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NEWS
January 25, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trying to overcome what he called the "demonization" of his hard-line record, Israeli opposition leader Ariel Sharon told a U.S. audience Wednesday that he wants President Bush to participate in the Middle East peace process--as long as he doesn't pressure Israel to make concessions. The hawkish Sharon, who enjoys an overwhelming lead in opinion polls over caretaker Prime Minister Ehud Barak in advance of Israel's Feb.
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NEWS
January 25, 2001 | Associated Press
Israel, which suspended peace talks with the Palestinians after two Israelis were killed in the West Bank, has decided to resume the marathon negotiations this afternoon. The talks in the Egyptian resort of Taba will resume after the funeral today of the two Israelis, who are to be laid to rest in Haifa, according to a government statement released late Wednesday. The statement said talks will "continue for a few days" as Israel's Feb. 6 prime ministerial election approaches.
NEWS
January 25, 2001 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When nearly a quarter of a million Jews from Israel and around the world rallied here earlier this month, they hoped to demonstrate unified opposition to the notion that Israel might share sovereignty over this holy city with the Palestinians. Instead, the rally unleashed a storm of controversy over how much say Jews living outside Israel should have in Jerusalem's fate and how they should express their views.
NEWS
January 23, 2001 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As he coasts to what would seem to be certain victory in an upcoming election, Ariel Sharon's strategy has been to avoid mistakes. On Monday, however, the right-wing opposition leader found himself on the defensive. Sharon was dogged throughout the day by published comments in which he branded Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat a liar and a murderer.
NEWS
January 19, 2001 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ariel Sharon will offer no additional land to the Palestinians and will insist on maintaining all Jewish settlements in the West Bank and Gaza Strip if he is elected prime minister of Israel, according to a published report of his plans Thursday. The details of front-runner Sharon's plans, revealed for the first time, were immediately attacked by his rival in the Feb. 6 Israeli election, caretaker Prime Minister Ehud Barak. Palestinian officials decried them as a "recipe for war."
NEWS
January 13, 2001 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a success his opponents find infuriating, former Gen. Ariel Sharon, a hawk whom the world has long associated with Israel's wars, is selling himself to voters as a pragmatic statesman who will succeed where Prime Minister Ehud Barak has failed: as a peacemaker. Sharon has managed to shed the image of a loose cannon that has dogged him since he planned and executed Israel's invasion of Lebanon in 1982.
NEWS
January 5, 2001 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Caretaker Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak is increasingly isolated from the nation he leads as he prepares for a possible final push to sign a peace accord with the Palestinians before upcoming elections. Just last month, when Barak resigned, most pundits predicted that his only hope of winning reelection Feb. 6 lay in securing an agreement. Now it looks as if an accord, if it comes in the next couple of weeks, could be the final nail in his political coffin.
NEWS
December 22, 2000 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shimon Peres, Nobel peace laureate and perennial election loser, was handed yet another defeat Thursday when Israeli legislators blocked his attempt to run for prime minister in an upcoming special election. The architect of Israel's landmark peace process with the Palestinians was rebuffed by the leftist Meretz Party, whose members feared that supporting his candidacy would divide the so-called peace camp and hand victory to right-wing opposition leader Ariel Sharon.
NEWS
December 20, 2000 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It could well go down as one of the shortest political comebacks in history. Former Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu waltzed back onto the Israeli political stage just over a week ago, announcing he was here to save the day and recapture the leadership of a country on the brink of the abyss. Then, early Tuesday, deciding that Israel's upcoming election was not to his liking because it didn't include a vote for a new parliament, Netanyahu left the race before it began. But wait.
NEWS
December 19, 2000 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Benjamin Netanyahu quit the race for prime minister today, leaving former Gen. Ariel Sharon the main challenger to Ehud Barak in an election that could well determine the future of Middle East peacemaking. The Likud Party announced it was canceling its primaries today and uniting around the septuagenarian Sharon as its candidate.
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