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Israel Development And Redevelopment

NEWS
July 21, 1991 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a change of policy aimed at increasing the pressure on Israel to come to a Middle East peace conference, Saudi Arabia agreed Saturday to end its economic boycott of Israel if Israel stops building its settlements in the occupied territories. The Saudi action was announced here Saturday night after a meeting between Secretary of State James A. Baker III and King Fahd.
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NEWS
July 17, 1991 | JACK NELSON and WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Leaders of the major industrial democracies, declaring the new U.S. peace initiative in the Middle East a matter of "overriding importance," called Tuesday for suspension of both the Arab economic boycott against Israel and the Israeli policy of building settlements in the occupied territories. In a firm endorsement of the American plan for opening Arab-Israeli peace talks, which Secretary of State James A.
NEWS
June 23, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Israel's ambassador to Washington said the Jewish state must choose between U.S. aid to absorb a wave of Soviet immigrants or more settlements in the occupied territories. Ambassador Zalman Shoval said the continued building of settlements--which the United States has condemned as an obstacle to Mideast peace--has made Israel's efforts to obtain $10 billion in guaranteed housing loans difficult.
NEWS
June 17, 1991 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While leaders here and in Washington debate who is to blame for the failed effort to get Middle East peace talks started, the Israeli government is wasting little time in sketching out its plans for developing the contested West Bank and Gaza Strip.
NEWS
May 14, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sabri Gharib's farm was once this village's jewel, 35 acres of grape vines, peaches, wheat, even a few rose bushes wrapped luxuriantly around the crown of a hill. Atop the hill stood Gharib's house, its windows open to a dizzying blue circle of sky. Then a creeping line of red-tile roofs began making its way up the hill, and occupants of the new Jewish settlement below claimed 25 acres of Gharib's farm for their new Givon Hadashah community.
NEWS
May 12, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III arrived in Syria on Saturday, determined to use the Gulf Cooperation Council's new willingness to talk peace with Israel as a lever to bring President Hafez Assad's regime to the negotiating table. Baker's line of argument, a senior Administration official said, will be to warn Assad that he faces renewed isolation in the Arab world if he permits an Arab-Israeli peace conference to go ahead without him.
NEWS
May 7, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III, wearily describing the Arab-Israeli dispute as "this most intractable of all problems and conflicts," said Monday that he will return to the Middle East late this week for another try at jump-starting the peace process.
NEWS
April 24, 1991 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Israel's government does not interpret Secretary of State James A. Baker III's objection to settlements on occupied lands as a call for a definite freeze, Israeli officials say. Instead, they describe Baker as softly urging Israel to desist temporarily, for tactical motives, to get peace talks under way. "We do not feel that he is saying stop forever. Rather, he is saying that . . .
NEWS
April 16, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Increasingly concerned that the postwar chance for Middle East peace may not last long, Secretary of State James A. Baker III leaves today for a trip to Israel, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Syria and probably Jordan, just four days after returning from his last visit to the region.
NEWS
April 12, 1991 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Israel punctuated remarks by Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir, who said that settlements have nothing to do with a new U.S.-led peace plan, by revealing Thursday the start of construction of its first new settlement on the occupied West Bank in two years. The announcement, made on Israeli television and by a right-wing member of Shamir's ruling coalition, came just a day after Secretary of State James A.
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