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NEWS
February 7, 2001 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ariel Sharon's political survival, the future of Israeli-Palestinian peacemaking and even regional stability could hinge on the nature of the coalition that the prime minister-elect forges from the 17 squabbling parties that make up Israel's parliament.
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NEWS
February 7, 2001 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As far as Israel's Arab voters were concerned, Tuesday was payback time for all the wrongs they thought that Prime Minister Ehud Barak had committed against them during his short time in office. Even the specter of right-wing leader Ariel Sharon coming to power didn't keep them from helping to ensure that Barak's defeat was massive and humiliating.
NEWS
February 5, 2001 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When he swept to victory as Israeli prime minister 20 months ago, Ehud Barak went before thousands of cheering supporters in Tel Aviv's Rabin Square and announced the advent of "a new dawn." Now, it's dusk for Barak. Trailing by an apparently insurmountable deficit in polls ahead of Tuesday's election, Barak said Sunday that his right-wing opponents have succeeded in whipping public fear into a groundswell for ending his stay in office.
NEWS
February 4, 2001 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tuvia Metzer is the classic pro-peace Israeli leftist. Voting for the hard-line right wing is positively unthinkable for him. Yet when he deposits a ballot in Tuesday's election for incumbent Prime Minister Ehud Barak, it will be only after weeks of agonizing inner debate. "I will hold my heart and put 'Barak,' " Metzer says. Two days before Israel's national election, many of Barak's core supporters are facing the same dilemma.
NEWS
February 1, 2001 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 40 years, Ghazi Samara has been a Labor Party loyalist. But with just days to go before his country elects a new leader, the Arab citizen of Israel is agonizing: Should he vote for caretaker Prime Minister Ehud Barak, the party's candidate, or cast a blank protest ballot? "My father, he sold his cow once to buy votes around here for the Labor Party," said the 58-year-old Samara. "We were slaves for Labor.
NEWS
January 29, 2001 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The once-promising era of Middle East peacemaking under the auspices of Ehud Barak's current government came to a formal end Sunday night when Israel's caretaker prime minister suspended diplomatic contacts with the Palestinians. Barak halted contacts until after next week's election in Israel--a vote that all polls suggest Barak will lose to right-wing hawk Ariel Sharon.
NEWS
January 28, 2001 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Abandoned by supporters and crippled by opponents, caretaker Prime Minister Ehud Barak is waging a longshot battle for reelection, with virtually his only hope being that he can scare Israelis into voting for him. Barak, who swept decisively into office 20 months ago, today lags so far behind in polls that most Israelis believe the gap cannot be closed ahead of the Feb. 6 election. But he soldiers on, with the stubborn determination that has characterized his leadership and angered his allies.
NEWS
January 25, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trying to overcome what he called the "demonization" of his hard-line record, Israeli opposition leader Ariel Sharon told a U.S. audience Wednesday that he wants President Bush to participate in the Middle East peace process--as long as he doesn't pressure Israel to make concessions. The hawkish Sharon, who enjoys an overwhelming lead in opinion polls over caretaker Prime Minister Ehud Barak in advance of Israel's Feb.
NEWS
January 25, 2001 | Associated Press
Israel, which suspended peace talks with the Palestinians after two Israelis were killed in the West Bank, has decided to resume the marathon negotiations this afternoon. The talks in the Egyptian resort of Taba will resume after the funeral today of the two Israelis, who are to be laid to rest in Haifa, according to a government statement released late Wednesday. The statement said talks will "continue for a few days" as Israel's Feb. 6 prime ministerial election approaches.
NEWS
January 25, 2001 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When nearly a quarter of a million Jews from Israel and around the world rallied here earlier this month, they hoped to demonstrate unified opposition to the notion that Israel might share sovereignty over this holy city with the Palestinians. Instead, the rally unleashed a storm of controversy over how much say Jews living outside Israel should have in Jerusalem's fate and how they should express their views.
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