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ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2010 | By Tim Rutten, Los Angeles Times
The ancient Irish believed a poet could kill with his satire. There's a memory of that belief in Roddy Doyle's deeply engaging comedic novels in which the poetry of everyday urban Irish speech is used to deal fatal blows against injustice and hurtful illusion. In his Barrytown Trilogy — "The Commitments," "The Snapper" and "The Van" — chronicling events in the life of the fictional Rabbitte clan, Doyle's brilliantly realized dialogue was hurled hilariously against the wall of social indifference with which contemporary Dubliners had surrounded the working-class neighborhoods and suburbs of their city's north side, where he has lived and taught for many years.
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FOOD
October 27, 2012 | By Jonathan Gold, Los Angeles Times Restaurant Critic
Have you been to Tom Bergin's Tavern lately? No - not Molly Malone's, the pub with the bands; the other one on Fairfax, a few blocks south, with the Irish coffee and the old Bing Crosby vibe. Bergin's has been a fascinating place since Brandon Boudet took it over last summer, partly because you're unsure whether you have fallen prey to an elaborate put-on or whether you really have stepped back into Raymond Chandler's L.A., whether the names of the paper shamrocks still stapled to the ceiling are of authentic provenance and whether the dinginess of the barroom is real.
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BOOKS
October 27, 1985
In researching a book on Irish-American influence in Hollywood and the Irish image on screen, I welcome information on: (1) any Irish-related film personality, especially those with maternal links (e.g. Judy Garland, Adolph Menjou); (2) Irish movie executives such as Winnie Sheehan (20th Century Fox), Eddie Mannix (MGM) and (3) Hollywood's Irish colony. JOAN P. SULLIVAN 230 Naples Terrace Riverdale, N.Y. 10463
NEWS
July 16, 2012 | By Michael McGough
A zillion years ago I wrote an article for the American Journalism Review titled "The Blarney Beat: The Press Just Can't Get Enough of Those Witty, Charming Irish Americans. " My point was that, almost uniquely, the alleged charm of the Irish was a stylistic crutch for writers of human interest stories (and editorials), notwithstanding the fact that “Irish wit” ranged from the clubhouse humor of Speaker of the House Tip O'Neill to the subtleties of his distant playwright cousin Eugene.
NEWS
January 13, 1985 | John Goldman and William Tuohy, This article was written by Times Staff Writers JOHN J. GOLDMAN in New York and Boston and WILLIAM TUOHY in London and Belfast.
The moon was just a sliver behind ominous low-lying clouds as the fishing trawler Marita Ann, running without lights, plowed through stormy seas toward the rugged Kerry coast of Ireland. Suddenly, out of the blustery September night, two patrol boats of the Irish navy appeared and ordered the trawler to stop for boarding.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1996
Re "The Immigrants' View of Education," Opinion, Aug. 25: Will The Times next have the Irish poet Seamus Heaney comment on Irish American mobility? Carlos Monsivais writes wonderfully and insightfully on Mexico and Mexicans. He is out of his league when talking about the new breed of folk called the Mexican American. The mind and spirit of a Mexican American child are formed on this side of the border by hybrid cultural influences unknown to the likes of Mexican intellectuals. These children are not Mexicans who happen to be American citizens.
SPORTS
June 12, 2004
How in the world does Major League Soccer allow Chivas USA to articulate a hiring philosophy that blatantly states: "We're going to look around and try to recruit mostly Mexican American or Hispanic players." I realize their fan base is Latin, and they are free to hire any player they want to. However, to come out and flaunt this discrimination is ugly. Maybe this type of racism goes in Mexico, but it sure doesn't go here. How well would it be received if a pro sports team in the U.S. said it was going to look around and recruit Caucasian or say Irish American players?
OPINION
April 2, 1995
Whoever wrote your March 24 editorial suggesting that Art Snyder may not be coming back from his visit with his daughter in Ireland must not have lived in Los Angeles very long. Thanks to The Times, Angelenos have learned a lot about this red-headed Irish-American ex-Marine in the past, including every intimate detail of his private life. But the one thing that we have learned for sure is that Snyder never turns his back on a fight. He says he would not miss the opportunity to be present when the case against him is tossed out, and he can get on to his next big battle--against cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2009 | reuters
Irish American dance master Michael Flatley is back on stage after years of suffering from a "mystery virus," thanks to a treatment by an Irish "energy healer," Irish media quoted Flatley as saying Wednesday. Flatley, born in the United States in 1958 of Irish heritage, rose to fame as a member of the "Riverdance" troupe that helped propel Irish dancing into the global spotlight and later opened his own "Lord of the Dance" show. He was taken to a hospital in London in 2006 with a virus that forced him to cancel the European tour of his "Celtic Tiger" show, a dramatization of Ireland's history.
NEWS
July 28, 1996
I am an American who enjoys watching U.S. athletes win gold medals. However, as an Irish American who took special interest in the wonderful performance of Michelle Smith, I was saddened and disappointed in the reaction to her victories. There is not a shred of evidence suggesting Ms. Smith used performance-enhancing drugs. Is it really so difficult to imagine that a 26-year-old veteran swimmer could peak at the perfect moment? Is is so difficult to accept that Janet Evans could have a bad day?
NEWS
May 23, 2011 | By Christi Parsons, Washington Bureau
President Obama arrived here Monday to begin a weeklong visit to Europe, trying to forge a common way forward with allies facing two wars, a Middle East in turmoil, and economies still struggling to recover from the 2008 collapse. But before he gets down to the hard stuff, Obama will indulge in a bit of the Irish-roots politics so beloved by American presidents who trace their ancestry back to this island of emigrants. Shortly after arriving Monday morning, Obama visited Irish President Mary McAleese's residence, where he planted an oak tree -- not far from a sequoia planted by John F. Kennedy in 1963.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2010 | By Tim Rutten, Los Angeles Times
The ancient Irish believed a poet could kill with his satire. There's a memory of that belief in Roddy Doyle's deeply engaging comedic novels in which the poetry of everyday urban Irish speech is used to deal fatal blows against injustice and hurtful illusion. In his Barrytown Trilogy — "The Commitments," "The Snapper" and "The Van" — chronicling events in the life of the fictional Rabbitte clan, Doyle's brilliantly realized dialogue was hurled hilariously against the wall of social indifference with which contemporary Dubliners had surrounded the working-class neighborhoods and suburbs of their city's north side, where he has lived and taught for many years.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2009 | reuters
Irish American dance master Michael Flatley is back on stage after years of suffering from a "mystery virus," thanks to a treatment by an Irish "energy healer," Irish media quoted Flatley as saying Wednesday. Flatley, born in the United States in 1958 of Irish heritage, rose to fame as a member of the "Riverdance" troupe that helped propel Irish dancing into the global spotlight and later opened his own "Lord of the Dance" show. He was taken to a hospital in London in 2006 with a virus that forced him to cancel the European tour of his "Celtic Tiger" show, a dramatization of Ireland's history.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2007 | Tim Rutten, Times Staff Writer
Anne Enright is part of a remarkable generation of Irish writers who have helped transform their country's literature as surely as globalization has transformed their nation's economy. In some ways, the process has been remarkably similar -- an enthusiasm for and immersion in foreign influence carried home to make Ireland's insularity no more than a geographic fact, at last.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2006 | Anne-Marie O'Connor, Times Staff Writer
WHEN veteran Irish stage and film actor Fionnula Flanagan met with producers and writers of Showtime's "Brotherhood" to discuss her portrayal of the Irish-born working class matriarch of the show, Rose Caffee, one of the first questions she asked the producers was, "What does she do for sex?" "Everybody went, 'Whoa! Rose has affairs?' " Flanagan recalled, a smile lighting up her bright blue eyes. "Just because I was the matriarch. I said, 'Get over it!'
SPORTS
June 12, 2004
How in the world does Major League Soccer allow Chivas USA to articulate a hiring philosophy that blatantly states: "We're going to look around and try to recruit mostly Mexican American or Hispanic players." I realize their fan base is Latin, and they are free to hire any player they want to. However, to come out and flaunt this discrimination is ugly. Maybe this type of racism goes in Mexico, but it sure doesn't go here. How well would it be received if a pro sports team in the U.S. said it was going to look around and recruit Caucasian or say Irish American players?
BOOKS
March 18, 1990 | NOEL O'HARA, O'Hara is a free-lance writer.
A Year ago, in a front-page article in the New York Times Book Review, Mary Gordon wrote that for some time she had been unable to explain why "the country of Goldsmith and Swift, of Maria Edgeworth and Oscar Wilde and George Bernard Shaw, above all the country of Yeats and Joyce, the country of O'Casey and Synge, of O'Connor and O'Faolain produced so little in its American branch." The writer went on to acknowledge O'Neill, Fitzgerald, James T. Farrell, J. F.
NEWS
March 7, 2000 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Denis Hamill's novels aren't mysteries, but there's a mystery in them: Why must good men be treated so badly? In "House on Fire," a Brooklyn firefighter's dream of a muscular but warm Irish American family life was destroyed when his foreign-born wife left him without explanation. Now, in "Fork in the Road," a young filmmaker from Queens stakes his career and his happiness on what seems to be a losing bet: Gina Furey, a lovely but larcenous Irish gypsy.
OPINION
May 18, 2003 | Gregory Rodriguez, Gregory Rodriguez, a contributing editor to Opinion, is a senior fellow at New America Foundation.
In contemporary America, ethnicity -- especially white ethnicity -- seems to have become a matter of choice. Collective white identities -- German American, Italian American, Polish American, Irish American and so on -- increasingly serve the whims of the individual. And what's happening to white ethnicity is spreading. The old arbiters of ethnic authenticity are losing their authority. In the new frontier of ethnic identities, you are who you say you are.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Daniel Kelly, 71, patriarch of the Irish American folk, rock and pop group the Kelly Family, died Monday in Germany after a long illness. The Kelly Family--four sons and two daughters--is a phenomenon in Europe, where they have sold more than 15 million albums and perform at sold-out concerts. Their 1994 album "Over the Hump" sold 4.5 million copies.
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