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Irene Oppenheim

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
Disabled people come in many different shapes, sizes, colors. They also come with a variety of voices. "The bottom line of 'Other Voices' is developing a disabled culture--in Los Angeles, all over the world," said actress Victoria Ann-Lewis, project director of the Other Voices Writing Workshop. The group will present a scene reading, open to the public, Monday at the Music Center Annex. "The disabled minority is not geographical, yet it's very repressed," she said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1993 | IRENE OPPENHEIM
When the American Indian Dance Theatre decides to add a work to its repertory, the process involves more than simply learning new steps. The company's new Kwakiutl mask dance is a case in point. The troupe went through a series of negotiations and journeys to include the ceremonial dance, a segment of the "Northwest Coast Suite" that forms part of the varied program the troupe will present Thursday at the Irvine Barclay Theatre.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1993 | IRENE OPPENHEIM
When the American Indian Dance Theatre decides to add a work to its repertory, the process involves more than simply learning new steps. The company's new Kwakiutl mask dance is a case in point. The troupe went through a series of negotiations and journeys to include the ceremonial dance, a segment of the "Northwest Coast Suite" that forms part of the varied program the troupe will present Thursday at the Irvine Barclay Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
Disabled people come in many different shapes, sizes, colors. They also come with a variety of voices. "The bottom line of 'Other Voices' is developing a disabled culture--in Los Angeles, all over the world," said actress Victoria Ann-Lewis, project director of the Other Voices Writing Workshop. The group will present a scene reading, open to the public, Monday at the Music Center Annex. "The disabled minority is not geographical, yet it's very repressed," she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2001 | CHARLES ORNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Music and singing replaced jackhammers and bulldozers Sunday as West Hollywood residents celebrated the grand reopening of Santa Monica Boulevard after a two-year rebuilding and beautification effort. "It's just been a mess," said Kristin Rey, an art gallery owner who brought her 6-year-old daughter to the party. "I don't think people really believed that it would ever be done, but I'm glad it is."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1985
Perhaps the controversy (Calendar Letters, May 19) over the film "The Gods Must Be Crazy" might be resolved by considering that its being a comedy full of "compassion and rare humanity," or a travesty "blatantly racist and paternalistic," may not be mutually exclusive. The film is not without its racist elements, but something else also is happening there that those who can't see past their indignation may have missed. Whatever the film maker's political or moral limitations, by the end of the movie a good percentage of the audience has developed an admiring fondness for the Bushman protagonist.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1991 | RAY LOYND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A little-known workshop that teams disabled actors with the mainstream theatrical community is staging an inventive show of original scenes loosely inspired by "King Lear" in the Gallery Theatre at Barnsdall Art Park. "Available Light," developed by the Available Light Writing Workshop, was written by people with disabilities, and about two-thirds of the 20-member cast is disabled.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1989 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
This is the 10th year that the Los Angeles Theatre Center (formerly known as the Los Angeles Actors' Theatre when the tradition of this festival of premieres began) has had one wallop of a "Big Weekend."
OPINION
June 29, 2002
Re "Make L.A. a Free Art Zone," editorial, June 22: I heartily endorse The Times' call for free access to all museums. As the director of Grand Performances, L.A.'s premier free performing arts program, I can tell you from our experience that cost--not upbringing, not socioeconomic class, not education--determines who will attend all types of performing arts events. Our audiences for ballet, folk and modern dance, opera and theater, in addition to the jazz and world music that we present, are filled with people from all neighborhoods in Southern California.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1988 | DON SHIRLEY
The western end of Santa Monica Boulevard may soon become Comedy Central. Second City, the country's most famous troupe of sketch actors and improvisational comics, plans to open a branch at the Mayfair Theatre in Santa Monica, probably in mid-December. It will be across the street from a new 350-seat branch of the stand-up comedy club, the Improvisation, which may open in a few weeks.
NEWS
June 30, 1995 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the forest Many trees Big and small Old and young They are talking To each other Except One tree Alone Silent Deaf. . . . The poem is "The Squirrel and the Tree." The poet is Roxana Hernandez. She is 13 and she is deaf. She's never seen a deaf tree, of course, but she wondered, "What would it be like?" She'd never written a poem, either, until joining a creative writing class taught by deaf actor Bob Hiltermann at Marlton, a public special education school in the Crenshaw District.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1989 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
Buying theater tickets: How tough can it get? Pretty tough, in a city as spread out as Los Angeles, where you can't easily walk up to a box office and purchase the seats you want. You would think that telephone sales would be made easy. They are-- if you have a credit card and are willing to pay a surcharge for seats whose exact location you won't know until you sit in them.
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