Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsIslamic World
IN THE NEWS

Islamic World

OPINION
May 26, 2002 | MITCHELL KOSS, Mitchell Koss is a producer for Channel One News. His work has appeared on public television's "Nova" and "The News--Hour with Jim Lehrer" and on ABC and MTV.
At 11 on a Tuesday night a few weeks back, my colleagues and I were in a crowded barbershop in central Cairo. A television set in the corner of the shop was tuned to "Men Se Va Al Million," the most popular television program in Egypt. Reputedly it's the most popular show ever broadcast across the Arab world, which is not surprising, perhaps, given the success here in the United States of the show's English--language version, "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?" In a kind of affirmation of globalization, the men watching in the shop included us in the game, holding up their fingers after each question to show us the correct answer.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2002 | MARK SACHS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's taken decades upon decades for the global forces in play to create a world-changing event on the scale of the Sept. 11 terrorists attacks. Yet in one two-hour block tonight, "Muslims" manages to bring a crystalline focus to issues of kaleidoscopic complexity, resulting in an all-too-rare "special" that is worthy of that tag. The "Frontline" production (9 p.m.
OPINION
April 22, 2002
Ranan R. Lurie's April 17 commentary conjecturing the death of Osama bin Laden was not only racist but also naive. First, to speak of some "sword-waving" tradition in the Islamic world as though there was not an equally developed counterpart in our own culture ("axis of evil" ring any bells?) is a blatant attempt to create an "us and them" mentality. Further, likening Bin Laden to an "Islamic mini-god" in the eyes of his followers is sacrilegious (as calling George W. Bush America's "lord and savior" would be)
NEWS
March 3, 2002 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a gradual but increasingly visible change since Sept. 11, the United States is shifting its focus and priorities in the Islamic world away from Arab nations, particularly states caught up in the Arab-Israeli conflict, to a wider set of interests in Asia, Africa and the Persian Gulf, according to U.S. officials and regional experts. The terrorist attacks on New York and the Pentagon were the initial impetus, forcing the Bush administration to divert attention to Afghanistan and Pakistan.
NEWS
January 30, 2002 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first outline of a new political strategy to complement the war on terrorism, President Bush promised Tuesday that the United States will take advantage of a "great opportunity" to promote freedom, justice and equality among Islamic nations to counter the forces of terror.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 2002 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Sometimes it seems that wars over Islam are as fierce in the bookstores as they are on the battlefield. Since the Sept. 11 attacks, books on Islam are hot--and so is debate over the nature of this faith. Current top sellers are sharply divided in their esteem of Islam, from Steven Emerson's suspicious "American Jihad: The Terrorists Living Among Us," to Karen Armstrong's sympathetic "Islam: A Short History."
NEWS
January 6, 2002
Re "Hope for Jews, Muslims," Commentary, Dec. 30: Professor Benjamin Hubbard is a fine scholar, a great teacher and a man I'm proud to have as a friend. His commentary is thoughtful and well-written. But I must comment. May his last paragraph go from his keyboard to God's ears: "Hope has a power in and of itself to break deadlocks. May it prevail in the year ahead." But we in the West need more than hope--we need reality. Until a majority of Muslim clerics and scholars condemn suicide murders of innocent civilians (everywhere in the world!
NEWS
January 6, 2002 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sattar Chisti is a Taliban kind of guy. His heart burns with passion for Islam, and his mind seethes with the injustices of the West. Osama bin Laden? A wise man, a true believer. The World Trade Center? Everyone knows Bin Laden wasn't responsible. The Jews were. For an hour, hunkered down in his spice-laden cubicle in Quetta's teeming market, Chisti, 36, speaks of his grievances against the United States in the same soft, calm tones Bin Laden uses.
NEWS
December 28, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
The latest videotaped message from Osama bin Laden lay unnoticed for two days on a desk at the Al Jazeera television network in Qatar before someone realized its importance, a station official said Thursday. The tape from the world's most- wanted man, containing a fresh salvo of fiery anti-Western rhetoric, had been brought by courier from Pakistan, only to be overlooked on a secretary's desk.
NEWS
December 11, 2001 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No one expected Dia Richardson to get religion, and certainly not the one she got. After all, she had lived fast for many years. If the clubs were open, Richardson was there. At Thanksgiving dinner one year, her uncle--one of three Christian ministers in her family--asked her reprovingly, "Just how many beers are you going to drink?" "As many as I brought," she sassed. Then her friend Khadijah Shabazz, who is Muslim, invited Richardson to a mosque wedding in Culver City.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|