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WORLD
February 13, 2012 | By Edmund Sanders and Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
The technique had a familiar ring. A motorcyclist speeds toward a government vehicle, attaches a magnetic bomb and buzzes away moments before a fiery explosion. Last month, that's how an Iranian nuclear scientist was killed in Tehran. And on Monday, Indian officials said such an attack injured an Israeli diplomat's wife and three others in a well-guarded neighborhood of New Delhi near the Israeli Embassy. Israel and Iran are accusing each other of perpetrating the plots.
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WORLD
February 13, 2012 | By Edmund Sanders and Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
The technique had a familiar ring. A motorcyclist speeds toward a government vehicle, attaches a magnetic bomb and buzzes away moments before a fiery explosion. Last month, that's how an Iranian nuclear scientist was killed in Tehran. And on Monday, Indian officials said such an attack injured an Israeli diplomat's wife and three others in a well-guarded neighborhood of New Delhi near the Israeli Embassy. Israel and Iran are accusing each other of perpetrating the plots.
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NEWS
October 3, 1989 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
Yasser Arafat, chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization, told Japan bluntly Monday that it should curtail its trade with Israel. Arafat was asked to comment frankly on Japan's relations with the PLO, and he surprised a group of 100 guests at a question-and-answer session at the Foreign Ministry by saying: "You like frankness? I'll give you some frankness." Then he went on to say: "Recently, trade relations between Japan and Israel have expanded.
NATIONAL
June 28, 2008 | Janet Hook, Times Staff Writer
Barack Obama, as he introduces himself to the broader voting public, is emphasizing centrist -- even conservative -- positions on hot-button issues. In recent weeks, he toughened his stance on Iran and backed an expansion of the government's wiretapping powers. On Wednesday, he said states should be allowed to execute child rapists. When the Supreme Court the next day struck down the District of Columbia's ban on handguns, he did not complain.
BUSINESS
January 24, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Budget cuts at home and shrinking markets abroad under the effects of the Cold War thaw are forcing arms makers in Israel to convert to civilian production to avert an unparalleled business crisis. Swords-to-plowshares, tanks-to-toys planning among Israeli defense industries mirrors a process under way in the United States, where major contractors are diversifying and cutting back labor forces in response to reduced military spending.
BUSINESS
March 7, 1993 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jacob Frenkel, governor of the Bank of Israel, beams these days when he talks about his country's economy. Things, he says, are finally going right after years of high inflation, massive government spending, huge debts and poor productivity. "We are poised for a takeoff, and once it comes I think we will soar," Frenkel says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1993
Foreign companies seeking Los Angeles city contracts will be required to certify under penalty of perjury that they do not participate in the Arab boycott of Israel, under a program approved by the City Council Tuesday. The council last year voted to deny business to foreign firms that boycott Israel but did not set up a procedure to implement the policy until Tuesday. Federal law already prohibits U.S. companies from participating in the boycott, but foreign firms are free to do so.
NEWS
May 20, 1988
The Israeli Department of Antiquities has accused the State Department's chief legal adviser, Abraham D. Sofaer, of taking archeological artifacts out of Israel illegally and has begun negotiations with him for their return. Sofaer said he has been buying old coins from authorized dealers in Israel for about 10 years and none had ever told him he needed a license to export them.
BUSINESS
January 24, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Budget cuts at home and shrinking markets abroad under the effects of the Cold War thaw are forcing arms makers in Israel to convert to civilian production to avert an unparalleled business crisis. Swords-to-plowshares, tanks-to-toys planning among Israeli defense industries mirrors a process under way in the United States, where major contractors are diversifying and cutting back labor forces in response to reduced military spending.
WORLD
July 10, 2006 | Laura King, Times Staff Writer
With mourners chanting calls for vengeance, the funeral procession wound its way through dusty streets on Sunday, bearing the shrouded bodies of a Palestinian mother, her grown son and young daughter. Civilians are increasingly at risk in Israel's nearly 2-week-old military offensive in the Gaza Strip, which in recent days has encompassed the use of heavy battlefield weapons such as tanks, assault helicopters and artillery on the edges of densely populated neighborhoods.
WORLD
June 12, 2006 | Ken Ellingwood, Times Staff Writer
Two Hamas militants were killed in an Israeli airstrike Sunday in the northern Gaza Strip after the Palestinian group claimed responsibility for a rocket attack into southern Israel that left an Israeli man severely injured. Israel's military said its aircraft targeted fighters who were preparing to launch a Kassam rocket. Militants fired more than two dozen salvos during a day of stepped-up violence.
WORLD
December 6, 2004 | Ken Ellingwood, Times Staff Writer
Egypt released an Israeli man convicted of spying and Israel freed six Egyptian students Sunday in a prisoner swap viewed as a sign of warming relations between the two neighbors. Azzam Azzam, an Israeli Arab, crossed into Israel from Taba in the Sinai Peninsula after his release by Egyptian authorities. Azzam was sentenced to 15 years in prison after Egypt convicted him in 1997 of spying, a charge Israel denied for eight years as it sought his release.
WORLD
May 8, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Israeli jets hit suspected guerrilla positions in southern Lebanon after an artillery attack killed an Israeli soldier near the border -- the second exchange of fire in the area this week. The Lebanese foreign minister said the border situation was taking a "dangerous course." Two Israeli lawmakers urged a larger attack on Lebanon and its power broker, Syria.
NEWS
November 24, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
Thousands of triumphant Muslims on Tuesday unveiled a cornerstone for a mosque next to a major Christian shrine in the heart of Jesus' boyhood town--a ceremony that set off bitter recriminations between the Vatican and Israel. The Vatican said Israel, by allowing the mosque to be built, was "laying the foundation" for division. Israel hinted that the Holy See's protests were motivated in part by anti-Semitism.
BUSINESS
July 19, 1995 | From Bloomberg Business News
Fifty years after the end of World War II--and the Holocaust--Germany has evolved from being a pariah to Jews to become the second-largest industrial-goods trading partner of Israel, the Jewish state. Israeli companies in 1994 sold $846 million worth of goods to Germany, from Teva Pharmaceuticals Ltd.'s generic drugs to ECI Telecommunications Ltd.'s equipment to phosphates mined from the Dead Sea by Israel Chemicals Ltd. In return, Israelis imported $2.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1988 | BILL SING, Times Staff Writer
Bank of America said Friday that it has agreed to pay $220,000 to settle Commerce Department charges that it violated federal rules governing illegal trade boycotts with other countries. The fine is the largest ever for a U.S. bank involving the specific type of allegation directed at Bank of America, a Commerce Department spokesman said. The agency charged that the San Francisco-based bank violated certain Export Administration Act provisions. Those provisions prohibit U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1993
Foreign companies seeking Los Angeles city contracts will be required to certify under penalty of perjury that they do not participate in the Arab boycott of Israel, under a program approved by the City Council Tuesday. The council last year voted to deny business to foreign firms that boycott Israel but did not set up a procedure to implement the policy until Tuesday. Federal law already prohibits U.S. companies from participating in the boycott, but foreign firms are free to do so.
NEWS
June 9, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kuwait on Tuesday became the first Arab nation to announce that it is easing restrictions in a four-decade-old economic blockade of Israel, declaring that it will no longer blacklist foreign companies that do business with the Jewish state. Foreign Minister Sheik Sabah al Ahmed al Jabbar al Sabah said that other Arab states have agreed to follow suit. But Sabah said Kuwait will continue to abide by the Arab League's direct boycott of Israel, signed by 21 member countries in 1951.
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