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Isaac Stern

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May 2, 2003 | From Reuters
Aficionados have the chance to own some of Isaac Stern's violins and memorabilia nearly two years after his death. On Thursday, 4-year-old Internet auction house Tarisio Auctions began selling 180 items belonging to Stern, the violinist who nurtured musicians such as Yo-Yo Ma and Itzhak Perlman and who saved New York City's Carnegie Hall from the wrecker's ball. The items from the Stern estate range from violins, violin bows and photographs to his humidor and Steinway & Sons piano.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2005 | From Associated Press
A Connecticut probate judge has ordered the former executor of violinist Isaac Stern's estate to pay hundreds of thousands of dollars to Stern's three grown children. Stern's children, from his second marriage, had gone to probate court asking former executor William Moorhead III for more than $2 million, claiming he improperly calculated the estate's value and transferred assets to Stern's third wife, Linda Reynolds Stern.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2003 | Daniel Cariaga
About 200 items from the personal collection of the late Isaac Stern will be put up for auction May 1-8 by Tarisio Auctions, the New York-based Internet auctioneer of fine and rare violins, violas, cellos and bows. Among the items: a circa-1850 violin by J.B.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2004 | From Associated Press
After the violinist Isaac Stern died, pieces of his legacy, including autographed photographs, a music collection and violins and bows, were auctioned off. But Stern's three children say that never should have happened and are suing the former executor of their father's estate for more than $2 million. They say he improperly calculated the estate's value and left it unable to pay off the musician's debts, while paying himself thousands of dollars in personal expenses.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2003 | From Associated Press
It's a new Manhattan address: Isaac Stern Place. Stern, who helped save Carnegie Hall, was honored Friday in a ceremony naming the corner of West 57th Street and 7th Avenue in his memory. Stern saved the musical landmark from the wrecking ball in 1960 and was Carnegie Hall's president for more than 40 years, until his death in September 2001 at age 81. From Associated Press
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 1996 | TIMOTHY MANGAN
The clouds parted at Dorothy Chandler Pavilion Sunday night and out came Isaac Stern, grandpappy of the violin. He's 75 now, in a musical culture that seems content with teenage violinists, that ranks mechanical perfection as the highest musical good, that prefers its fiddlers with a bit of flash and circus-act pyrotechnics over substance. Stern's not interested. He keeps going on, his ever-probing intellect, his concern with only the best music and the best in music fully engaged.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2004 | From Associated Press
After the violinist Isaac Stern died, pieces of his legacy, including autographed photographs, a music collection and violins and bows, were auctioned off. But Stern's three children say that never should have happened and are suing the former executor of their father's estate for more than $2 million. They say he improperly calculated the estate's value and left it unable to pay off the musician's debts, while paying himself thousands of dollars in personal expenses.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2005 | From Associated Press
A Connecticut probate judge has ordered the former executor of violinist Isaac Stern's estate to pay hundreds of thousands of dollars to Stern's three grown children. Stern's children, from his second marriage, had gone to probate court asking former executor William Moorhead III for more than $2 million, claiming he improperly calculated the estate's value and transferred assets to Stern's third wife, Linda Reynolds Stern.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1990 | JOHN HENKEN
It was time for the Los Angeles Philharmonic pension fund concert, Monday at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, and the call of "Round up the usual suspects!" must have gone out. The names may change, but the faces--and the music--are always familiar at these annual benefits. For this edition the guests were conductor Leonard Slatkin and violinist Isaac Stern, and their subject matter was three middle-period Beethoven classics.
NEWS
September 23, 2001 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Isaac Stern, a Russian Jewish immigrant who rose to become one of the most influential American violinists of his generation, died Saturday in New York. Stern's elegant, unfaltering musicality was matched by his generosity as a teacher and an activist. He worked to save Carnegie Hall from the wreckers' ball and became music's spokesman around the world--making groundbreaking trips to China after the Cultural Revolution and to the Soviet Union.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2003 | From Associated Press
It's a new Manhattan address: Isaac Stern Place. Stern, who helped save Carnegie Hall, was honored Friday in a ceremony naming the corner of West 57th Street and 7th Avenue in his memory. Stern saved the musical landmark from the wrecking ball in 1960 and was Carnegie Hall's president for more than 40 years, until his death in September 2001 at age 81. From Associated Press
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2003 | From Reuters
Aficionados have the chance to own some of Isaac Stern's violins and memorabilia nearly two years after his death. On Thursday, 4-year-old Internet auction house Tarisio Auctions began selling 180 items belonging to Stern, the violinist who nurtured musicians such as Yo-Yo Ma and Itzhak Perlman and who saved New York City's Carnegie Hall from the wrecker's ball. The items from the Stern estate range from violins, violin bows and photographs to his humidor and Steinway & Sons piano.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2003 | Daniel Cariaga
About 200 items from the personal collection of the late Isaac Stern will be put up for auction May 1-8 by Tarisio Auctions, the New York-based Internet auctioneer of fine and rare violins, violas, cellos and bows. Among the items: a circa-1850 violin by J.B.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2001
"Evolution" (8 p.m. KCET, KVCR) moves beyond the body to examine the human mind, and then takes on the debate between science and religion, as the series concludes. "American Masters" (9 p.m. KCET) will rebroadcast "Isaac Stern: Life's Virtuoso" featuring rarely seen archival footage of the late violinist performing at the height of his artistry. MOVIES Teenage witches Fairuza Balk and Robin Tunney stir up supernatural trouble in "The Craft" (8 p.m. KTLA).
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2001 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Isaac Stern was a magnificent violinist. He was a lot more as well--an international cultural ambassador, one of the best classical music scouts ever, a man committed to speaking out about human rights and education. His name was synonymous with New York's preeminent musical icon, Carnegie Hall. He mounted a campaign to save it when was about to be torn down in 1960; he then became its president and oversaw its rise to new glory.
NEWS
September 23, 2001 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Isaac Stern, a Russian Jewish immigrant who rose to become one of the most influential American violinists of his generation, died Saturday in New York. Stern's elegant, unfaltering musicality was matched by his generosity as a teacher and an activist. He worked to save Carnegie Hall from the wreckers' ball and became music's spokesman around the world--making groundbreaking trips to China after the Cultural Revolution and to the Soviet Union.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1995 | Herbert Glass, Herbert Glass is a regular contributor to Calendar
Sony Classics is giving Isaac Stern the Immortal Legend treatment: 44 CDs--all individual, mid-priced discs--of recordings from the '60s and '70s, the kind of thing usually accorded venerated artists either retired or in their graves. Stern is, at 75, still before the public, although anyone coming for the first time to his playing in concert or even in recent recordings couldn't be blamed for wondering what the shouting is about.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1988 | JOHN HENKEN
At nearly 68, Isaac Stern is beginning to resemble a short Andres Segovia. He has the girth, the processional entrances, the white hair and pink face, and the swift, impaling stare for loud coughers. His playing, however, still compares favorably with the youngest and whizziest of the current crop, at least when his attention is fully engaged. Tuesday evening at Royce Hall, it was Bartok's Sonata No. 1 that awoke the violinist.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2001 | MARTIN STEINBERG, ASSOCIATED PRESS
If words don't work, try a sponge. Master teachers carry many tools in their bags. The sage of string playing, Isaac Stern, pulled out a sponge from his to treat this patient's condition: Eighteen-year-old Filip Fegus was using his left hand too much to support his fiddle rather than keeping his fingers relaxed and free to chase after the notes. "You're not holding the violin right," the 80-year-old maestro told the young man with dark, spiked hair. "You are holding and playing.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2000 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Isaac Stern's 80th birthday has not been easy on either the famed violinist or the Los Angeles Philharmonic. Around a month after Stern's July birthday--which was the theme of the Philharmonic's opening night gala Thursday--he underwent heart surgery. Irrepressible as ever, he planned to travel to Los Angeles anyway. But his doctors ordered otherwise. The Philharmonic was left with a last-minute scramble for replacements.
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