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Irreplaceable

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1990
Thanks for the April 29 articles about incoming Phantom Robert Guillaume and the gracious observances of exiting Michael Crawford. I saw the superb Dave Willets starring in "The Phantom of the Opera" in London and was fortunate to also see Crawford in the role a week before his departure from Los Angeles. Entering the Ahmanson, however, I was disturbed by comments I overheard. There was a buzz concerning how irreplaceable Crawford was--and who could imagine a "black Phantom"?
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SCIENCE
October 9, 2013 | By Amy Hubbard
The U.S. Antarctic research program is another casualty of the government shutdown, and scientists are fuming.  The development would scrap an entire season of research for some scientists. It "makes the blood boil," says Ross Powell, lead scientist for the  WISSARD drilling expedition. He told Live Science that $5 million in research investment could go down the drain. PHOTOS: ISS crews and amazing images from space The National Science Foundation made the announcement Tuesday, recalling scientists and staff from Antarctica and placing the U.S. program in "caretaker status.
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SPORTS
November 16, 1991
The smile. The enthusiasm. The player. The man. A small part of all of us died last Thursday when we realized that even our heroes are mortal. Hang in there Magic. You are irreplaceable. BAXTER SCRUGGS Leucadia
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2010 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Early moments of the documentary "Smash His Camera" feature a 1981 clip in which paparazzo Ron Galella stalks Katharine Hepburn on her way to a rehearsal. When his attempt to photograph her through a hedge proves unsuccessful, he jumps in his car and races to the theater where he manages to capture her, albeit mostly shielded by an umbrella, as she ducks in a back door. Narrated by David Frost, the clip has the dramatic pacing of a "Wild Kingdom" episode in which Galella is cheetah to Hepburn's gazelle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1988
In viewing the State of the Union message, I reflected upon how utterly irreplaceable Reagan is to our great nation. I found myself bowing to the porcelain god while wretching in disgust at the hypocritical and blatantly deceptive Democratic response. How catatonic do Byrd and Wright feel our electorate to be? If they honestly believe that the President is responsible for the deficits resulting from their bloated and wasteful budgets, then perhaps they would do well to use our hard-earned tax dollars for their own psychiatric treatment.
NEWS
June 14, 2005
Regarding "An Outside Chance for Schoolkids" [June 7]: The study by the American Institutes for Research shows that the benefits to students in outdoor science classes are clear and compelling. School programs that include experiential learning, such as the Coast Alive! project, benefit children. Our coast and state parks benefit too when kids come to understand the value of our unique and irreplaceable resources. Sara Feldman Southern California director California State Parks Foundation
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2000
Re "Carmona Sues Over Robbery Conviction," (Dec. 12): Arthur Carmona basically was told, "OK, you didn't commit the crimes, but don't you ever get in trouble, and by the way, sign this release of our liability if you want to go home." These were absolutely reprehensible words and demands on the part of the Costa Mesa and Irvine police departments. If ever anyone was justified in bringing suit and deserves compensation for the loss of irreplaceable years in his young life, it is Carmona and his family.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1992
If 250 houses are all the Air Force needs, why don't they buy 250 of the condos and houses available in San Pedro now, while prices are down, and then, when and if the Air Force does leave eventually, sell them for profit? This would make good economic sense for the Air Force and for San Pedro. What could be more absurd than our Chamber of Commerce and other political and commercial powers burying our town's irreplaceable environmental assets under 250 ugly housing units, when we're in the middle of a real estate glut?
OPINION
May 6, 2003
"Share the Wealth in Iraq" (editorial, May 2) notes that all Alaskans receive direct annual payouts -- last year $1,540 per capita -- as their share of the state's oil wealth. Great idea for them and for the Iraqis: sharing the profits from the irreplaceable natural resources of their land as the oil is removed and sold. I understand that Norway has a similar program, with set-asides for all citizens from their North Sea oil and gas. Now how about the rest of us -- a program for all Americans to share oil, gas and coal revenues, as well as proceeds for all other mining on U.S. lands, rather than seeing the proceeds of our irreplaceable natural assets go to a wealthy few "owners" and all those transnational companies that feed off our national treasure while giving the people a tiny "trickle down" share?
OPINION
September 22, 1991
Re "U.S. Moves to Protect the Gnatcatcher," Part A, Sept 6: The discussion currently surrounding the proposed designation of the California gnatcatcher as an endangered species is somewhat akin to seriously examining the pros and cons of nuclear war. To even suggest that any species be channeled toward extinction to allow a few more tract houses, hotels or freeways in Southern California and a few more Mercedes in real estate developers' garages...
WORLD
May 17, 2009 | Henry Chu
There's only thin air where the memories of an entire city once dwelt. The diaries of a 16th century burgher who duly recorded the medications he was on as well as the state of his marriage. The monastic charters from 1,000 years ago, priceless illustrated manuscripts from the Middle Ages and old report cards from the last century. The minutes of city council meetings that, with German meticulousness, officials had collected every year since 1396.
SPORTS
March 18, 2008 | Mike DiGiovanna, Times Staff Writer
TEMPE, Ariz. -- Dustin Moseley probably will replace the injured John Lackey in the rotation to start the season, but even Moseley knows he can't replace the intangibles Lackey brings. "Every start he went out there last year, we had a feeling we were going to win," Moseley said. "You just have faith in him and in the consistency he showed all year, and in the work he puts in off the field. "With all that, you just expect success from the guy. He's been around, he's got the experience, he learns, he works his butt off, he goes out there and he gets fired up, man. It's a beautiful thing, knowing he's prepared himself and knowing he's going to do it."
OPINION
January 4, 2007 | Richard Dawkins, RICHARD DAWKINS, an evolutionary biologist, is a professor at Oxford University. He is the author of many books including, most recently, "The Ancestor's Tale" and "The God Delusion."
THE OBVIOUS objections to the execution of Saddam Hussein are valid and well aired. His death will provoke violent strife between Sunni and Shiite Muslims, and between Iraqis in general and the American occupation forces. This was an opportunity to set a good example of civilized behavior in dealing with a barbarically uncivilized man. In any case, revenge is an ignoble motive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 2006 | Hector Becerra, Times Staff Writer
Inside the shuttle bus that snaked around South Los Angeles and made a stop at Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center, the fate of the troubled hospital charged the small confines with emotion. The passengers had heard about the patient deaths, the failed inspections, the seemingly constant political turmoil. To them, though, the hospital may be imperfect, burdened with a great responsibility, deeply flawed -- but it is ultimately irreplaceable.
BOOKS
October 9, 2005 | Charles Solomon, Charles Solomon is the author of many books, including "Enchanted Drawings: The History of Animation," and is a frequent contributor to The Times and National Public Radio's program "Day to Day."
DURING the all-too-brief time it ran -- from Nov. 18, 1985, to Dec. 31, 1995 -- "Calvin and Hobbes" was simultaneously the most old-fashioned and the most innovative comic strip in newspapers. Its creator, Bill Watterson, returned to the principles of polished draftsmanship, visual imagination and character-driven humor that have been the source of comic strips' popularity since their inception in the 1890s.
NEWS
June 14, 2005
Regarding "An Outside Chance for Schoolkids" [June 7]: The study by the American Institutes for Research shows that the benefits to students in outdoor science classes are clear and compelling. School programs that include experiential learning, such as the Coast Alive! project, benefit children. Our coast and state parks benefit too when kids come to understand the value of our unique and irreplaceable resources. Sara Feldman Southern California director California State Parks Foundation
NEWS
March 19, 2002
Regarding "In the Wonderland of Libraries Are Cats Like Alis" (Feb. 18): The symbiotic relationship between cats and libraries goes back to medieval times at least. In the days when manuscripts were hand-copied on parchment, mice could decimate a library's irreplaceable collection and cats were therefore a necessity. MAGGIE PARKHURST Glendale Cats and books go together for the St. Ambrose Book Group as well. My Siamese, Lucy Monkeygirl, eagerly awaits the second Monday of each month at my house.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1995
So, Jose Aponte [librarian of the San Juan Capistrano Regional Library] is leaving our community for a community he describes as "more conducive" to the arts ("Closing the Book on O.C. Career," May 13). And County Librarian John Adams says: "We certainly hope to have [Aponte's replacement] in place . . . ." Nobody is going to replace Jose. He is one of a kind, and as a member of this artistic community, I will miss him. For several years, I produced reader's theater with Jose. Thousands of readers came in and read with Ray Bradbury, Jack Smith and other authors.
OPINION
June 5, 2005
I'm concerned that Joel Stein's column may be put under the ax (Opinion, May 29), and I wanted to send this in the hope that I could sway at least a few people to keep him. Although it may be too solipsistic and narcissistic for some readers, they fail to understand that this is Stein's point. He is speaking to the younger generation by using our understanding of the world. This is what we grew up with, and he uses it and a cutting sense of humor and satire to make his points. Some claim that his points need not be made.
NEWS
February 24, 2005 | Richard Cromelin, Times Staff Writer
Indie rock is certainly on a roll. With such products of the scene as Bright Eyes and Arcade Fire getting huge media exposure and even selling some records, this alternative to the major-label system has become an increasingly viable, thriving place for bands to develop and prosper. Given that flowering, it was easy to imagine a delegation of prominent indie musicians assembling at the Henry Fonda Theatre on Tuesday to bow down in gratitude before the evening's headliner, Paul Westerberg.
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