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August 14, 2010 | Tim Rutten
Two millenniums ago, an itinerant young Galilean teacher with a fondness for parables told one of his audiences that no sensible person ever would pour new wine into old wineskins. The skins, after all, would burst, and ruin would follow. It's an apt metaphor for this increasingly frenzied and foolish moment in our history. Rising tides of anti-Muslim hysteria and animosity toward undocumented immigrants, most of whom are Latinos (the bitter new wine), have conjoined and are forcing us toward an eerie recapitulation of the Nativist movements (the dreary old skin)
August 13, 2010 | By Raja Abdulrahim, Los Angeles Times
As men and women in makeshift togas danced and jumped to booming house music, Omar Younis made out with a woman he had met just a few hours earlier at her 25th-birthday dinner. A friend of a friend, the woman was Younis' fixation of the night. He had accompanied her from the restaurant to a karaoke bar — where he promised to get up and sing just for her but never did — and was now at a San Francisco nightclub, hoping to end the night with her. As make-believe Romans danced in the dimly lit club, Younis and the woman, an aspiring actress, kissed in various alcoves as his friends watched with amusement.
March 14, 2011 | By Jay Winter
To understand the Muslim Brotherhood, and to assess its role today in a shifting Middle East, it is necessary to first examine the forces that led to the organization's birth. And that takes us back to the collapse of the Ottoman Empire during World War I. The Ottoman Empire had been, before World War I, the strongest and most visible face of Islam in the world. At its height in the 16th and 17th centuries, it controlled a vast swath of territory that extended from southeastern Europe into Asia and northern Africa.
May 11, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Dozens of suspected Islamic insurgents ambushed a military convoy transporting bodyguards for the interior and finance ministers, killing four soldiers, police said. In Mogadishu, a gunfight between Islamic militias and Ethiopian troops left two civilians dead, witnesses said. The two attacks capped a week of some of the worst violence in Somalia in recent months. At least 38 people died in three days of attacks by suspected Islamic insurgents.
September 26, 2011 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
Four decades ago, a rangy civil servant in charge of overseeing the forested ridges and brick-hut villages of Pakistan's Swat Valley sought a pastime to get through slow days. He dabbled in poetry, composing haiku in longhand. His wife read the poems and called them "rubbish. " "Why don't you write about something you know?" Jamil Ahmad recalled his wife, Helga, telling him. She said his focus should be the tribes of Pakistan's northwest frontier, where Ahmad had worked for 15 years.
December 27, 1999
The Islamic community in Long Beach would like to thank you for your articles about Ramadan. You really brought joy to our hearts. --ASEM ABUSIR Via e-mail
December 28, 2006
Re "Tick, tick, tick," editorial, Dec. 26 Somalia is an event waiting to explode, and it may ignite World War III. Because Somalia juts into the Gulf of Aden, any government that controls this country also controls the flow of oil to the Western world. If a bellicose, fundamentalist Islamic regime gets control of Somalia, the oil that fuels the American economy and military will be shifted to the pan-Islamic fascist movement led by Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. What is happening in Somalia needs to be taken seriously and not dismissed as just another incident of Yankee imperialism.
October 1, 2011 | By Raheem Salman, Los Angeles Times
When Suad Dabbagh and two other women graduated from Iraq's Judicial Institute in 1979, they became the first female judges in a nation run by Saddam Hussein. The novelty led to a deluge of news photo and interview requests. But progress was short-lived. By the mid-1980s, when Hussein's government once again stopped accepting women in its judicial study program, there were only six female judges. These days, after eight wrenching years of invasion, occupation and rebuilding, the outlook is different: There are 72 female judges working in Iraqi courts.
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