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Israel Politics

NEWS
January 23, 2001 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As he coasts to what would seem to be certain victory in an upcoming election, Ariel Sharon's strategy has been to avoid mistakes. On Monday, however, the right-wing opposition leader found himself on the defensive. Sharon was dogged throughout the day by published comments in which he branded Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat a liar and a murderer.
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NEWS
January 19, 2001 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ariel Sharon will offer no additional land to the Palestinians and will insist on maintaining all Jewish settlements in the West Bank and Gaza Strip if he is elected prime minister of Israel, according to a published report of his plans Thursday. The details of front-runner Sharon's plans, revealed for the first time, were immediately attacked by his rival in the Feb. 6 Israeli election, caretaker Prime Minister Ehud Barak. Palestinian officials decried them as a "recipe for war."
NEWS
January 13, 2001 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a success his opponents find infuriating, former Gen. Ariel Sharon, a hawk whom the world has long associated with Israel's wars, is selling himself to voters as a pragmatic statesman who will succeed where Prime Minister Ehud Barak has failed: as a peacemaker. Sharon has managed to shed the image of a loose cannon that has dogged him since he planned and executed Israel's invasion of Lebanon in 1982.
NEWS
January 5, 2001 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Caretaker Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak is increasingly isolated from the nation he leads as he prepares for a possible final push to sign a peace accord with the Palestinians before upcoming elections. Just last month, when Barak resigned, most pundits predicted that his only hope of winning reelection Feb. 6 lay in securing an agreement. Now it looks as if an accord, if it comes in the next couple of weeks, could be the final nail in his political coffin.
NEWS
December 22, 2000 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shimon Peres, Nobel peace laureate and perennial election loser, was handed yet another defeat Thursday when Israeli legislators blocked his attempt to run for prime minister in an upcoming special election. The architect of Israel's landmark peace process with the Palestinians was rebuffed by the leftist Meretz Party, whose members feared that supporting his candidacy would divide the so-called peace camp and hand victory to right-wing opposition leader Ariel Sharon.
NEWS
December 20, 2000 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It could well go down as one of the shortest political comebacks in history. Former Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu waltzed back onto the Israeli political stage just over a week ago, announcing he was here to save the day and recapture the leadership of a country on the brink of the abyss. Then, early Tuesday, deciding that Israel's upcoming election was not to his liking because it didn't include a vote for a new parliament, Netanyahu left the race before it began. But wait.
NEWS
December 19, 2000 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Benjamin Netanyahu quit the race for prime minister today, leaving former Gen. Ariel Sharon the main challenger to Ehud Barak in an election that could well determine the future of Middle East peacemaking. The Likud Party announced it was canceling its primaries today and uniting around the septuagenarian Sharon as its candidate.
NEWS
December 11, 2000 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Launching his political comeback and perhaps a high-stakes legal battle as well, former Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu announced plans Sunday to challenge his old rival Ehud Barak in an election triggered by Barak's surprise resignation. A self-assured Netanyahu announced his candidacy for the prime minister's job in a nationally televised speech and news conference and said he is confident that legal obstacles that bar him from running will be overcome.
NEWS
December 10, 2000 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twelve days ago, Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak told associates that he was going before parliament to announce his resignation. He changed his mind at the last minute and instead called early general elections, saying it was the right and honorable thing to do to save the country. On Saturday night, Barak changed course again and shocked all of Israel by announcing that he would quit his post after all. What happened in 12 days?
NEWS
December 10, 2000 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak, looking haggard and grim, tossed his second bombshell in 12 days into the political arena Saturday night, announcing at a hastily called news conference that he will resign today and face a new election in 60 days.
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