Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsIrish Culture
IN THE NEWS

Irish Culture

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Eoin McKiernan, 89, founder of the Irish American Cultural Institute who was credited with leading efforts to revive and preserve Irish culture and language in the United States, died Sunday in St. Paul, Minn. The cause of death was not reported. McKiernan's passion for Irish culture inspired him to establish the institute in 1962 while serving as chairman of the English department at the College of St. Thomas in St. Paul. He said he wanted people to see beyond the hoopla of St.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2012 | By Chris Barton
This just in: The Irish really know their way around telling a story. Yet despite America's eagerness to embrace Irish culture for one Guinness-addled day every March, few are familiar with many of the island's titans of the written word beyond an ambitiously purchased copy of "Ulysses," a tear-stained "Angela's Ashes" or perhaps stumbling through the Pogues' "Fairytale of New York" during the holidays. Consider celebrated Irish playwright Tom Murphy, whose name falls below the radar in mainstream American pop culture.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1996 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
On stage at the Pantages Theatre, the "Riverdance" chorus is singing an Irish-immigrant prayer for freedom--"How they hunger for liberty, feel their hatred of poverty"--every note pure, every word strangely uninflected, as if the voices are computer simulations detailing a bank balance. Soon afterward, we'll see flamenco soloist Maria Pages, who does just about everything here except bother to dance from the heart.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Eoin McKiernan, 89, founder of the Irish American Cultural Institute who was credited with leading efforts to revive and preserve Irish culture and language in the United States, died Sunday in St. Paul, Minn. The cause of death was not reported. McKiernan's passion for Irish culture inspired him to establish the institute in 1962 while serving as chairman of the English department at the College of St. Thomas in St. Paul. He said he wanted people to see beyond the hoopla of St.
NEWS
August 15, 1985
The UCLA Folklore and Mythology Center has published its first Irish Cultural Directory for Southern California. The 150-page book, the result of more than a year of research, lists sources of Irish culture, art, education and commerce. America's largest Irish community lives in California, according to researchers.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1996
I thought Lewis Segal's review of "Riverdance" somewhat short-sighted (" 'Riverdance': Irish Culture on the Hoof," Nov. 18). "Riverdance" is a "show" aimed at entertaining a diverse audience, not an esoteric dance performance. Judging by the ovation it received on Saturday night, I think it achieved this goal. I saw "Riverdance" in London last year and felt that the performance at the Pantages had been modified for L.A. audiences: There appeared to be less dancing and too many breaks to allow time for the audience to applaud, and the stage settings were unnecessarily realistic.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2012 | By Chris Barton
This just in: The Irish really know their way around telling a story. Yet despite America's eagerness to embrace Irish culture for one Guinness-addled day every March, few are familiar with many of the island's titans of the written word beyond an ambitiously purchased copy of "Ulysses," a tear-stained "Angela's Ashes" or perhaps stumbling through the Pogues' "Fairytale of New York" during the holidays. Consider celebrated Irish playwright Tom Murphy, whose name falls below the radar in mainstream American pop culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1996 | MARTIN LANDAU, Martin Landau won the 1994 best supporting actor Academy Award for "Ed Wood." He starred in many other films, including "Crimes and Misdemeanors" and "Pinocchio." He is a partner in Silver Street Productions
Some things are incontrovertible. The sun rises in the east, a triangle has three sides and "Riverdance" is an enthralling expression of the glory of the human spirit and of the power of art to convey beauty. Concerning his review " 'Riverdance': Irish Culture on the Hoof" (Calendar, Nov. 18), I would like to ask Times dance critic Lewis Segal . . . in the immortal words of Jay Leno's greeting to Hugh Grant . . . what the hell were you thinking? I cannot sit quietly and allow Mr.
NEWS
March 17, 1986 | MARIE MONTGOMERY, Times Staff Writer
There was a man from Roscommon who used to get lonely for his brothers in America around St. Patrick's Day, so he'd go to the pub each year and have three drinks--one for him and one for each of his brothers. Well, one year he came in and ordered just two drinks. The bartender, puzzled, asked him: "John, why are you having only two drinks? Did one of your brothers die?" John replied, "Oh, no. I gave it up for Lent."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2001 | DAVID PIERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Irish-born William Mulholland probably never imagined that 40,000 people would be celebrating Irish culture and heritage in the San Fernando Valley nearly a century after the city engineer established Los Angeles' municipal water system. Mulholland is a prime example of Irish American contributions to Southern California and one of the reasons that 1.
NEWS
May 6, 2004 | Bernadette Murphy, Special to The Times
In his seminal anthology "The Art of the Personal Essay," editor Phillip Lopate introduces an essay on walking by Henry David Thoreau by telling us that the essay form itself "is akin to taking a mental stroll." Thanks to its malleability, the essay allows a writer the freedom to saunter about, to take readers along on a sometimes meandering but always thoughtful journey.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2001 | DAVID PIERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Irish-born William Mulholland probably never imagined that 40,000 people would be celebrating Irish culture and heritage in the San Fernando Valley nearly a century after the city engineer established Los Angeles' municipal water system. Mulholland is a prime example of Irish American contributions to Southern California and one of the reasons that 1.
NEWS
March 17, 2000 | MARY McNAMARA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's no other day like it in any cultural or religious calendar. On March 17 of every year, one of the largest, most powerful nations in the world pays homage to a small, damp island with a population that barely scrapes past 5 million. Out come the shamrock pins, the tricolored flags and "Erin Go Bragh" T-shirts. Parades snake through multiethnic crowds lining the main streets of every major city, fueled by pipe-and-drum strains of "Danny Boy" and "McNamara's Band."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The "Spirit of Ireland" show at Royce Hall on Wednesday night was a pleasant view of Irish culture beyond the high-powered production potency of "Riverdance" and "Titanic." Instead of massed dancers and nautical romance, the production--which featured the RTE Irish National Radio Orchestra and a supporting cast of dancers, a piper, a soprano and a narrator--kept it simple, liberally mixing traditional tunes, a few popular ballads, a sprinkling of Irish humor and some vigorous step-dancing.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1997 | DON HECKMAN and SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With St. Patrick's Day approaching on Monday, this weekend will be an occasion for wearin' the green, lifting a few pints with friends and claiming ancestry, however dubious, with the Emerald Isle. Not surprising, given that one in six Americans can trace their ancestry to Ireland. Beyond the green beer and leprechauns, the high points in the numerous celebrations taking place around the Southland will be the music.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1996 | MARTIN LANDAU, Martin Landau won the 1994 best supporting actor Academy Award for "Ed Wood." He starred in many other films, including "Crimes and Misdemeanors" and "Pinocchio." He is a partner in Silver Street Productions
Some things are incontrovertible. The sun rises in the east, a triangle has three sides and "Riverdance" is an enthralling expression of the glory of the human spirit and of the power of art to convey beauty. Concerning his review " 'Riverdance': Irish Culture on the Hoof" (Calendar, Nov. 18), I would like to ask Times dance critic Lewis Segal . . . in the immortal words of Jay Leno's greeting to Hugh Grant . . . what the hell were you thinking? I cannot sit quietly and allow Mr.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The "Spirit of Ireland" show at Royce Hall on Wednesday night was a pleasant view of Irish culture beyond the high-powered production potency of "Riverdance" and "Titanic." Instead of massed dancers and nautical romance, the production--which featured the RTE Irish National Radio Orchestra and a supporting cast of dancers, a piper, a soprano and a narrator--kept it simple, liberally mixing traditional tunes, a few popular ballads, a sprinkling of Irish humor and some vigorous step-dancing.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1997 | DON HECKMAN and SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With St. Patrick's Day approaching on Monday, this weekend will be an occasion for wearin' the green, lifting a few pints with friends and claiming ancestry, however dubious, with the Emerald Isle. Not surprising, given that one in six Americans can trace their ancestry to Ireland. Beyond the green beer and leprechauns, the high points in the numerous celebrations taking place around the Southland will be the music.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1996
I thought Lewis Segal's review of "Riverdance" somewhat short-sighted (" 'Riverdance': Irish Culture on the Hoof," Nov. 18). "Riverdance" is a "show" aimed at entertaining a diverse audience, not an esoteric dance performance. Judging by the ovation it received on Saturday night, I think it achieved this goal. I saw "Riverdance" in London last year and felt that the performance at the Pantages had been modified for L.A. audiences: There appeared to be less dancing and too many breaks to allow time for the audience to applaud, and the stage settings were unnecessarily realistic.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1996 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
On stage at the Pantages Theatre, the "Riverdance" chorus is singing an Irish-immigrant prayer for freedom--"How they hunger for liberty, feel their hatred of poverty"--every note pure, every word strangely uninflected, as if the voices are computer simulations detailing a bank balance. Soon afterward, we'll see flamenco soloist Maria Pages, who does just about everything here except bother to dance from the heart.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|