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NEWS
December 20, 2013
Re “Group votes for a boycott,” Dec. 17 Russia invades Chechnya for the second Chechen war, causing up to 200,000 civilian casualties. After winning the war, it installs a repressive, corrupt government. Boycott? China takes over an entire country - Tibet - and floods it with ethnic Han and destroys a religion and culture. Boycott? After perusing a list of the world's dictatorships and even genocidal regimes, who do these “educators” decide to punish? The academics of a tiny, true democracy that just happens to be the only Jewish state on Earth.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 9, 2014 | By Steven L. Spiegel
There's a new industry in Washington, Jerusalem and Ramallah. It's called Kerry-bashing: The secretary of State never should have tried to bring about an Israeli-Palestinian deal; he wasted too much time; he's too soft on the Israelis or Palestinians or both; he needs to get on to other issues. Why the criticism? John F. Kerry has brought the peace process back into focus, he's dragged both sides into talks even though they were loath to make concessions, and he has altered the dialogue and perhaps even attained some concessions behind the scenes.
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OPINION
October 11, 2013 | By Dani Dayan
In the coming weeks or months Palestinians will likely put an end to the latest peace talks, just as they did in 2000 and 2008. Israel will of course be blamed; however, the reality will remain the same as it has been for the last 20 years: The so-called two-state solution is far from a solution but rather is a recipe for disaster. Even if by some miracle Secretary of State John F. Kerry and the U.S. administration are able to push through a historic compromise, it may only aggravate the conflict, creating an extremist and belligerent entity on the hills of Judea and Samaria (commonly referred to as the West Bank)
OPINION
April 5, 2014
Re "Jonathan Pollard's fate," Editorial, April 2 You argue that releasing Jonathan Pollard, the former intelligence worker who passed along secret information to Israel and was sentenced to life in prison, is a poor decision because it would set an "unseemly precedent. " You go on to argue that releasing Pollard would not have any real impact on Israeli-Palestinian peace talks. Both claims fail to see the urgency of the situation. Releasing Pollard would actually provide concrete incentives to Israel's very right-wing government by rewarding it for concessions.
WORLD
November 14, 2012 | By Edmund Sanders
JERUSALEM -- Retaliating for a recent barrage of rockets fired by Gaza Strip fighters, Israel on Wednesday killed a senior Hamas military commander as he traveled by car through Gaza City, the militant group said. Ahmed Jabari, the 52-year-old head of the Hamas military wing, and three other people in the vehicle were killed in the airstrike. Shortly after, Israeli forces also struck other targets in the seaside enclave. The attack marked the launch of a new Israeli military assault, dubbed Operation Pillar of Defense, aimed at “defending the people of Israel who have been under rocket attack and crippling terrorist organizations' capabilities,” said Israel Defense Forces spokesman Lt. Col. Avital Leibovitz.
WORLD
January 5, 2014 | By Batsheva Sobelman
Wrapping up three days of talks with Israeli and Palestinian leaders, U.S. Secretary of State John F. Kerry urged the officials to rise above the daily challenges and keep their eyes on the big picture. “We can achieve a permanent status agreement that results in two states for two peoples if we stay focused,” Kerry said before departing for Amman, Jordan, and Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, on Sunday. Kerry met twice separately with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas.
OPINION
September 15, 2010 | By Michael B. Oren
Imagine that you're a parent who sends her children off to school in the morning worrying whether their bus will become a target of suicide bombers. Imagine that, instead of going off to college, your children become soldiers at age 18, serve for three years and remain in the active reserves into their 40s. Imagine that you have fought in several wars, as have your parents and even your grandparents, that you've seen rockets raining down on your neighborhood and have lost close family and friends to terrorist attacks.
WORLD
June 15, 2010 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
With a sense of relief and a touch of anxiety, Israelis braced themselves Monday for another high-profile probe of their military's conduct. Relief stemmed from the hope that an Israeli-led commission, approved by the government Monday, will head off U.N. calls for an international inquiry into Israel's May 31 raid on an aid flotilla seeking to break its blockade of the Gaza Strip. Nine Turkish activists were killed in the operation. Anxiety persists, however, because recent inquiries into the military have led to political shake-ups and painful soul-searching.
WORLD
January 9, 2014 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM -- Palestinian protesters disrupted a citizens peace conference in Ramallah on Thursday, throwing stones at the meeting site until Palestinian Authority police were forced to intervene and usher the activists to safety. More than 20 Israelis and 30 Palestinians gathered in the City Inn hotel in the West Bank city for the first day of the Public Negotiating Congress, a grass-roots conference that brings citizens delegations from both sides together to negotiate an end to the decades-long conflict.
WORLD
February 12, 2013 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM -- As advance teams coordinate between Washington and Jerusalem over the agenda and itinerary of President Barack Obama's visit to Israel next month, politicians and media are full of speculation. Obama is coming to "save Israel from itself," according to one editorial , whose headline called the visit "better late than never. " One column suggested the visit was a "moment of truth" for Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. Other media reported the purpose of the visit was to guarantee "no surprises," such as an Israeli airstrike on Iran during U.S. efforts to negotiate.
WORLD
March 16, 2014 | By Kate Linthicum
BEIT HANOUN, Gaza Strip - When I first met Abdullah Alathamna four years ago, he was laid up at a children's hospital in Los Angeles, his right leg bound in a cast. He was pale, and grouchy from the pain pills. He was not at all interested in answering questions from a reporter. He was an 11-year-old kid, injured and without his family, more than 7,000 miles from his home in the northern Gaza Strip. The Palestinian youngster lost a foot in 2006 when the Israeli military accidentally shelled his house and several others while targeting militants who had launched rockets into Israel.
WORLD
March 12, 2014 | By Batsheva Sobelman and Rushdi Abu Alouf
JERUSALEM--In the heaviest barrage in more than a year, dozens of rockets were launched at southern Israel from the Gaza Strip on Wednesday, drawing condemnation from Israel's political leadership and swift retaliation by its military. At least 60 rockets and mortar shells were fired in rapid succession over a two-hour period. At least eight hit urban or open areas, according to Israel's army, while several others were intercepted by Israel's mobile air-defense system, Iron Dome.
WORLD
March 10, 2014 | By Maher Abukhater
RAMALLAH, West Bank -- Israeli soldiers shot and killed a Jordanian judge of Palestinian descent Monday at Allenby Bridge border crossing between the West Bank and Jordan, according to statements from the Israeli army and a Palestinian official. A statement by the Israel Defense Forces said the Jordanian -- identified as Raed Zeiter, 38, originally from the West Bank city of Nablus -- had just crossed the border from Jordan when he attempted to grab a soldier's weapon. The soldier opened fire and killed him. "A Palestinian tried to seize a soldier's weapon at the Allenby Bridge Crossing from Jordan,” the army tweeted on its account.
BUSINESS
March 9, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
Etihad Airways, the national airline of the United Arab Emirates, doesn't fly to Israel. In fact, the airline's online route map doesn't even show that Israel exists. The New York Post charged last week that the omission on the map is among several ways that Etihad discriminates against Israelis. In response, Etihad issued a statement, saying "we do not discriminate in any way and welcome passengers of all faiths and religions, carrying valid documentation. " Etihad, however, offered no explanation for the online map, which does not identify Israel by name but names its neighbors, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria and Egypt.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Sheri Linden
In "Bethlehem," Israel's submission to the recent Academy Awards for the foreign language Oscar, first-time filmmaker Yuval Adler views entrenched political tensions through the template of a police procedural. Focusing on an Israeli intelligence agent and one of his Palestinian informants, the movie has the taut efficiency of a well-constructed crime thriller, while its real-world underpinnings play out with a less convincing sense of urgency. Tsahi Halevy carries himself with a mournful, in-over-his-head demeanor as Razi, an officer in Israel's secret service who's trying to prevent an impending suicide bombing in Jerusalem.
WORLD
March 5, 2014 | By Batsheva Sobelman, This post has been updated. See the notes below for details.
JERUSALEM -- In a military operation in the international waters of the Red Sea, Israeli commandos intercepted a ship carrying Syrian-made rockets shipped from Iran and headed for the Gaza Strip, Israel's military announced Wednesday. According to Israeli army spokesman Motti Almoz , naval commandos boarded the ship about 950 miles from Israel without incident early Wednesday morning. Initial inspection of the cargo revealed dozens of M-302 rockets, concealed in containers covered with commercial-looking sacks of cement, Israeli officials said.
WORLD
March 7, 2013 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON  -- President Obama, who will make his first visit to Israel as president later this month, will challenge Israelis to make greater personal sacrifices for peace with the Palestinians, the president told leaders of Jewish organizations at the White House on Thursday. Obama has insisted that he will not try to pressure Israeli leaders during the visit. But he intends to exhort average Israelis to do more to reach an Israeli-Palestinian peace deal because it is in their own security interests, according to several people present.
OPINION
November 22, 2012
Re "A failed strategy," Opinion, Nov. 20 Israel's military response to Gaza is not a failed strategy because it is not a strategy at all. It is a tactic, a tactic to get Hamas to stop lobbing rockets into Israel. There is no long-term strategy that will prove successful until Hamas decides it is no longer interested in destroying Israel. Daoud Kuttab makes sure to mention that Palestinians fled or were forced from their homes in 1948. He does not mention that they fled because of the coordinated attack by Palestinian militias and Israel's Arab neighbors on the then-much smaller Jewish homeland.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Anthony York
MOUNTAIN VIEW -- Gov. Jerry Brown and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu came to the heart of the Silicon Valley on Wednesday and signed a deal that would promote trade and joint research between the Jewish state and California. The ceremony at the Computer History Museum was the latest international agreement signed by Brown, who led a trade mission to China last year and plans to take a delegation to Mexico this summer. The governor, a three-time failed presidential candidate who has said he will not be a candidate in 2016, said he will continue to forge accords with international leaders as an end-run around partisan gridlock in Washington, D.C. "California and Israel will build on their respective strengths in research and technology to confront critical problems we both face, such as water scarcity, cybersecurity and climate change," Brown said.
WORLD
March 3, 2014 | By Rushdi abu Alouf
GAZA CITY -- A Palestinian militant was killed in an Israeli airstrike Monday as he attempted to launch rockets at Israel from the northern Gaza Strip, authorities said. Mosaab Zaaneen, a 25-year-old Islamic Jihad fighter, died in the attack in the city of Beit Hanoun, according to a spokesman for the Hamas-run Health Ministry in Gaza. Three other people were injured, including an 11-year-old girl, the spokesman said. The Israeli military confirmed the strike in a statement. "The mission was carried out in order to eliminate an imminent attack targeting civilian communities of southern Israel," the Israel Defense Forces statement said.
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