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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1999 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was supposed to be a moment of catharsis for someone who has struggled for years to overcome the pain of rape. But the tearful woman could barely watch Thursday when her face flashed on the screen as part of a television campaign aimed at erasing the stigma felt by victims of sexual assault.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1999 | GREG KRIKORIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It does not get much tougher than this, letting the whole world know something so personal, so painful that you may not have shared it with friends, even family. But on Saturday morning, two dozen rape and molestation survivors assembled on a sound stage in Hollywood for an event that they hope will strip away the notion that they--and millions of others nationwide--are just victims.
NEWS
February 10, 1999 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A state advisory board urged Tuesday that Gov. Gray Davis unleash tough new television ads aimed at the tobacco industry--including some the Pete Wilson administration refused to air. The Tobacco Education and Research Oversight Committee, made up primarily of appointees of the state Legislature and former Gov. Wilson, is also calling on Davis to give swift approval to a new batch of anti-tobacco billboards to replace what now are tobacco ads.
NEWS
January 31, 1999 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Worried that segments of the U.S. population may not fully participate in the 2000 census, federal officials are mounting an ambitious $100-million advertising campaign to sell racial and ethnic minorities on the benefits of being counted. Young & Rubicam Inc., a giant New York advertising agency, is crafting an overall media campaign--"This is your future. Don't leave it blank!"--to encourage all Americans to fill out and return the mail-in census forms.
NEWS
November 10, 1998 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Justice Department investigators questioned President Clinton for 90 minutes Monday, looking into potential violations of campaign finance laws. Atty. Gen. Janet Reno has until Dec. 7 to determine whether to seek the appointment of an independent counsel to investigate whether Clinton's 1996 reelection campaign exceeded federal spending limits.
NEWS
October 17, 1998 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fearful of projecting an anti-business image, the Wilson administration has barred negative portrayals of tobacco executives in anti-smoking commercials produced for the state, according to an ad agency executive who testified Friday that words such as "lies" and "liars" have been declared taboo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1998 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A majority of teenagers in Los Angeles County say they don't believe there is any risk in trying the drug methamphetamine once or twice. That's one of the unsettling findings of a survey to be released today by the Partnership for a Drug-Free America at a Universal City hotel. The study's results spurred a new anti-methamphetamine advertising campaign aimed at teenagers. Teenagers' use of methamphetamine, also known as speed, is not high.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1998 | TOM SCHULTZ
Animation industry professionals have honored students from 12 Valley middle schools for work on an ad campaign against smoking. In an annual event held Thursday at UCLA's Wadsworth Theater, officials from the Los Angeles Unified School District joined representatives from AnimAction, a Los Angeles-based company that provides animation programs to schools and communities, in honoring the students.
NEWS
May 8, 1998 | MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the beginning, smoking is about image. Three thousand American teens will light up for the first time today and, for most, says 17-year-old Alexandria Drouin, "it's like, 'I want to look cool.' " But what would happen if young smokers saw themselves not as cool, but as targets? As pawns, cynically manipulated in a corporate chess game? What if the brand they chose was not Marlboro or Camel but Truth?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1998 | DEBRA CANO
For the past 20 years, Anaheim firefighter Fernando Negrete had a mustache and full head of black hair. But that changed Monday when Negrete and more than 100 other firefighters--including the fire chief--shaved their heads for a good cause: to support co-worker Bobby Cournoyer, 34, who lost his hair after treatments for leukemia. Negrete and others even shaved their mustaches to help raise awareness about the disease and need for bone-marrow donors.
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