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Israel Foreign Relations Lebanon

NEWS
June 11, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Lebanon's Iranian-backed Hezbollah said it was close to exchanging the remains of Israeli soldiers killed in southern Lebanon last year for the release of at least 100 Lebanese prisoners and bodies of Lebanese fighters. A source close to Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik Hariri said that talks were underway but that it was premature to discuss specifics. But the Shiite Muslim guerrilla group Amal said it will not return remains it holds of an Israeli soldier, complicating the reported deal.
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NEWS
April 2, 1998 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an official policy shift, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's national security Cabinet team Wednesday formally accepted a 20-year-old United Nations resolution calling for a unilateral Israeli withdrawal from Lebanon. The vote is symbolically important but unlikely to bring a quick end to the Israeli occupation of southern Lebanon, increasingly unpopular at home. This is the first time an Israeli government has accepted U.N.
NEWS
April 2, 1998 | Associated Press
Passed March 19, 1978--less than a week after Israel first invaded Lebanon, beginning an occupation that has cost the lives of an estimated 1,000 Israeli soldiers--the United Nations Security Council resolution in part: * Calls for strict respect for the territorial integrity, sovereignty and political independence of Lebanon. * Calls upon Israel immediately to cease military action and withdraw its forces from all Lebanese territory.
NEWS
December 1, 1998 | Associated Press
Israeli lawmakers lashed out at one another Monday about Israel's presence in southern Lebanon, where mounting troop casualties have stirred national debate. Yossi Beilin of the opposition Labor Party, who advocates a unilateral withdrawal from Lebanon, said leaving troops there means "certain death" for young Israeli soldiers. He charged Israeli Defense Minister Yitzhak Mordechai with "gambling with their lives."
NEWS
March 15, 1998 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty years after the U.N. Security Council demanded that Israel pull all its troops out of southern Lebanon "forthwith," the government of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu appears to be getting closer to doing just that.
NEWS
March 26, 1998 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 20 years, governments here have been calling for Israel to withdraw its troops from southern Lebanon. Now, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, tired of a protracted conflict that has caused a steady stream of casualties among his forces, says he wants to do just that. Lebanon ought to leap at this deal to regain control of about 10% of its land, right?
NEWS
June 19, 2000 | Associated Press
The U.N. Security Council on Sunday endorsed Secretary-General Kofi Annan's conclusion that Israel has completed its withdrawal of forces from southern Lebanon. With Lebanon insisting that Israel occupies part of its territory, Russia delayed its endorsement but finally agreed to a revised statement that notes "with serious concern reports of violations that have occurred since June 16." Annan had threatened to cancel a trip to Lebanon today unless the report was endorsed, diplomats said.
NEWS
June 1, 2000 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Offering his first extensive comments on the shifted political landscape of the Middle East, President Clinton said Wednesday that Israel's withdrawal from southern Lebanon was a daring step that brings greater urgency and opportunity to peace efforts. "All the balls are up in the air," he said. The president also blurred differences with European allies over a potential U.S.
NEWS
February 9, 2000 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A mere two months ago, the opportunity seemed ripe for Israel to finally, finally make peace with its last, most formidable Arab enemies: Syria, Lebanon and the Palestinians. The energy and determination of new Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak, the desire of key Arab leaders for resolution, the encouraging nudges from a Clinton administration looking for a legacy--all combined to pump life and spirit into a flagging peace process.
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