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March 27, 2013 | By Devorah Lauter, Los Angeles Times
PARIS - Stephane Charbonnier, known as Charb, sits calmly behind a desk in a large, messy office with no sign outside indicating the name of his publication. True, there is a riot police car stationed in the street, but basically, he says, he doesn't see what all the fuss is about. "It just so happens I'm more likely to get run over by a bicycle in Paris than get assassinated," says Charb, the soft-spoken editor of Charlie Hebdo, a left-leaning French satirical weekly, which since 2006 has been sued, threatened and firebombed for its sporadic publication of cartoons mocking the Muslim prophet Muhammad.
September 26, 2011 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
Four decades ago, a rangy civil servant in charge of overseeing the forested ridges and brick-hut villages of Pakistan's Swat Valley sought a pastime to get through slow days. He dabbled in poetry, composing haiku in longhand. His wife read the poems and called them "rubbish. " "Why don't you write about something you know?" Jamil Ahmad recalled his wife, Helga, telling him. She said his focus should be the tribes of Pakistan's northwest frontier, where Ahmad had worked for 15 years.
May 11, 2003 | Chris Brummitt, Associated Press Writer
The shaman took hold of my little finger, mumbled in Arabic, then pronounced his diagnosis for the mysterious malaise that had plagued me for months. "You have walked over a grave in a jungle," he said as an afternoon rainstorm rattled the tin roof of his gloomy sitting room. "You must have picked something up." No diagnosis is too strange for Indonesia's shamans -- known here as dukun -- who attract millions of patients despite increased awareness of modern medical treatment.
December 24, 2011 | By Raja Abdulrahim, Los Angeles Times
With Christmas comes tradition in the Traband household: A plate of cookies for Santa and carrots for his reindeer. A stocking full of treats for Omar, the family dog. A noble fir decorated with golden garland and keepsake ornaments. But there is no angel atop the tree. Sahira Traband feels that would conflict with her family's faith. They are Muslims. "The magic of Christmas is the part we celebrate," said Traband, 45. "We didn't get into the whole religious thing.
May 11, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Dozens of suspected Islamic insurgents ambushed a military convoy transporting bodyguards for the interior and finance ministers, killing four soldiers, police said. In Mogadishu, a gunfight between Islamic militias and Ethiopian troops left two civilians dead, witnesses said. The two attacks capped a week of some of the worst violence in Somalia in recent months. At least 38 people died in three days of attacks by suspected Islamic insurgents.
August 13, 2010 | By Raja Abdulrahim, Los Angeles Times
As men and women in makeshift togas danced and jumped to booming house music, Omar Younis made out with a woman he had met just a few hours earlier at her 25th-birthday dinner. A friend of a friend, the woman was Younis' fixation of the night. He had accompanied her from the restaurant to a karaoke bar — where he promised to get up and sing just for her but never did — and was now at a San Francisco nightclub, hoping to end the night with her. As make-believe Romans danced in the dimly lit club, Younis and the woman, an aspiring actress, kissed in various alcoves as his friends watched with amusement.
July 20, 1986 | Donald Shojai, Shojai is a member of the Africa and Middle East Studies Committee at San Diego State University
In an earlier book, "Religion and Politics in Iran" (1983), editor Nikki R. Keddie, a professor of history at UCLA and a leading authority on modern Iran, drew on the collaborative effort of specialists in several fields to show how Shia Islam--traditionally a religious movement with quietist origins and an apolitical doctrine--became, in the 20th Century, the driving force of the Iranian Revolution.
December 27, 1999
The Islamic community in Long Beach would like to thank you for your articles about Ramadan. You really brought joy to our hearts. --ASEM ABUSIR Via e-mail
December 28, 2006
Re "Tick, tick, tick," editorial, Dec. 26 Somalia is an event waiting to explode, and it may ignite World War III. Because Somalia juts into the Gulf of Aden, any government that controls this country also controls the flow of oil to the Western world. If a bellicose, fundamentalist Islamic regime gets control of Somalia, the oil that fuels the American economy and military will be shifted to the pan-Islamic fascist movement led by Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. What is happening in Somalia needs to be taken seriously and not dismissed as just another incident of Yankee imperialism.
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