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NEWS
August 16, 1999 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A controversy that Israelis dubbed "the turbine in the teapot" was quietly defused Sunday without causing a major crisis for the governing coalition of Prime Minister Ehud Barak. At least for now.
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NEWS
June 8, 1999 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ehud Barak may have been elected Israel's next prime minister by a huge majority, but the parliament elected along with him, and sworn in Monday, is the most splintered in the country's history. And that is the problem facing Barak, who is struggling to weave together disparate factions to form a coalition government that can give him sufficient backing as he pursues peace with the Arabs, reins in Jewish settlements and shifts influence away from the religious right.
NEWS
June 28, 1999 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The pieces of a new Israeli government were finally starting to fall into place Sunday, nearly six weeks after Ehud Barak's landslide election as prime minister stirred hopes of a more vigorous peace process in the Middle East. Rather than seizing immediate momentum, Barak has used the time since his election to engage in torturous negotiations with disparate political parties in a bid to form a broad coalition government.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1999 | LINDA WINER-BERNHEIMER, NEWSDAY
Ever since the recent Labor Party landslide in Israel, I've been thinking about David Hare. That is, I've been thinking about "Via Dolorosa," the English playwright's daringly reasonable and utterly captivating Broadway solo about the Middle East. Just as the recent high school shootings worried Hollywood enough to postpone the season finale of "Buffy the Vampire Slayer," it seems life also can have unpredictable effects--sometimes inconvenient ones--on perceptions of important art.
NEWS
February 3, 1999 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Israeli politics is starting to look like something out of a Jerry Springer show. With elections for prime minister and parliament still more than three months away, candidates Tuesday were flaying each other over who had the most fascist campaign slogan, who had done the most damage to the country and who was likely to do more damage in the future. But a new height in campaign hysterics was reached during one of Israel's foremost political talk shows.
NEWS
December 3, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Mouawiyah Masri, a Palestinian lawmaker who was shot and wounded in an assault by three masked men after signing an anti-corruption manifesto, said that at least one of the attackers is a member of the Palestinian security forces. Masri, 55, said he believes that he was attacked Wednesday because the declaration holds Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat directly responsible for rampant corruption in the government. The head of the Nablus police, Col.
NEWS
July 2, 1999 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ehud Barak, the former military commando who will be sworn in as prime minister of Israel next week after his May 17 landslide election, campaigned on a promise of change. "Israel wants change," was his slogan, the motto that filled airwaves and posters and undeniably helped catapult Barak to victory over beleaguered Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. Having finally wrestled together a coalition government that encompasses seven very different political parties, Barak is ready to take office.
NEWS
July 1, 1999 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the addition of a powerful ultra-Orthodox religious party, Prime Minister-elect Ehud Barak announced Wednesday that he has put together a long-awaited government that will lead Israel into sensitive new peace negotiations. Barak's coalition, forged after six weeks of marathon bargaining, appears to include a contradictory collection of politicians who run the gamut from black-hatted rabbis to khaki-clad leftists.
NEWS
March 18, 1999 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rabbi Aryeh Deri, one of Israel's most powerful politicians and a messiah-like hero to much of its large ultra-Orthodox underclass, was convicted on bribery charges Wednesday, triggering tearful protests and a political upheaval that will be felt for months to come.
NEWS
January 24, 1999 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu late Saturday fired his popular and politically ambitious defense minister, Yitzhak Mordechai, who was already on the verge of launching a challenge to the ruling party. Mordechai, who for days had vacillated on whether to leave Netanyahu, reacted angrily to what he saw as an unceremonious dumping. He lashed out at the prime minister and essentially declared his own candidacy for office with a new centrist party.
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