors, custom moldings and gold-leaf details.
NEWS
September 5, 1990 | From a Times Staff Writer
Irene Dunne, one of the top film stars of the 1930s and 1940s and a pioneer in establishing contract rights for Hollywood actors and actresses, died Tuesday at her Holmby Hills home of natural causes. She was 88.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2002
In David Thomson's article on the homage paid to so-called women's pictures by "Far From Heaven" ("Back to the Days of Subversive Innocence," Oct. 27), he cites the two early versions of "Back Street" with Irene Dunne and Margaret Sullavan. But given the case he makes for the high-gloss, Technicolor films of Douglas Sirk, wouldn't it have made more sense to have also included the 1961 version of this Fannie Hurst story that starred Susan Hayward at her most long-suffering best, with a wardrobe by Jean Louis?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1990 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
Good looks helped a lot but they were never quite enough, or quite enough for very long. Each of the great stars of the great days of Hollywood was unique. Irene Dunne, who died on Tuesday evening, was a classic, elegant beauty with a quiet dignity and a personal reserve that contrasted wonderfully with the madcap comedienne she sometimes played (against her own best judgment). The film faithful will have a choice of ways to remember her.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1999
The [American Film Institute's] selection of the top 25 screen legends of each gender prior to 1950 was even more bizarre than its 100 greatest films list (Morning Report, June 16). William Holden made a greater impact than Rudolph Valentino? Robert Mitchum over Harold Lloyd? Where did William S. Hart, Bing Crosby, Bob Hope, Gene Autry and Roy Rogers place? And while the Marx Brothers surely belonged on the list, what about Laurel & Hardy and Abbott & Costello? Lauren Bacall made sparks with Bogart, but there were no long lines for any of her films without Bogie.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1992
The Michael Russnow-Hal Elias correspondence about the honorary Oscar selections (Saturday Letters, Jan. 4, 11, 18) begins to open up the cumbersome process by which the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences grants its honorary awards. In my mind and as an academy member, the honorary Oscar is best served by acknowledging those artists who have been bypassed due to the vagaries of the regular awards procedure. In recent years, the academy has been shameful in not acknowledging the remaining great stars who made us love the movies, and the ill-conceived stagings of the Mary Pickford and Myrna Loy bestowals will most certainly make a potential honoree's current appearance a top selection factor.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1990 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
Good looks helped a lot but they were never quite enough, or quite enough for very long. Each of the great stars of the great days of Hollywood was unique. Irene Dunne, who died on Tuesday evening, was a classic, elegant beauty with a quiet dignity and a personal reserve that contrasted wonderfully with the madcap comedienne she sometimes played (against her own best judgment). The film faithful will have a choice of ways to remember her.
NEWS
September 5, 1990 | From a Times Staff Writer
Irene Dunne, one of the top film stars of the 1930s and 1940s and a pioneer in establishing contract rights for Hollywood actors and actresses, died Tuesday at her Holmby Hills home of natural causes. She was 88.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1999
The [American Film Institute's] selection of the top 25 screen legends of each gender prior to 1950 was even more bizarre than its 100 greatest films list (Morning Report, June 16). William Holden made a greater impact than Rudolph Valentino? Robert Mitchum over Harold Lloyd? Where did William S. Hart, Bing Crosby, Bob Hope, Gene Autry and Roy Rogers place? And while the Marx Brothers surely belonged on the list, what about Laurel & Hardy and Abbott & Costello? Lauren Bacall made sparks with Bogart, but there were no long lines for any of her films without Bogie.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1986 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
It's a bit ironic that the County Museum of Art is calling its tribute (which starts Friday at the Bing Theater) to one of Hollywood's enduringly lovely ladies "The Best of Irene Dunne." It's unimaginable that Dunne ever gave anything less than her considerable best. Beyond her beauty and talent, Dunne's character and innate dignity allowed her a range remarkable at the height of Hollywood's golden era, in which most major stars more or less played themselves.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1985 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
"You don't have to do anything," Irene Dunne was saying. "You just sit and watch. It's quite wonderful. And they don't give you a clue as to what they're going to do. But they've been after me for weeks for baby pictures, pictures when I was 4, pictures of my mother, and of course they're getting clips from my movies."
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