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Ishinomaki

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WORLD
March 22, 2011 | By Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
In what may be the first confirmed American casualty from the devastating earthquake and tsunami in Japan, a Virginia couple said the body of their 24-year-old daughter has been found amid the rubble. The family of Taylor Anderson, who was teaching English in Japan, released a statement saying they had been notified by officials from the U.S. Embassy in Japan that their daughter was found in the city of Ishinomaki in northeast Japan, the Associated Press reported. Officials at the embassy were not immediately able to confirm Anderson's death Tuesday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2012 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
"You are about to see something strange and very memorable," architect Yoshihiro Horii told me as we were driving near the waterfront in Ishinomaki, a city of 160,000 people in northeastern Japan that was heavily damaged by the earthquake and tsunami last March 11. As his wife, a fellow architect named Shoko Fukuya, steered the car over the crest of a hill, we caught a glimpse of what he was talking about: a giant red metal cylinder, 35 feet high...
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WORLD
March 20, 2011 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
An 80-year-old woman and her 16-year-old grandson were rescued Sunday after being buried under rubble for nine days after the worst recorded earthquake in Japanese history and a massive tsunami toppled their home. The two were trapped in their kitchen after the magnitude 9 temblor struck March 11 and survived by wrapping themselves in towels and eating yogurt and drinking, water, milk and Coke, Japanese news reports said. Sumi Abe had been unable to free herself after her legs were wedged under the refrigerator.
WORLD
May 24, 2011 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
Moments after the massive earthquake struck this northeastern Japan town, editor Hiroyuki Takeuchi gazed about his tiny newsroom and took stock: His computers were worthless; his printing press on the floor below would soon be flooded by the tsunami. Still, the next day Takeuchi and his staff of six reporters made sure the Ishinomaki Hibi Shimbun hit the streets just as it had for the last 100 years. For six days, working by flashlight, wearing overcoats in the chilly office, they put the paper out by hand, with black felt-tip markers and large sheets of white paper.
WORLD
March 17, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
Most of the dozens of tsunami-battered towns along Japan's northeastern coast remain mired in mud, but the situation in Ishinomaki is a bit different. Nearly a week after the massive earthquake and tsunami hit the city of 162,000, large portions remain underwater, an instant lake clearly visible on NASA satellite photographs. Amid the aqueous landscape looms Hideaki Akaiwa, 43, in full battle gear. In a nation of careful dressers, Akaiwa sports Rambo-style army pants, a blue sweatshirt, muddy sneakers, legs wrapped in plastic secured with orange duct tape, and three different backpacks, including an L.L. Bean fanny pack with a tiny plastic anime character affixed, a doctor that saves people.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2012 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
"You are about to see something strange and very memorable," architect Yoshihiro Horii told me as we were driving near the waterfront in Ishinomaki, a city of 160,000 people in northeastern Japan that was heavily damaged by the earthquake and tsunami last March 11. As his wife, a fellow architect named Shoko Fukuya, steered the car over the crest of a hill, we caught a glimpse of what he was talking about: a giant red metal cylinder, 35 feet high...
WORLD
March 20, 2011 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
An 80-year-old woman and her 16-year-old grandson were rescued Sunday after being buried under rubble for nine days after the worst earthquake in Japanese history and a massive tsunami toppled their home. The two were trapped in their kitchen after the magnitude 9.0 temblor struck March 11 and survived by wrapping themselves in towels and eating yogurt and drinking, water, milk and Coke, Japanese news reports said. Teenager Jin Abe eventually dug his way out of the debris onto the roof of the home, where he was able to alert rescuers.
WORLD
March 20, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Don Lee and Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Workers at a crippled Japanese nuclear plant said they succeeded in connecting two reactors to the power grid Sunday, raising the possibility it could restore vital cooling systems to the overheated facilities. The glimmer of progress came on a day police miraculously rescued an elderly woman and her teenage grandson trapped under rubble for nine days after a devastating earthquake and tsunami leveled their home. But fears are emerging about radiation contamination in Japan's food supplies.
WORLD
March 20, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Don Lee and Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
On a day police miraculously rescued an elderly woman and her teenage grandson trapped for nine days under rubble, workers at a crippled Japanese nuclear plant said they succeeded in connecting two reactors to the power grid Sunday, raising the possibility it could restore vital cooling systems to the overheated facilities. But those glimmers of progress continued to compete against emerging fears about radiation contamination in Japan's food supplies. A day after officials said they discovered higher-than-normal radioactivity in batches of milk and spinach -- as well as traces of radioactive iodine in tap water in Tokyo and elsewhere -- the Associated Press reported Sunday that Japanese fava beans imported to Taiwan were found to have small amounts of radiation, according to an official of Taiwan's Atomic Energy Council.
WORLD
March 22, 2011 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
Tatsuhiro Karino paused at the top of the muddy hill, took his wife, Masako, by the hand and led her slowly down to the ruins of the elementary school that entombed the body of their daughter, Misaki. Dwarfed by four mammoth cranes digging into the wreckage, the 40ish construction worker gently pulled a veil over his wife's face to shield her from the dust and whiff of death. But he couldn't protect her from this: the grim task of locating the body of their 8-year-old child, among the 94 students and teachers killed when their school was leveled March 11 in nature's twin strike of shaking ground and torrential wave.
WORLD
March 22, 2011 | By Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
In what may be the first confirmed American casualty from the devastating earthquake and tsunami in Japan, a Virginia couple said the body of their 24-year-old daughter has been found amid the rubble. The family of Taylor Anderson, who was teaching English in Japan, released a statement saying they had been notified by officials from the U.S. Embassy in Japan that their daughter was found in the city of Ishinomaki in northeast Japan, the Associated Press reported. Officials at the embassy were not immediately able to confirm Anderson's death Tuesday.
WORLD
March 22, 2011 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
Tatsuhiro Karino paused at the top of the muddy hill, took his wife, Masako, by the hand and led her slowly down to the ruins of the elementary school that entombed the body of their daughter, Misaki. Dwarfed by four mammoth cranes digging into the wreckage, the 40ish construction worker gently pulled a veil over his wife's face to shield her from the dust and whiff of death. But he couldn't protect her from this: the grim task of locating the body of their 8-year-old child, among the 94 students and teachers killed when their school was leveled March 11 in nature's twin strike of shaking ground and torrential wave.
WORLD
March 20, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Don Lee and Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Workers at a crippled Japanese nuclear plant said they succeeded in connecting two reactors to the power grid Sunday, raising the possibility it could restore vital cooling systems to the overheated facilities. The glimmer of progress came on a day police miraculously rescued an elderly woman and her teenage grandson trapped under rubble for nine days after a devastating earthquake and tsunami leveled their home. But fears are emerging about radiation contamination in Japan's food supplies.
WORLD
March 20, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Don Lee and Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
On a day police miraculously rescued an elderly woman and her teenage grandson trapped for nine days under rubble, workers at a crippled Japanese nuclear plant said they succeeded in connecting two reactors to the power grid Sunday, raising the possibility it could restore vital cooling systems to the overheated facilities. But those glimmers of progress continued to compete against emerging fears about radiation contamination in Japan's food supplies. A day after officials said they discovered higher-than-normal radioactivity in batches of milk and spinach -- as well as traces of radioactive iodine in tap water in Tokyo and elsewhere -- the Associated Press reported Sunday that Japanese fava beans imported to Taiwan were found to have small amounts of radiation, according to an official of Taiwan's Atomic Energy Council.
WORLD
March 20, 2011 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
An 80-year-old woman and her 16-year-old grandson were rescued Sunday after being buried under rubble for nine days after the worst earthquake in Japanese history and a massive tsunami toppled their home. The two were trapped in their kitchen after the magnitude 9.0 temblor struck March 11 and survived by wrapping themselves in towels and eating yogurt and drinking, water, milk and Coke, Japanese news reports said. Teenager Jin Abe eventually dug his way out of the debris onto the roof of the home, where he was able to alert rescuers.
WORLD
March 20, 2011 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
An 80-year-old woman and her 16-year-old grandson were rescued Sunday after being buried under rubble for nine days after the worst recorded earthquake in Japanese history and a massive tsunami toppled their home. The two were trapped in their kitchen after the magnitude 9 temblor struck March 11 and survived by wrapping themselves in towels and eating yogurt and drinking, water, milk and Coke, Japanese news reports said. Sumi Abe had been unable to free herself after her legs were wedged under the refrigerator.
WORLD
May 24, 2011 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
Moments after the massive earthquake struck this northeastern Japan town, editor Hiroyuki Takeuchi gazed about his tiny newsroom and took stock: His computers were worthless; his printing press on the floor below would soon be flooded by the tsunami. Still, the next day Takeuchi and his staff of six reporters made sure the Ishinomaki Hibi Shimbun hit the streets just as it had for the last 100 years. For six days, working by flashlight, wearing overcoats in the chilly office, they put the paper out by hand, with black felt-tip markers and large sheets of white paper.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2011 | Don Lee and David Pierson
As the manager of a sleek restaurant in Tokyo's Ginza shopping district, Yu Yoshida never expected he'd be in the kitchen wearing a white chef's hat and wrapping little dumplings. But that's exactly what he was doing this week as customers in this still disaster-shocked city start to drift back, a welcome but also worrisome prospect for the 33-year-old manager. That's because 15 of his workers, all Chinese nationals, bolted within a few days of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami, leaving Yoshida with a crew of just seven to wait tables, bus dishes and cook.
WORLD
March 17, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
Most of the dozens of tsunami-battered towns along Japan's northeastern coast remain mired in mud, but the situation in Ishinomaki is a bit different. Nearly a week after the massive earthquake and tsunami hit the city of 162,000, large portions remain underwater, an instant lake clearly visible on NASA satellite photographs. Amid the aqueous landscape looms Hideaki Akaiwa, 43, in full battle gear. In a nation of careful dressers, Akaiwa sports Rambo-style army pants, a blue sweatshirt, muddy sneakers, legs wrapped in plastic secured with orange duct tape, and three different backpacks, including an L.L. Bean fanny pack with a tiny plastic anime character affixed, a doctor that saves people.
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