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Irvine Unified School District

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2002 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trustees may put off choosing a new superintendent for the Irvine Unified School District until they can resolve stalled contract negotiations with teachers, the board's president said Wednesday. "It may not be very wise to bring somebody into the middle of this," Steven S. Choi said the day after the superintendent announced her retirement. The top administrator's departure, he said, "may open up some new channels for dialogue.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2002 | TINA BORGATTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
School officials in Irvine will learn today whether a three-month campaign can round up enough money to preserve small class sizes in all four of the earliest primary grades. To help balance a $5.2-million budget deficit, the Irvine Unified School District's Board of Education in January announced plans to pull out of the state-sponsored program, which limits class sizes to 20 students in kindergarten through third grade.
NEWS
February 3, 2002
Re "Deep Budget Cuts Finally Hit Irvine Schools Hard," Jan. 27. I just wish to set the record straight about class sizes in Irvine Unified School District. Your paper has been saying that Irvine will have to do away with class-size reduction in grades kindergarten, second, and third. Kindergarten has never had 20 on the roll. This is my 30th year teaching kindergarten in this district and I have never had only 20 in my class. I now have 33 boys and girls that I am teaching to read, to write in sentences, to learn the addition and subtraction facts, as well as those developmental skills 4- and 5-year-olds are supposed to be working on. I have 33 report cards to complete, 33 parent conferences, and 33 little people that I am responsible for each day. It is time that our neighborhoods get the correct information about our class sizes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2002 | JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Irvine school board members debated late Tuesday whether to increase class sizes in primary grades and make the high-scoring district among the first in the state to walk away from a popular class-size reform program. Board members said before the night was out they would make that painful choice or others to address a $5.2-million budget shortfall. Trustees were also considering trimming more than 20 programs, from school nurses to music and science classes.
NEWS
August 16, 2001
Composite scores for the Stanford 9 show that the Irvine Unified School District once again had the best overall scores in Orange County. The composite scores represent the percentage of students in all grade levels who scored at or above the national average on the test. The following table shows the composite scores for Orange County's districts. -- DISTRICT '01 00-01 % gain Irvine Unified 80.3 2.1 Fountain Valley Elementary 78.9 3.1 Laguna Beach Unified 78.1 0.0 Cypress Elementary 77.5 1.4 Los Alamitos Unified 76.4 2.8 Saddleback Valley Unified 75.5 1.5 H.B. City Elementary 72.0 1.0 Capistrano Unified 71.7 3.0 Brea-Olinda Unified 71.3 3.0 Ocean View Elementary 68.3 3.8 Placentia-Yorba Linda Unified 64.6 1.4 Centralia Elementary 61.6 3.4 Newport-Mesa Unified 60.3 1.9 Savanna Elementary 59.5 5.2 H.B. Union High 59.3 0.7 Tustin Unified 58.2 0.5 Fullerton Elementary 58.1 2.1 Orange Unified 57.5 1.1 Westminster Elementary 54.9 3.4 Fullerton Joint Union High 53.8 0.7 Buena Park Elementary 50.9 2.6 Garden Grove Unified 50.5 4.3 La Habra City Elementary 48.8 3.1 Magnolia Elementary 43.8 2.6 Anaheim Union High 42.7 1.5 Anaheim Elementary 37.4 2.8 Santa Ana Unified 29.4 2.3 O.C. Office of Education 13.4 2.7 -- Source: California Department of Education
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
Science courses for kindergartners will be eliminated and their art and music classes will be reduced under a budget proposal adopted Tuesday by the Irvine Unified School District. The proposal was developed by a task force of educators, community members, the Irvine Music Coalition and the Irvine Public School Foundation. School board member Karen Preston said the program, which offers 25 to 35 minutes of weekly instruction, is supposed to be covered by donations from the school foundation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2001 | MATTHEW EBNET
As part of a broad plan to give $25 million over several years to improve schools serving Irvine Ranch communities, Irvine Co. and the Donald Bren Foundation on Wednesday announced the first distribution of funds. For the 2001-02 school year, about $2.8 million will go to 52 schools as cash awards of $15,000 each to teachers and principals for outstanding work, and to two other education programs. Rich Elbaum, a spokesman for Irvine Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2001 | ELAINE GALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Already considered a trendsetter in Orange County, the Irvine Unified School District has been sponsoring brainstorming sessions among more than 50 students, teachers and administrators to map out a vision for the district's future. Called the Future Force Committee, the group is trying to dissect and plan for crucial issues cropping up in the district, including fiscal stability, attendance boundaries, technology training, school security, teacher training and parent involvement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2001 | MONTE MORIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Irvine Unified School District trustees voted 4 to 1 Tuesday night to oppose the placement of a proposed $2-billion light rail line in their city, saying that the line would run adjacent to two high schools and come too close to an elementary school. Among other complaints, Irvine Trustee Carolyn McInerney said that Orange County Transportation Authority planners failed to consult with the school district before proposing the route.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2001 | Deniene Husted, (714) 966-5908
School custodians, nurses, cafeteria workers and other non-teaching employees of the Irvine Unified School District received a 10% raise this year, and those working 30 hours a week or more will be entitled to health and welfare benefits under a contract ratified this week by the school board. Teachers and administrators received similar raises before the holidays as more cash was made available for salaries and benefits, board member Margie Wakeham said.
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