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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 2011 | By Raja Abdulrahim, Los Angeles Times
With Christmas comes tradition in the Traband household: A plate of cookies for Santa and carrots for his reindeer. A stocking full of treats for Omar, the family dog. A noble fir decorated with golden garland and keepsake ornaments. But there is no angel atop the tree. Sahira Traband feels that would conflict with her family's faith. They are Muslims. "The magic of Christmas is the part we celebrate," said Traband, 45. "We didn't get into the whole religious thing.
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OPINION
March 14, 2011 | By Jay Winter
To understand the Muslim Brotherhood, and to assess its role today in a shifting Middle East, it is necessary to first examine the forces that led to the organization's birth. And that takes us back to the collapse of the Ottoman Empire during World War I. The Ottoman Empire had been, before World War I, the strongest and most visible face of Islam in the world. At its height in the 16th and 17th centuries, it controlled a vast swath of territory that extended from southeastern Europe into Asia and northern Africa.
NEWS
December 27, 1999
The Islamic community in Long Beach would like to thank you for your articles about Ramadan. You really brought joy to our hearts. --ASEM ABUSIR Via e-mail
OPINION
December 28, 2006
Re "Tick, tick, tick," editorial, Dec. 26 Somalia is an event waiting to explode, and it may ignite World War III. Because Somalia juts into the Gulf of Aden, any government that controls this country also controls the flow of oil to the Western world. If a bellicose, fundamentalist Islamic regime gets control of Somalia, the oil that fuels the American economy and military will be shifted to the pan-Islamic fascist movement led by Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. What is happening in Somalia needs to be taken seriously and not dismissed as just another incident of Yankee imperialism.
WORLD
October 1, 2011 | By Raheem Salman, Los Angeles Times
When Suad Dabbagh and two other women graduated from Iraq's Judicial Institute in 1979, they became the first female judges in a nation run by Saddam Hussein. The novelty led to a deluge of news photo and interview requests. But progress was short-lived. By the mid-1980s, when Hussein's government once again stopped accepting women in its judicial study program, there were only six female judges. These days, after eight wrenching years of invasion, occupation and rebuilding, the outlook is different: There are 72 female judges working in Iraqi courts.
NEWS
February 16, 1988 | From Reuters
Afghanistan's Foreign Minister Abdul Wakil arrived from Damascus, Syria, on Monday on a tour of Islamic countries to brief officials on recent developments in his country including Moscow's announcement last week on troop withdrawals, the state-run news agency Petra said.
OPINION
February 24, 2004
Re "Iran Hard-Liners Win More Seats With Fewer Voters," Feb. 22: As the Iranian people successfully boycotted the sham elections last week, this victory begins a new chapter in their history. What is happening in Iran today is a post-Islamic renaissance signifying the end of an era consumed with the notion of "political Islam" and "Islamic democracy" and the dawn of an era defined by individual liberties, social freedoms and secular democracy, with the spread of these ideals in the region as its logical consequence.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2012 | By E. Scott Reckard, Andrew Tangel and Jim Puzzanghera
A shadowy but well organized hacker group in the Middle East has disrupted the electronic banking operations of America's largest financial institutions in recent days, underscoring U.S. vulnerability to online terrorism. A group identifying itself as Izz ad-Din al-Qassam Cyber Fighters attacked the websites of Wells Fargo, U.S. Bancorp and Bank of America. The strikes left customers temporarily unable to access their checking accounts, mortgages and other services. The banks said account and personal information for their tens of millions of online and mobile customers were not compromised.
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