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NEWS
October 23, 1987 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
These are sad times for Smith Islanders. Their island is eroding away. Many young Islanders are leaving because they see no future here. Retired crabber and oysterman Elmer L. Evans, 70, sighed and echoed the sentiments of the people of this tiny remote Chesapeake Bay island. "It's a shame. Smith Island has been inhabited 330 years, since 1657, mostly by the same families. Now the island is dying, coming to an end. It really is a pity." The end isn't imminent.
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WORLD
November 7, 2004 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
This 40-island archipelago is surrounded by the aqua-blue waters of the Caribbean, but some leaders here and in Canada see a brighter future as part of the Great White North. In pursuit of a winter escape, Canadians have been eyeing this sun-drenched diving paradise for decades. Some politicians looking for new markets think the Turks & Caicos would make a fine regional springboard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1999 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite eloquent pleas from sport fishermen and divers, the California State Lands Commission on Friday approved the dismantling of artificial Belmont Island off Seal Beach and relocation of its rock base to an artificial reef off Huntington Beach. Opponents had argued that the former oil production facility provides a reef-like habitat to scores of sea creatures. "I'm saddened to see the political process does not put together the science needed to see . . .
NEWS
May 10, 2000 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Filipinos call Jolo the forgotten island. It is no more than a jungle-covered speck at the nation's southern tip. Even the mayor of the town of Jolo finds life so dull here that he lives in Zamboanga, three hours northeast by boat on another island. There hasn't been much of a foreign presence on Jolo since the Peace Corps pulled out in 1974, and so few tourists come that the occasional backpacker who shows up on the dawn ferry draws curious stares.
TRAVEL
May 28, 2006 | Beverly Beyette, Times Staff Writer
TAKE a tribe of international adventure-seekers and a remote South Pacific island and what do you get? In this case, not reality TV. Two 26-year-old British entrepreneurs, Ben Keene (a.k.a. Chief Bengazi) and Mark James (a.k.a. Chief Marika), are seeking 5,000 people to join Tribewanted.com, a sort of tribal timeshare with a three-year lease on a Fijian island. The goal: to build a sustainable eco-community and keep at bay developers with dreams of massive hotel complexes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2003 | Hilda M. Munoz, Times Staff Writer
Thanks to the donations of well-heeled yacht owners, Orange Coast College has assembled a first-class armada over the years. Students can sail across the Pacific or even circle the globe aboard yachts that once belonged to the rich and famous. Now the Costa Mesa college's sailing program has somewhere to go: its own private island. The 36-acre island, off the coast of British Columbia, is known locally as Rabbit Island, an uninhabited chunk of land thick with pines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2009 | Jia-Rui Chong
A major earthquake in the Bay Area could flood numerous islands in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, cripple the state's water system and cost billions of dollars, according to a state report released Friday. The report, from the Department of Water Resources, found there is a 40% probability of an earthquake of magnitude 6.7 or higher causing 27 or more islands to flood at the same time in the next 25 years.
NEWS
March 16, 1995 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Peter Jack held his palms to the beating sun in a gesture of despair. "Our lives have been really hurt by logging," Jack said. "The bulldozers have taken away the topsoil, and now we can't grow potatoes or yams in our gardens. Life is so different than before." Jack is a 40-year-old subsistence farmer whose family ekes out a living on the northern coast of Guadalcanal--a Pacific island, famous as the site of a savage battle between U.S.
NEWS
November 24, 1989 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here in the western Pacific, on a remote, reef-fringed isle in the South China Sea, is a scene out of Africa. Giraffes nibble the tops of tamarind trees. Herds of zebra gallop across a grassy savannah. Two male impala crash their sharp horns in battle. Gazelles graze near scores of topi, waterbuck and eland, all antelope-like animals imported from a continent away. Calauit is one of the late President Ferdinand E.
WORLD
October 18, 2006 | John M. Glionna, Times Staff Writer
These days, the forlorn widow never leaves her tiny shack in this bustling island village. She sits in the doorway, an emotional shut-in who rubs her painfully bloated legs and feet as she peers out longingly at a world that shuns her. "I am too ashamed to go outside," says Unas, a 48-year-old mother of six, her dark eyes welling with tears. "People look at me like I am something evil. I see it in their eyes."
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