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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1988
My grandfather who was an old Zionist, migrated from Russia to Palestine around World War I. In 1919, upon hearing that Arabs slaughtered most of the Jews of Hebron he said: "If they (the Arabs) do not come up to our moral standard, in time, in order to survive, we will be forced to come down to theirs." Grandfather Noah died at the age of 84 in 1961 too early to be recognized as a prophet. AVIK GILBOA Los Angeles
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OPINION
February 28, 2014 | By Patrick Tyler
Israelis and Palestinians are facing their most difficult negotiation since Menachem Begin flew west to face Egyptian President Anwar Sadat a generation ago at Camp David. If Israel were to end its long occupation, if Palestinians were to unite and forswear violence, if two states were able to share an eternal capital in Jerusalem and bind up the wounds of their long enmity, then a viable Palestinian state could emerge to live in peace with its most prominent and powerful neighbor. Sadly, the final hurdles that diplomats, chief among them Secretary of State John F. Kerry, face in organizing a new negotiation are shaped by preconditions.
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WORLD
April 7, 2011 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
It's easy to conjure the village that once was, hidden deep in a picturesque valley at the western gateway to Jerusalem, almost buried by blooming almond trees, tangled grapevines and a carpet of yellow wildflowers. The roofs and window shutters are long gone from the old stone houses, but decorative brickwork around the doorways and broken staircases bears witness to a bygone prosperity. The freshwater spring was paved over years ago, but the water still gurgles down the main road, just as it did more than 60 years ago. Homeless addicts sleep in the former mayor's house and sunlight floods through arched mosque windows, illuminating trash and debris.
WORLD
December 9, 2013 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM -- In a rare example of regional cooperation, Israeli, Palestinian and Jordanian officials have signed an agreement aimed at generating new water sources for all three and saving the Dead Sea, a unique nature site and prime economic asset. A memorandum of understanding was signed at the World Bank headquarters in Washington on Monday by the ministers responsible for water in the three governments: Silvan Shalom of Israel, Hazem Nasser of Jordan and Shaddad Attili of the Palestinian Authority.
OPINION
May 28, 2006
Re "Paying for Israel's makeover," Opinion, May 22 The American taxpayer has been footing the bill for Israel's occupation of Palestinian land to the tune of $3 billion to $5 billion per year. Under the Fourth Geneva Convention, the annexation of occupied territory is illegal. In the interest of peace, every single Israeli settlement on Palestinian land should be dismantled immediately. And in the interest of justice, Israel should repay American taxpayers for every dollar that was misappropriated into this illegal venture.
OPINION
May 30, 2013 | By Aaron David Miller
Getting into wars is easier than getting out of them. Could the same logic apply to peace conferences? Indeed, could U.S. diplomacy - however well intentioned - actually make matters worse? Secretary of State John F. Kerry has two diplomatic tracks in the works: ending a civil war in Syria and promoting a peace between Israelis and Palestinians. Both will be difficult to get started, but the real challenge will come the day after. Diplomatic conferences and events are usually good for one of two things: launching a serious process of negotiation or concluding one. What the U.S. confronts with both the Syrian civil war and the impasse in the Israeli-Palestinian peace process is a kind of twilight zone that's betwixt and between.
OPINION
November 23, 2012 | By Chuck Freilich
Israelis cynically refer to the repeated rounds of violence with the Arabs as "happiness," as in "it's happy today. " Before the cease-fire, as Hamas fired 1,000 rockets at Israel, it was indeed very "happy. " A diplomatic push put an end to the fighting, with intensive mediation efforts by Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon and Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi. If the truce holds, happiness will be behind us, for now. It is standard diplomatic practice to view crises as an opportunity to seek fundamental change in the situation.
OPINION
June 18, 2012 | By Shimon Peres
The Middle East is ailing. The malady stems from pervasive violence, shortages of food, water and educational opportunities, discrimination against women and - the most virulent cause of all - the absence of freedom. There can be no peace without freedom. Economic growth is impossible without integration in the free global economy. Tragically, this simple logic eludes us in the Middle East. The young generation, which makes up most of the region's population, insists on equal rights, access to education and the jobs created by science and technology.
WORLD
March 12, 2012 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
The toll on civilians from violence between the Israeli military and militants based in the Gaza Strip rose Monday as three Palestinians — a 15-year-old boy on his way to school and a father and daughter walking in the street — were killed by Israeli airstrikes, Palestinian officials said. Militants from Islamic Jihad and the Popular Resistance Committees on Monday fired rockets into southern Israel, hitting an empty kindergarten and damaging a residential structure in the city of Ashdod, injuring an elderly woman and another person with shrapnel.
WORLD
May 20, 2011 | Christi Parsons and Paul Richter and Edmund Sanders
President Obama plunged back into efforts to restart Middle East peace talks, pressuring both sides with a set of U.S. principles that appeared to catch Israeli leaders off guard and is likely to set up a tense meeting with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Friday. The president's speech Thursday, which the White House had billed as a major address on the Middle East, reflected a sense of impatience as Obama confronts the region's numerous problems. Aides said he was seeking to put the Israeli-Palestinian issues into the broader context of U.S. support for this year's uprisings challenging autocratic rulers in the Middle East and North Africa and to emphasize the urgency of resolving some of the region's problems.
WORLD
May 13, 2011 | By Paul Richter and Peter Nicholas, Los Angeles Times
Former Sen. George J. Mitchell is resigning as the Obama administration's special envoy for Middle East peace after a two-year effort failed to advance Israeli-Palestinian negotiations, White House officials said. Mitchell, acclaimed for his success in sealing a peace deal in Northern Ireland, began this mission optimistically but recently came to the conclusion that serious negotiations were a distant prospect and there was no need for him to continue, associates said. He had not visited the region since December.
WORLD
April 7, 2011 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
It's easy to conjure the village that once was, hidden deep in a picturesque valley at the western gateway to Jerusalem, almost buried by blooming almond trees, tangled grapevines and a carpet of yellow wildflowers. The roofs and window shutters are long gone from the old stone houses, but decorative brickwork around the doorways and broken staircases bears witness to a bygone prosperity. The freshwater spring was paved over years ago, but the water still gurgles down the main road, just as it did more than 60 years ago. Homeless addicts sleep in the former mayor's house and sunlight floods through arched mosque windows, illuminating trash and debris.
WORLD
September 1, 2010 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
As Israeli and Palestinian leaders headed to Washington for a much-anticipated peace summit, four Israelis were killed Tuesday near the disputed West Bank city of Hebron after their vehicle came under fire from unidentified gunmen. The militant Hamas movement, which rules the Gaza Strip, later took responsibility for the attack. Drive-by shootings on the roads near the Jewish settlement of Kiryat Arba adjoining Hebron and the Gush Etzion settlement block to the north are not uncommon, though Tuesday's attack was one of the deadliest in months.
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