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Irvine Ranch Water District

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2000 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pelican Hill Golf Course in Newport Beach was fined $148,000 Friday for illegally discharging recycled water into the ocean off Crystal Cove, state water officials said. "Environmentally, it probably didn't have that much effect, but it's very serious due to the magnitude of the discharges, the fact they weren't reported and they were repeated," said Kurt Berchtold, assistant executive officer of the Santa Ana Regional Water Quality Control Board.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2000 | MATTHEW EBNET, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two of four men charged with stealing more than $2.2 million from the Irvine Ranch Water District by submitting improper bills for rebates on water conservation equipment pleaded guilty Wednesday and agreed to pay restitution. Wayne Melvin Smith of Tustin, a district employee who ran the water conservation program, admitted to orchestrating the elaborate, two-year scheme. Under the plea agreement, he will spend five years in prison and reimburse the district $2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1999 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The problem-plagued San Joaquin Reservoir--infamous for past infestations of midge fly larvae and African clawed frogs--could be resurrected as an open-air storage basin for reclaimed water under an agreement being worked out by regional water districts. The plan, approved Tuesday by the Metropolitan Water District's board of directors, calls for the Irvine Ranch Water District to repair the empty reservoir atop Newport Beach's Spyglass Hill to feed its public irrigation system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1999 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to end a long-running battle over plans to release highly treated waste water into Upper Newport Bay, the Irvine Ranch Water District has come up with a plan it says would put dramatically less water into the bay. But a lawyer for the environmental group that has been fighting the district's plans said a judge's order bars any waste water at all. "The bottom line is, we don't think reclaimed water belongs in the bay," said Mark Wolfe, the attorney for Defend the Bay. "The judge agreed."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1999
Seeking to end a long-running battle over plans to dump highly treated waste water into Upper Newport Bay, the Irvine Ranch Water District has come up with a plan it says will send dramatically less water into the bay. But a lawyer for the environmental group that has been fighting the district's plans said that dumping any reclaimed water into the bay violates a judge's order. "The bottom line is, we don't think reclaimed water belongs in the bay," said Mark Wolfe, attorney for Defend the Bay.
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