Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsIsrael Industry
IN THE NEWS

Israel Industry

FEATURED ARTICLES
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
March 1, 2013 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
RAHAT, Israel - On a patch of agricultural land outside Israel's only officially recognized Bedouin city, workers are laying concrete for what the government says will be a cornerstone of its policy to lure impoverished Arabs from barren Negev desert terrain to approved Israeli towns. Upon completion, Idan Hanegev is designed to be Israel's largest industrial park, an 860-acre site with 130 factories employing thousands of Bedouins, a once-nomadic people who have lived in the Negev and other parts of the region since long before the nation of Israel was established.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 6, 1988 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
A year ago, the Jordan Plastic Co. here worked three shifts, producing a bounty of goods for the home: garbage cans and bright wastepaper baskets, picnic plates and baby bathtubs with a built-in soap tray. Today, Tanas Abuaitah, a Palestinian, sits amid resounding silence at his family's hilltop factory. It is shuttered; its 200 workers are out of luck. No demand, too much stock, pressures from Palestinian militants, hassles with Israeli authorities. Close the door.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Al Schwimmer, a former aircraft engineer who smuggled American planes to Israel for its 1948 war of independence, founded its aerospace industry and later became a figure in the Iran-Contra affair, died in Tel Aviv on Friday, his 94th birthday. The cause was complications of pneumonia, according to a spokesperson for Israel Aerospace Industries, the company Schwimmer developed and led for more than 25 years. Schwimmer was a 2006 recipient of the Israel Prize, considered the state's highest honor.
NEWS
April 10, 1993 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an old Zionist dream, all the people of Israel were to be Jewish. Not just the doctors, merchants and professors, but the farmers, soldiers, police and even, the joke went, the crooks. With the government's closure last week of the occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip--barring Palestinians from jobs in Israeli construction, agriculture and industry--Israel found that it has fallen dangerously short of that Zionist ideal and become dependent on cheap Arab labor.
BUSINESS
September 22, 1993 | BENJAMIN LANDAU
ISSUE: With the recent breakthrough in relations between Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization, Israel's next major battle will be on the economic front-- perhaps even with old Middle Eastern enemies as allies. California businesses, historical suppliers of Israel's defense system, are well positioned to take advantage of a new era of peaceful economic development.
BUSINESS
March 14, 1999 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On one side of the small, smoky office sat a former Tel Aviv police officer, now working in copyright enforcement for the Israeli music industry. On the other, the owners of a Palestinian factory reputed to be churning out thousands of bootleg compact discs a day. Across a steel desk cluttered with overflowing ashtrays, tiny cups of sweet coffee and plates of baklava, the men spent nearly three hours one recent evening trading accusations. Then the Palestinians made a startling offer.
NEWS
February 13, 1998 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every so often, a whiff of hope blows into this grim town in southern Israel, circling its bygone textile mills and sending crowds of desperate people hurrying to the office of Moti Zohar. There, Zohar, the hard-pressed director of Ofakim's employment center, gently breaks the news that only a relative few will get the welding, construction and other generally low-paying jobs that have been advertised. The rest, as usual in Ofakim, will be out of luck.
NEWS
August 13, 2000 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This is not a country known for conspicuous consumption, which is why people are still talking about the party Chemi Peres, Rami Kalish and their partners at Polaris Venture Capital recently threw for 800 of their closest friends. Held beneath a vast pavilion at a bucolic retreat a few miles out of town, it featured a seemingly endless supply of food. There was a free bar and, for any teetotalers present, plenty of espresso and cappuccino.
NEWS
February 8, 1987 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
A diverse group of Israelis with little in common except leathery persistence and a sharp nose for opportunity is hoping to take a giant bite out of an obscure but growing $500-million worldwide market. You could call them farmers, but while their Zionist predecessors drained the swamps to raise citrus and vegetables, these modern Israelis create new marshes in order to "grow" their crop--crocodiles whose skins will later be turned into shoes, handbags and wallets.
NEWS
August 13, 2000 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This is not a country known for conspicuous consumption, which is why people are still talking about the party Chemi Peres, Rami Kalish and their partners at Polaris Venture Capital recently threw for 800 of their closest friends. Held beneath a vast pavilion at a bucolic retreat a few miles out of town, it featured a seemingly endless supply of food. There was a free bar and, for any teetotalers present, plenty of espresso and cappuccino.
BUSINESS
March 14, 1999 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On one side of the small, smoky office sat a former Tel Aviv police officer, now working in copyright enforcement for the Israeli music industry. On the other, the owners of a Palestinian factory reputed to be churning out thousands of bootleg compact discs a day. Across a steel desk cluttered with overflowing ashtrays, tiny cups of sweet coffee and plates of baklava, the men spent nearly three hours one recent evening trading accusations. Then the Palestinians made a startling offer.
NEWS
April 12, 1998 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gil Shwed spent the summer of 1993 in a sweltering apartment in this coastal city hammering away at a computer for 10 hours a day. At the end of each fevered shift, partner Shlomo Kramer took Shwed's place at the keyboard and kept pounding. Shwed and Kramer, both in their 20s at the time, had served together in the Israeli army, setting up and linking computer systems with different levels of security clearance, and they saw a golden opportunity in the growth of the Internet.
NEWS
February 13, 1998 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every so often, a whiff of hope blows into this grim town in southern Israel, circling its bygone textile mills and sending crowds of desperate people hurrying to the office of Moti Zohar. There, Zohar, the hard-pressed director of Ofakim's employment center, gently breaks the news that only a relative few will get the welding, construction and other generally low-paying jobs that have been advertised. The rest, as usual in Ofakim, will be out of luck.
BUSINESS
September 22, 1993 | BENJAMIN LANDAU
ISSUE: With the recent breakthrough in relations between Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization, Israel's next major battle will be on the economic front-- perhaps even with old Middle Eastern enemies as allies. California businesses, historical suppliers of Israel's defense system, are well positioned to take advantage of a new era of peaceful economic development.
NEWS
April 10, 1993 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an old Zionist dream, all the people of Israel were to be Jewish. Not just the doctors, merchants and professors, but the farmers, soldiers, police and even, the joke went, the crooks. With the government's closure last week of the occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip--barring Palestinians from jobs in Israeli construction, agriculture and industry--Israel found that it has fallen dangerously short of that Zionist ideal and become dependent on cheap Arab labor.
NEWS
April 12, 1998 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gil Shwed spent the summer of 1993 in a sweltering apartment in this coastal city hammering away at a computer for 10 hours a day. At the end of each fevered shift, partner Shlomo Kramer took Shwed's place at the keyboard and kept pounding. Shwed and Kramer, both in their 20s at the time, had served together in the Israeli army, setting up and linking computer systems with different levels of security clearance, and they saw a golden opportunity in the growth of the Internet.
WORLD
March 1, 2013 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
RAHAT, Israel - On a patch of agricultural land outside Israel's only officially recognized Bedouin city, workers are laying concrete for what the government says will be a cornerstone of its policy to lure impoverished Arabs from barren Negev desert terrain to approved Israeli towns. Upon completion, Idan Hanegev is designed to be Israel's largest industrial park, an 860-acre site with 130 factories employing thousands of Bedouins, a once-nomadic people who have lived in the Negev and other parts of the region since long before the nation of Israel was established.
NEWS
June 6, 1988 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
A year ago, the Jordan Plastic Co. here worked three shifts, producing a bounty of goods for the home: garbage cans and bright wastepaper baskets, picnic plates and baby bathtubs with a built-in soap tray. Today, Tanas Abuaitah, a Palestinian, sits amid resounding silence at his family's hilltop factory. It is shuttered; its 200 workers are out of luck. No demand, too much stock, pressures from Palestinian militants, hassles with Israeli authorities. Close the door.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|