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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1999 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG and JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Natural Resources Defense Council sued the MTA on Thursday in a dispute over the placement of "full-wrap" bus ads warning the public about the hazards of diesel bus fumes. In a Los Angeles federal court lawsuit, the council accused the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and its advertising agency of trying to exercise unconstitutional control over the content of the proposed ad.
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BUSINESS
April 22, 1999 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A billboard that on Friday will replace the famous Marlboro Man advertisement that has stood high above the Sunset Strip for 17 years is a sign of the times. The larger-than-life cowboy still wears the familiar white hat and blue denim jacket. But the ever-present cigarette is limp, and the eight-letter word in the familiar red typeface reads "impotent," a reference to medical research linking tobacco use and male impotency.
NEWS
March 20, 1999 | MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even as state lawmakers squabble about funding for Florida's innovative program to cut teen smoking, a survey of 20,000 middle school and high school students suggests the edgy, guerrilla-style advertising campaign has worked. Smoking rates among teenagers have declined by more than 2% in the last year, the state health department survey found.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1999 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was supposed to be a moment of catharsis for someone who has struggled for years to overcome the pain of rape. But the tearful woman could barely watch Thursday when her face flashed on the screen as part of a television campaign aimed at erasing the stigma felt by victims of sexual assault.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1999 | GREG KRIKORIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It does not get much tougher than this, letting the whole world know something so personal, so painful that you may not have shared it with friends, even family. But on Saturday morning, two dozen rape and molestation survivors assembled on a sound stage in Hollywood for an event that they hope will strip away the notion that they--and millions of others nationwide--are just victims.
NEWS
February 10, 1999 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A state advisory board urged Tuesday that Gov. Gray Davis unleash tough new television ads aimed at the tobacco industry--including some the Pete Wilson administration refused to air. The Tobacco Education and Research Oversight Committee, made up primarily of appointees of the state Legislature and former Gov. Wilson, is also calling on Davis to give swift approval to a new batch of anti-tobacco billboards to replace what now are tobacco ads.
NEWS
January 31, 1999 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Worried that segments of the U.S. population may not fully participate in the 2000 census, federal officials are mounting an ambitious $100-million advertising campaign to sell racial and ethnic minorities on the benefits of being counted. Young & Rubicam Inc., a giant New York advertising agency, is crafting an overall media campaign--"This is your future. Don't leave it blank!"--to encourage all Americans to fill out and return the mail-in census forms.
NEWS
November 10, 1998 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Justice Department investigators questioned President Clinton for 90 minutes Monday, looking into potential violations of campaign finance laws. Atty. Gen. Janet Reno has until Dec. 7 to determine whether to seek the appointment of an independent counsel to investigate whether Clinton's 1996 reelection campaign exceeded federal spending limits.
NEWS
October 17, 1998 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fearful of projecting an anti-business image, the Wilson administration has barred negative portrayals of tobacco executives in anti-smoking commercials produced for the state, according to an ad agency executive who testified Friday that words such as "lies" and "liars" have been declared taboo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1998 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A majority of teenagers in Los Angeles County say they don't believe there is any risk in trying the drug methamphetamine once or twice. That's one of the unsettling findings of a survey to be released today by the Partnership for a Drug-Free America at a Universal City hotel. The study's results spurred a new anti-methamphetamine advertising campaign aimed at teenagers. Teenagers' use of methamphetamine, also known as speed, is not high.
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