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Islamic World

NEWS
May 28, 1986 | Associated Press
An Islamic scholar and his wife were stabbed to death Tuesday, and the FBI joined the investigation because of the husband's connections to the Arab world, officials said. Ismail Faruqi, 65, and his wife, Lois, 59, an art scholar, were found dead with multiple wounds in their suburban Philadelphia home, police said. Their 27-year-old daughter, Anmar Zein, was seriously wounded.
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BOOKS
July 25, 2004 | Andrew J. Bacevich, Andrew J. Bacevich, a professor of international relations at Boston University, is the author of "American Empire: The Realities and Consequences of U.S. Diplomacy" and the forthcoming book "The New American Militarism."
TWO additions to the now-sagging bookshelf labeled "Empire, American, New" could hardly be more dissimilar, offering radically divergent explanations for how and why U.S. foreign policy in recent years went off the rails and equally different (and simplistic) prescriptions for what's needed to get us out of our current mess. Written by a senior counterintelligence official at the CIA, "Imperial Hubris" offers a scathing critique of the U.S. government's conduct of its war on terror.
OPINION
September 6, 2006
Re "On Israel, kid gloves -- or else," Opinion, Sept. 1 Rosa Brooks makes some valid points in her discussion of how criticism of Israel is sometimes unfairly equated with anti-Semitism. She errs, however, when she states, "Israeli policies are a major source of discord in the Islamic world" and that resentment of those policies fuels "terrorism and instability both in Israel and around the globe." Substitute the phrase "Israel's existence" for "Israeli policies" and she has it right.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2006
RE "Bush Film: Original or Outrageous?" by Tina Daunt, Sept. 1: I don't need to see "Death of a President" to know I have a huge problem with the premise of the film. My vote goes in the inappropriate column because the film obviously panders to rabid Bush haters and sends an absolutely screwy message to our enemies in the Islamic world. Many films have been made about the assassination of fictional presidents, and Gabriel Range's choice to depict a current and actual president speaks to a very sick mentality.
WORLD
December 6, 2002 | James Gerstenzang, Times Staff Writer
Faced with a negative perception of the United States in the Islamic world, President Bush visited a mosque Thursday as his administration sought to deepen support for the international campaign against terrorism. His trip through snowy streets to the Islamic Center of Washington reflected what the White House has presented as a constant theme since the Sept. 11 attacks -- the importance of reaching out to Muslims, made all the more meaningful as the confrontation with Iraq grows more tense.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1989 | SHAUL BAKHASH, Shaul Bakhash is a professor of history at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va. and the author of "The Reign of the Ayatollahs: Iran and the Islamic Revolution." and
The era of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, who died in Tehran on Saturday, witnessed a radical reversal in Iran's regional and international role and in many of its foreign policies. Khomeini, claiming spiritual leadership of the Islamic world, believed that he had a special mission: to reinvigorate the Muslim community for confrontation with the two hostile superpowers and an exploitative West. Under Khomeini, Iran's foreign policy underwent dramatic changes. The shah viewed the United States as Iran's closest ally; Khomeini labeled it the "Great Satan" and Iran's principal enemy.
OPINION
February 10, 2006
Re "What would Muhammad do?" Opinion, Feb. 9 Because Jamil Momand is an educated man, it is difficult to understand how his commentary could be so far off the mark. One does not have to be an authority on Islam to know why so many Muslims are reacting with violence to the cartoons lampooning the prophet Muhammad. Islamic teachings have offered young followers a confused, if not duplicitous, code concerning the use of violence to resolve conflict. Extremist imams and terrorists around the world have seized on these ambiguities to recruit killers.
OPINION
December 7, 1997 | Robin Wright, Robin Wright, who covers global issues for The Times, is the author of "Sacred Rage: The Wrath of Militant Islam."
After two decades of sometimes bloody rivalries, the disparate faces of Islam gather in Tehran this week to address a critical issue: Can they ever reconcile? Could they even develop a common vision? The answer, in the form of a much-anticipated Tehran Declaration, will affect everything from the price of oil in U.S. suburbs to the flash points of the post-Cold War world.
NEWS
October 10, 2001 | T. CHRISTIAN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As top delegates to the largest international Muslim organization gathered here Tuesday for an emergency summit, support emerged for a tentative backing of U.S. military action, as long as the endorsement was coupled with a demand for more attention to the Middle East peace process. The U.S. military campaign against Afghanistan dramatically altered the purpose of today's summit of the Organization of the Islamic Conference, called shortly after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.
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