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Irvine Unified School District Finances

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1999 | Mathis Winkler (949) 764-4311
Members of the Irvine Unified School District's finance committee got a sneak peek at a $140-million budget Monday, along with dismal predictions for the future. "There is no way that the school district can continue to provide what it does," said Deputy Superintendent Paul Reed, who added that there is not enough money to support the district's arts, science and music programs in the long run. "We would need an additional $6 million to begin to get competitive [with other school districts.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2000 | Deniene Husted, (714) 520-2508
The Irvine Public Schools Foundation, which recently raised $2.2 million to help keep music, arts, science and other programs from being cut this year, will host a reception tonight to honor those who took part in the fund-raising. More than 2,300 donors and 18 major corporations pitched in to help fill a shortfall from the state, which would have resulted in $4 million in budget cuts for 2000-2001, according to Greg Bradbard, the foundation's executive director.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2000 | Mathis Winkler, (949) 764-4311
As trustees of the Irvine Unified School District ponder at least $4 million in budget cuts, the district's finance committee is sifting through more than 200 money-saving suggestions from residents. Comments, unofficially solicited by the district, ranged from the absurd, such as one suggestion that the district sell its Gulfstream jet (administrators said that the district does not own a plane of any kind) to eliminating lunches in San Francisco.
NEWS
April 13, 2000 | KATE FOLMAR and LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Stung by defeat in a key election for one of Orange County's best school districts, Irvine tax boosters Wednesday searched their community's soul for answers to why the $3-million-a-year measure failed. Why, the tax supporters asked, can other districts, less affluent districts, muster enough votes to pass school bonds while the high-scoring Irvine school system couldn't scrape together the necessary two-thirds support for a $95-per-parcel tax?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1994 | RUSS LOAR
At least one school board member has not given up on building a $1.2 million stadium at the planned Northwood High School, even though Irvine Unified School District budget managers say the district can't afford it. When the new $51-million high school opens in the fall of 1997, it will have athletic fields, a gymnasium, athletic courts and locker rooms. But plans to construct a 5,000-seat stadium, 50-meter pool, an additional gymnasium and three tennis courts are on hold because of their $3.
NEWS
April 13, 2000 | KATE FOLMAR and LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Stung by defeat in a key election for one of Orange County's best school districts, Irvine tax boosters Wednesday searched their community's soul for answers to why the $3-million-a-year measure failed. Why, the tax supporters asked, can other districts, less affluent districts, muster enough votes to pass school bonds while the high-scoring Irvine school system couldn't scrape together the necessary two-thirds support for a $95-per-parcel tax?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2000 | MATHIS WINKLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Layoff notices went out Friday to 231 teachers in the Irvine Unified School District, officials said. Though school staffs knew that the notices were coming because of a $4-million budget deficit, the principals who delivered the news to the affected teachers said they were shocked by the number of cuts. "It became a reality today," said Diana Schmelzer, principal at University High School, which alerted 17 faculty members of their possible layoffs.
NEWS
April 12, 2000 | KATE FOLMAR and MATHIS WINKLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Teachers broke into tears Tuesday night as a tax to rescue the strapped Irvine schools failed, forcing the shutdown of arts, music and science enrichment programs and the swelling of class sizes in a premiere school district that has been the pride of the city. The measure drew 63.9% of the vote, nearly 3 percentage points short of the two-thirds needed for passage. More than 42% of the Irvine electorate cast ballots on the measure, a heavy turnout especially for a special election.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1995 | CHING-CHING NI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The financial woes that have beset the Irvine Unified School District since the Orange County investment pool collapsed are having one unexpected benefit: unifying several groups of Asian parents, who have contributed as much as $56,000 to the district. One of the groups plans to add $20,000 more today from a fund-raising soprano recital. "This fund-raiser demonstrates that we are involved, we are active and we can be mobilized," said Louis Chang, president of South Coast Chinese Cultural Assn.
NEWS
April 12, 2000 | KATE FOLMAR and MATHIS WINKLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Teachers broke into tears Tuesday night as a tax to rescue the strapped Irvine schools failed, forcing the shutdown of arts, music and science enrichment programs and the swelling of class sizes in a premiere school district that has been the pride of the city. The measure drew 63.9% of the vote, nearly 3 percentage points short of the two-thirds needed for passage. More than 42% of the Irvine electorate cast ballots on the measure, a heavy turnout especially for a special election.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2000 | MATHIS WINKLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Layoff notices went out Friday to 231 teachers in the Irvine Unified School District, officials said. Though school staffs knew that the notices were coming because of a $4-million budget deficit, the principals who delivered the news to the affected teachers said they were shocked by the number of cuts. "It became a reality today," said Diana Schmelzer, principal at University High School, which alerted 17 faculty members of their possible layoffs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2000 | MATHIS WINKLER and LISA RICHARDSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Faced with the possibility of layoffs and the demise of highly regarded art, music and science programs, about 300 teachers in the Irvine Unified School District dressed in black for a twilight demonstration Tuesday against pending cuts. "Our professionalism is on the line here," Gail Rothman, president of the Irvine Teachers Assn., told the gathering. "Do we accept everything the district offers us? No."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1999 | Mathis Winkler (949) 764-4311
Members of the Irvine Unified School District's finance committee got a sneak peek at a $140-million budget Monday, along with dismal predictions for the future. "There is no way that the school district can continue to provide what it does," said Deputy Superintendent Paul Reed, who added that there is not enough money to support the district's arts, science and music programs in the long run. "We would need an additional $6 million to begin to get competitive [with other school districts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1995 | CHING-CHING NI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The financial woes that have beset the Irvine Unified School District since the Orange County investment pool collapsed are having one unexpected benefit: unifying several groups of Asian parents, who have contributed as much as $56,000 to the district. One of the groups plans to add $20,000 more today from a fund-raising soprano recital. "This fund-raiser demonstrates that we are involved, we are active and we can be mobilized," said Louis Chang, president of South Coast Chinese Cultural Assn.
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