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April 2, 1996 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While most Hollywood actresses will do just about anything to land the young and glamorous roles, what Chicago stage actress Irma P. Hall wants above all is to play old and infirm. Since becoming an actress full-time at about 40 years old --after a career as a teacher--Hall, 61, has played a steady stream of octo- and nonagenarians. And that's just the way she likes it. "I have a friend who's been in plays with me who says 'I'm too vain to do what you do'," Hall says with a big laugh.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1996 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While most Hollywood actresses will do just about anything to land the young and glamorous roles, what Chicago stage actress Irma P. Hall wants above all is to play old and infirm. Since becoming an actress full-time at about 40 years old --after a career as a teacher--Hall, 61, has played a steady stream of octo- and nonagenarians. And that's just the way she likes it. "I have a friend who's been in plays with me who says 'I'm too vain to do what you do'," Hall says with a big laugh.
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April 12, 1998 | Kevin Thomas
In Richard Pearce's poignant, upbeat 1996 film Robert Duvall (right) and James Earl Jones (left) portray Arkansas-born half-brothers who grew up on opposite sides of the color line, discovering late in life that they are both sons of the same black mother. Duvall and Jones give strong performances here, but stealing several scenes from the screen veterans is Irma P. Hall, who portrays the brothers' Aunt T (Showtime Sunday at 6 a.m. and 6 p.m.).
NEWS
August 30, 1998 | Kevin Thomas
This warm and embracing 1997 family drama, was written and directed by George Tillman Jr, who drew inspiration from his own Milwaukee family. For 40 years, the now-widowed Mother Joe (the majestic Irma P. Hall, center) has served a sumptuous Southern-style Sunday dinner in her fine old Chicago home and in doing so has held together her family of three daughters (Vanessa L. Williams, left, Vivica A. Fox, right, and Nia Long) and their families. (HBO Tuesday at 8 p.m.).
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2004 | From Associated Press
Although the film opened nationally last week, it wasn't until Wednesday that Irma P. Hall was able to see "The Ladykillers," in which she stars opposite Tom Hanks. She has been recovering in a Chicago convalescent center from open-heart surgery, a broken arm and a crushed ankle, the result of a January car crash. "I loved the whole thing," the 68-year-old actress said after the private screening, which she attended with friends. "You never really know until you see it on the screen."
NEWS
September 9, 2004 | Susan King
The Ladykillers Tom Hanks, Irma P. Hall Touchstone, $30 Though it is sacrilege to remake the classic 1955 Ealing British comedy that starred Alec Guinness as the eccentric head of a group of misfit bank robbers, at least this new version has quite a few things in its favor. Iconoclastic Joel and Ethan Coen direct the comedy with much perverse style and a macabre sense of humor. Hanks seems to be channeling Foghorn Leghorn and Col. Sanders as the con man; Irma P.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2001 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, TIMES TELEVISION CRITIC
UPN's spooky new "All Souls" is Dr. Kildare meets Nosferatu. Talk about a hospital with health-care problems. All Souls, the 300-year-old Boston research and teaching facility where Dr. Michael Grace (Grayson McCouch) is a first-year resident, has a spate of female patients dying inexplicably, demons lurking in the shadows, a 19th century woman pushing a baby carriage down dark corridors and a lab where squiggly worms and maggots mess up a young orderly. Unspeakable things are happening.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2001 | LEE MARGULIES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don't know much about Kwanzaa? Neither do the kids on "Rugrats"--until tonight's episode (8:30 p.m., Nickelodeon), when the Carmichael family's jovial Aunt T. arrives and insists on celebrating it. There was a time when you could have predicted what would come next: a camouflaged lecture on African American heritage followed by a message about the need for tolerance and respect. It's a mark of how sophisticated children's programming can be these days that the script by Lisa D.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1994 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Flyin' West," Pearl Cleage's post-Civil War tale of African Americans who founded the still-existing all-black township of Nicodemus, Kan., offers up a tantalizing story, rich in detail and possibility. San Diego Repertory Theatre realizes some of the potential in Cleage's 1992 play. Its triumphs are the creation of slaves turned pioneers--Miss Leah and Sophie Washington, magnificently played here by Irma P. Hall and Sylvia M'Lafi Thompson. But the play needs judicious cutting and rewriting.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1994 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Flyin' West," Pearl Cleage's post-Civil War tale of the founding of the still-existing all-black township of Nicodemus, Kan., offers up a tantalizing story, rich in detail and possibility. San Diego Repertory Theatre realizes some of the potential in Cleage's 1992 play. Its triumphs are the creation of slaves turned pioneers--Miss Leah and Sophie Washington, magnificently played here by Irma P. Hall and Sylvia M'Lafi Thompson. But the play needs judicious cutting and rewriting.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 1997 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Soul food cooking is cooking that comes from the heart," says Mother Joe, matriarch of an African American family. So does "Soul Food," a warm and embracing family drama, written and directed by George Tillman Jr. Tillman drew inspiration from his own Milwaukee family, his beloved grandmother in particular. Humor, sentiment and melodrama strike a balance as he brings to life nine major characters and a host of others as well. For 40 years, the now-widowed Mother Joe (the majestic Irma P.
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