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NEWS
May 4, 1987 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
The Israeli government edged closer to a showdown on the issue of a Middle East peace conference Sunday as Foreign Minister Shimon Peres formally notified Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir that he intends to bring a conference plan to the Cabinet on Wednesday. In Jordan, meanwhile, Prime Minister Zaid Rifai, in an apparent challenge to the Israeli leadership, said it is futile to continue preparations for such a conference without an Israeli commitment to participate.
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NEWS
May 1, 1987 | Associated Press
Key points of a proposal for Arab-Israeli peace talks attributed to Israeli Foreign Minister Shimon Peres were published Thursday, and some officials suggested that the plan has been approved at least in part by Jordan's King Hussein. The officials who commented on Hussein's reported response to the plan are close to Peres, leader of the left-leaning Labor Party.
NEWS
March 28, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Former President Jimmy Carter urged Israeli leaders Friday to respond with "flexibility and generosity" to what he called a new receptive mood in the Arab world. He said Syrian President Hafez Assad told him this week that "he would be very glad to talk directly to Israel under the umbrella of an international conference."
NEWS
March 2, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir clashed Sunday with Foreign Minister Shimon Peres at a stormy Cabinet session over an international peace conference on the Middle East. Members of the 25-member Cabinet said, however, that they did not expect the confrontation to splinter Israel's fragile coalition government.
NEWS
February 28, 1987 | DAN FISHER and RICHARD C. PADDOCK, Times Staff Writers
In describing Israel's involvement in the arms-for-Iran deal with the United States, the Tower Commission report states that Israel was driven by motives that often clashed directly with those of Washington. "Israel had its own interests, some in direct conflict with those of the United States, in having the United States pursue the initiative," the report states. "For this reason, it had an incentive to keep the initiative alive.
NEWS
February 20, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir proposed Thursday an international peace conference on the Mideast--possibly at Camp David--to be attended by representatives of Israel, Egypt, Jordan, the Palestinians and the United States.
NEWS
February 18, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir, making his first visit to Washington since last fall's rotation put him into the top spot in Israel's coalition government, on Tuesday reiterated his rejection of an international Middle East peace conference as a backdrop to negotiations between his nation and Jordan. "I do not deny I strongly oppose an international conference," Shamir said after a nearly two-hour meeting with Secretary of State George P. Shultz at the State Department.
NEWS
January 9, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
U.S. special envoy Richard W. Murphy met with Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir on Thursday in what he described as a "constant search" for ways to revive efforts toward a comprehensive Middle East peace agreement. Murphy crossed the Jordan River into Israel earlier Thursday to give Shamir a report on his two days of talks with King Hussein and Jordanian officials in Amman, where no progress was evident. "This was a time for continued quiet diplomacy.
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