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NEWS
February 19, 1990
About 300 Iranians and Iranian-Americans clustered outside the Federal Building in Westwoodlate Sunday afternoon, protesting alleged human rights violations by the Iranian government and calling for "death to the Islamic republic."
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WORLD
February 19, 2014 | By Alexandra Sandels and Ramin Mostaghim
BEIRUT - A new, lesbian-themed music video by expatriate Iranian pop star Googoosh has sparked sharp debate among Iranians and controversy on social media forums in the Islamic Republic. It started on Valentine's Day when the video for Googoosh's latest song, "Behesht," or Heaven, dropped like a bombshell on the singer´s official Facebook page , which boasts more than 1,5 million followers. The video features a lesbian couple and seems to champion gay rights.  “I am scared of this doubt, I am scared of this blind alley,” Googoosh, 64, croons to the backdrop of a video showing a couple played by two well-known Iranian actresses.
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NEWS
September 28, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time since glasnost liberated the millions of Muslims of Soviet Central Asia, Dushanbe's main mosques were empty Friday. And for the first time that anyone here could recall, the city's five Islamic priests canceled their sacred Friday prayers. It was the latest round in Soviet Central Asia's 70-year war between Islam and communism.
WORLD
December 7, 2013 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - President Obama signaled Saturday that he was prepared to allow Iran to enrich uranium on its own soil, saying that a final deal could be structured to prevent Tehran from developing a nuclear bomb. Obama also put the odds of success for the upcoming international negotiations with Iran at not "more than 50-50. " Seeking to rebut criticism of a just-completed interim nuclear deal with the Islamic Republic, Obama said in an appearance sponsored by the Brookings Institution's Saban Center for Middle East Policy that it was not realistic to try to force Iran to dismantle all of its multibillion-dollar nuclear complex.
NEWS
September 29, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's a wry joke going around the Iranian capital these days. Did you know, a wag will ask, that Iranian television is now black and white? Black turban on channel one, white turban on channel two. The moral of this story is, just when the world was awaiting the full-color debut of a new Islamic republic--a kinder, gentler Iran under the stewardship of President Hashemi Rafsanjani, with new openings to the West and a more tolerant social climate at home--the mullahs are back.
WORLD
September 14, 2008 | Borzou Daragahi, Times Staff Writer
The plot may seem familiar: A group of wayward and foulmouthed young men volunteer to go to the front because of their devotion to their bomber-jacket-wearing ringleader. They are wisecracking, rude and undisciplined, singing bawdy songs and breaking prohibitions against smoking and gambling. But eventually they become heroes, proving themselves on the battlefield. But in the Islamic Republic of Iran, such a less-than-holy depiction of the men who fought the "War of Sacred Defense," as the 1980s conflagration with Iraq is sometimes called, was groundbreaking.
OPINION
February 7, 2010 | By Joshua Prager
On June 20, a young Iranian woman was shot dead at one of the mass protests that followed the contested re- election of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. Millions of people around the world watched video of Neda Agha-Soltan hemorrhaging on Tehran's Karegar Street, and hers became the tragic, beautiful and galvanizing face of the reform movement in Iran. Witnesses implicated a member of the Basij, the governmental militia, in Agha-Soltan's death. But an Iranian ambassador and ayatollah quickly pinned her shooting on the CIA and her fellow protesters, while a broadcasting official -- and a government-sponsored documentary that aired last month -- said the death had been simulated by the Western news media and by Agha-Soltan herself.
NEWS
June 7, 1992 | JOHN POMFRET, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Haider Abdullah leaned back in his makeshift market stall and pointed to the red television set beneath his arm. "This?" he said with a toothy grin. "It was free." Business is booming at the Thieves' Market in Kabul these days thanks to lawlessness in the streets. Widespread looting and car theft have accompanied the establishment of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan.
WORLD
November 27, 2007 | Borzou Daragahi, Times Staff Writer
A brunet in a yellow strapless gown strolls with her friends through the old city, while nearby a pair of young toughs on Kawasaki motorbikes rocket down the street, helmets off. The beat here is set to the rhythm of two new radio stations, 97.3 Farah FM and 105.7 Mix FM, that pump out tunes by the Foo Fighters and 50 Cent.
NEWS
November 23, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite growing evidence that Iran is pushing for an early end to the Lebanon hostage crisis and attempting to ease its international isolation, the Bush Administration is resisting suggestions--some from within its own ranks--that it should move to improve relations with the Islamic republic. For now, the Administration has concluded it should maintain its deep-freeze policy toward Iran, even if all Western hostages are released soon, a senior Administration official said.
WORLD
November 27, 2013 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - As they prepare for battle over the new deal to limit Iran's nuclear program, the accord's supporters and foes are calibrating strategies based on their reading of Americans' conflicted views about the Islamic Republic. American war-weariness forms a big part of the Obama administration's campaign for the accord, a preliminary agreement to curb Iran's disputed nuclear program. Administration officials have said that without a diplomatic deal, the country would be on a "march to war. " For now, the administration appears to have the upper hand.
WORLD
November 24, 2013 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Patrick J. McDonnell
TEHRAN - As world powers in Geneva negotiate the future of Iran's nuclear development program, Islamist hard-liners here continue to warn of a deceitful, perfidious West scheming to enfeeble the Islamic Republic. Yet in the trendy, smoke-filled cafes of this busy capital city, ritualistic denunciations of the United States are as passe as instant coffee among the mostly young, jeans-clad set. "In art, in fashion, in cinema and in our daily lifestyle, we copycat American culture," said Sarah, proprietor of a cozy cafe in the basement of a high-rise in northwest Tehran.
WORLD
September 24, 2013 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM -- Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said Tuesday that he welcomed President Obama's comments about Iran to the United Nations but remains wary of the Islamic Republic's intentions . Delivering a video statement that was issued between Obama's speech and that of Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, Netanyahu said he appreciates Obama's saying that Iran will have to back its conciliatory words with "action that is  transparent and...
WORLD
September 7, 2013 | By Edmund Sanders
JERUSALEM -- Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu reacted coolly Saturday to comments on Twitter over the weekend by Iran's foreign minister, and purportedly its new president, wishing Jews a happy new year on the holiday of Rosh Hashanah. Netanyahu, who has been urging the United States and the international community to crack down on Iran's disputed nuclear program, scoffed at suggestions that the widely circulated messages signal a more moderate approach by Iran and accused the Islamic Republic of trying to fool the world.
WORLD
August 3, 2013 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Patrick J. McDonnell
TEHRAN - Hassan Rouhani became the seventh president of the Islamic Republic of Iran on Saturday, officially receiving the endorsement of the nation's supreme leader at a formal ceremony here in the capital. Rouhani, 64, a cleric considered a moderate pragmatist, replaced outgoing two-term President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, who was barred from seeking a third term. Rouhani was elected in June in a surprise landslide victory. Rouhani's formal inauguration and swearing-in was scheduled for Sunday, but Saturday marked the new president's ascension to office.
OPINION
July 29, 2013 | By Ray Takeyh
Iran will inaugurate its seventh president on Aug. 4. Hassan Rouhani assumes power at a time when the Islamic Republic is confronting international isolation and simmering domestic discontent. He has already changed the tone of the regime, promising moderation and a fresh look at Iran's many quandaries. The temptation to embrace an Iranian politician who speaks the language of pragmatism may prove irresistible. However, as Rouhani settles into office, it is best to hold back and see how much authority he will have on the nuclear issue and how much of his political capital he is willing to spend on redeeming his campaign pledges.
BOOKS
December 27, 1987 | Robin Wright, Wright, a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, is a former Middle East correspondent and the author of "Sacred Rage: The Wrath of Militant Islam." and
With two dozen U.S. warships and more than 25,000 American troops deployed in the Persian Gulf, Iran and its intentions are, once again, agonizing Washington's policy-makers. Indeed, the potential for conflict between the United States and the Islamic Republic in the strategic oil sea lanes makes the 1979-'81 hostage trauma seem small scale.
WORLD
February 16, 2010 | By Borzou Daragahi
Bluntly warning that Iran is sliding into military dictatorship, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton told an audience in Qatar on Monday that economic sanctions against the Islamic Republic should be increasingly aimed at its elite Revolutionary Guard. Clinton, who was in Doha, the capital, for a conference on relations between the U.S. and the Islamic world, appeared to suggest that such a strategy could help rein in the ideologically motivated branch of the Iranian military by widening rifts within Iran's domestic political establishment.
WORLD
July 24, 2013 | By Alexandra Sandels and Ramin Mostaghim
BEIRUT -- Iran's expatriate filmmaker Mohsen Makhmalbaf is facing withering condemnation in his homeland for attending a film festival in Israel, the Islamic Republi's archfoe. The acclaimed director, considered a pioneer of moviemaking in Iran, traveled to the Jerusalem Film Festival this month to screen his latest work, "The Gardener," which explores the conflict between two generations about the role of religion in society. Javad Shamgdari, the head of Iran's official cinema organization, penned a letter to the leadership of the Iranian cinema museum demanding the removal of all of the director's awards and trophies.
WORLD
July 16, 2013 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Alexandra Sandels
TEHRAN -- More than 200 steelworkers staged a demonstration Tuesday in front of the Iranian parliament, protesting layoffs and unpaid salaries in an illustration of the daunting economic challenges facing President-elect Hassan Rouhani. One of the laid-off workers told the semiofficial Iranian Labor News Agency that most were from the Zagros Steel Factory and had spent the night in a yard near the Tehran cemetery and on the grounds of the mausoleum of the late Ayatollah Ruholla Khomeini because they didn't have the money to pay for hotel rooms.  The demonstrators had traveled from the far-flung city of Qorveh, in Iran's Kurdistan province, and began their rally with a sit-in outside the presidential office Monday.
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