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WORLD
January 24, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Pakistan told four officials at India's embassy to leave Islamabad within 48 hours, in retaliation for New Delhi kicking out four officials at Pakistan's embassy in India a day earlier. The four Pakistanis had been accused of "activities incompatible with their official status," an apparent reference to espionage. The tit-for-tat expulsions were expected to aggravate tensions between the nuclear rivals, who ended a 10-month standoff in October when they pulled back troops from their border.
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WORLD
April 9, 2014 | By Aoun Sahi, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan -- At least 19 people were killed and about 50 injured when a high-intensity explosion ripped through Islamabad's crowded fruit and vegetable market Wednesday, police said. A witness said the explosion happened at about 8:10 a.m. during the peak business hour. [Updated, 7 a.m. PDT April 9: Later in the day, the death toll was raised to at least 23, according to Islamabad Police Chief Khalid Khattak. He said more than 100 people were wounded in the blast.
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OPINION
June 19, 2012 | By Andrew J. Bacevich
The history of U.S.-Pakistani relations is one of wild swings between feigned friendship and ill-disguised mistrust. When the United States needs Pakistan, Washington showers Islamabad with money, weapons and expressions of high esteem. Once the need wanes, the gratuities cease, often with brutal abruptness. Instead of largesse, Pakistan gets lectures, with the instruction seldom well received. The events of 9/11inaugurated the relationship's most recent period of contrived warmth.
WORLD
October 31, 2013 | By Aoun Sahi and Mark Magnier
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan -- A claim by the Pakistani government this week that 67 civilians died in drone strikes over the last five years, a surprisingly low number given previous casualty estimates, has sparked controversy, skepticism and speculation that American pressure may be behind the figure. Adding to the debate, a drone strike early Thursday in North Waziristan near the border with Afghanistan -- the first in a month -- killed three people. Their identity was not immediately known.
OPINION
October 1, 2011
The fallout from last week's explosive Senate testimony by Adm. Michael G. Mullen, outgoing chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, in which he called the militant Haqqani network "a veritable arm" of Pakistan's Inter-Services Intelligence agency is still causing damage at home and in Pakistan. Both countries will suffer if it leads to a breakdown in relations. In the U.S., Mullen's testimony added momentum to a Senate bill that would cut off $1 billion in military aid to Pakistan unless it ends its support for Haqqani and other militant groups.
WORLD
July 28, 2010 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
A Pakistani passenger jet with 152 people aboard crashed Wednesday in a forested ridge outside Pakistan's capital, Islamabad. It was not known whether there were any survivors. The Airblue airliner, on its way from Karachi to the capital, had been flying through heavy fog and rain when it lost contact with air traffic control and crashed about 10 a.m. local time in the Margalla Hills region, authorities said. Rescuers were trying to reach the scene amid heavy rain and difficult roads.
WORLD
January 11, 2013 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - The "Arab Spring" seems a long way from Pakistan's winter of discontent. Still, when religious scholar Tahirul Qadri talks about his hopes for the massive rally he is planning in Islamabad on Monday, one that he hopes will lure more than a million people into the streets of the quiet capital, the image he uses is that of Cairo's Tahrir Square. Government leaders have tried to warn the gray-bearded mullah, respected by many for his denunciations of the Taliban and his espousal of tolerance, that a gathering on the scale he is planning would give militants the opportunity to carry out a major terrorist act. Pakistanis haven't forgotten that it was at a large rally in Islamabad's twin city, Rawalpindi, that former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto was assassinated by a suicide bomber in 2007.
WORLD
December 2, 2010 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
Months before the Obama administration this year urged Congress to provide $2 billion in military aid to Pakistan as part of an ongoing strategy to win over a reluctant ally in the war on terror, Washington's top diplomat in Islamabad had flatly warned that a cash-for-cooperation approach would never work. Ramped-up financial aid would not be enough incentive for Pakistan to sever ties with militant groups that attack U.S. and NATO troops in Afghanistan, then-Ambassador Anne Patterson said last year in recently disclosed diplomatic cables, because Islamabad views those groups as a hedge against the prospect of a pro-Indian government in Kabul.
OPINION
November 8, 2010 | By Selig S. Harrison
" Obama Mission: Billions to Pakistan, Billions From India" ? This screaming headline in the Times of India ahead of President Obama's visit to New Delhi explains why a quiet crisis is developing in what seems, on the surface, to be an increasingly promising relationship between the world's two largest democracies. Calling for a strategic partnership, Washington has pressed New Delhi to buy $11 billion in U.S. fighter aircraft and to sign defense agreements permitting U.S. military aircraft to refuel at Indian airfields and for U.S. naval vessels to dock in Indian ports.
WORLD
July 27, 2009 | Julian E. Barnes
Intelligence sharing and military cooperation have begun to increase between Pakistan and the United States, according to American officials, who say their efforts to cultivate key leaders in Islamabad may be beginning to pay dividends. Pakistan, they say, has stepped up its cooperation along its border with Afghanistan for the first time in recent years, informing Afghanistan and the U.S. about operations it is conducting and seeking a coordinated response to trap Islamist militants.
WORLD
September 25, 2013 | By Mark Magnier, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan -- In the wake of a massive earthquake in southwestern Pakistan, the death toll Wednesday rose sharply to nearly 300, officials and local media said. Crisis teams braced for more fatalities and rescue workers raced to reach isolated mountain communities. [Updated, 9:10 a.m. PDT Sept. 25: Officials in Baluchistan province later raised the death toll to 328, with 495 people injured. ] Local television images from the southwestern area of earthquake-prone Baluchistan showed the tangled remains of people's lives after the disaster -- vast fields of mud, bricks, broken furniture, battered household items and traditional string beds.
WORLD
August 13, 2013 | By Nasir Khan and Mark Magnier
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - With charges, counter-charges and distrust wafting across the disputed Pakistan-India border like acrid smoke, news spread quickly across South Asia on Tuesday that Pakistan's new leader had urged both countries to come together with a “clean heart” and resolve all outstanding issues in the interest of a new beginning. The reported comments by Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif suggested a willingness to push back at the growing recriminations on both sides following a series of clashes in recent days along the de facto border in Kashmir, known as the Line of Control.
WORLD
August 9, 2013 | By Nasir Khan and Mark Magnier
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - The American Consulate in Pakistan's second-largest city was closed and its employees evacuated, a U.S. State Department spokeswoman said Friday, in response to a specific threat and in line with a broader warning that Americans should avoid traveling to Pakistan. Spokeswoman Meghan Gregonis did not disclose details of the threat, which she said was specific to Lahore. It wasn't immediately clear whether the danger was linked to an advisory this week about a possible Al Qaeda attack that prompted Washington to temporarily close more than 20 diplomatic missions in Africa, the Middle East and South Asia.
WORLD
August 1, 2013 | By Alex Rodriguez
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - The U.S. and Pakistan will revive high-level talks on a host of issues including counterterrorism cooperation and preventing militancy along the Afghan-Pakistani border, and economic revitalization in the nuclear-armed South Asian nation, Secretary of State John F. Kerry announced Thursday after meeting with Pakistan's new civilian leadership. Those negotiations, known to both countries as their “strategic dialogue,” had been on hold since 2011, when relations between Islamabad and Washington veered toward collapse.
WORLD
May 24, 2013 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - President Obama's commitment to scaling back the use of unmanned aircraft to kill suspected terrorists could pave the way for improved relations between the United States and Pakistan, analysts and political leaders said Friday. But the Pakistani government maintained its insistence that the drone campaign does more harm than good and should be shut down. Obama's decision to continue using targeted killings abroad while imposing restrictions that could significantly reduce the frequency of drone strikes comes at a particularly sensitive time for Islamabad as it prepares for a new civilian government led by Nawaz Sharif, who served as prime minister in the 1990s.
WORLD
April 16, 2013 | By Alex Rodriguez and Ramin Mostaghim
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan -- Dozens of people were reportedly killed in Pakistan after a massive earthquake struck a remote border area of neighboring Iran on Tuesday. Yet in Iran, officials said the disaster was far less devastating than originally feared, telling reporters there were no deaths on Iranian soil. In Pakistan, television and Dawn newspaper cited officials as confirming 34 deaths in Baluchistan province as hundreds of houses collapsed Tuesday. The Associated Press later reported the same number of casualties and at least 80 more people injured in Pakistan, citing a military official.
WORLD
October 20, 2011 | Alex Rodriguez and Laura King, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. needs Pakistan's cooperation to succeed against an insurgent group that uses sanctuaries along the Afghan border from which to attack American and Afghan forces. But so far, Washington has failed to entice that cooperation — or coerce it through threats to pull billions of dollars in aid. On Thursday, Washington embarked on a get-tough strategy — sending its top diplomat along with its top intelligence and military officers to Islamabad to deliver the blunt message: Whether or not Pakistan chooses to help, the U.S. will continue to fight the Haqqani network inside Afghanistan while seeking a negotiated end to the decade-old Afghan conflict that has taken the lives of more than 1,800 U.S. soldiers and thousands of Afghan civilians.
WORLD
October 29, 2009 | Alex Rodriguez
Reporting from Islamabad, Pakistan, and Peshawar, Pakistan -- A car bomb ripped through a crowded market in the northwest city of Peshawar today and killed more than 80 people, the latest attack in a deadly barrage of violence that has swept Pakistan while the military battles Taliban militants along the Afghan border. The blast occurred as Secretary of State Hillary Clinton began a three-day visit to Pakistan to discuss the U.S.-led war on terror and counter growing anti-American sentiment in this nuclear-armed nation.
WORLD
January 11, 2013 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - The "Arab Spring" seems a long way from Pakistan's winter of discontent. Still, when religious scholar Tahirul Qadri talks about his hopes for the massive rally he is planning in Islamabad on Monday, one that he hopes will lure more than a million people into the streets of the quiet capital, the image he uses is that of Cairo's Tahrir Square. Government leaders have tried to warn the gray-bearded mullah, respected by many for his denunciations of the Taliban and his espousal of tolerance, that a gathering on the scale he is planning would give militants the opportunity to carry out a major terrorist act. Pakistanis haven't forgotten that it was at a large rally in Islamabad's twin city, Rawalpindi, that former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto was assassinated by a suicide bomber in 2007.
OPINION
June 19, 2012 | By Andrew J. Bacevich
The history of U.S.-Pakistani relations is one of wild swings between feigned friendship and ill-disguised mistrust. When the United States needs Pakistan, Washington showers Islamabad with money, weapons and expressions of high esteem. Once the need wanes, the gratuities cease, often with brutal abruptness. Instead of largesse, Pakistan gets lectures, with the instruction seldom well received. The events of 9/11inaugurated the relationship's most recent period of contrived warmth.
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