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NEWS
April 23, 2000 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With no small amount of flourish, Gov. Gray Davis convened a news conference nearly a year ago to declare that he was renewing California's war on tobacco use by launching a series of tough television ads attacking the industry. "It's time," Davis proclaimed last May, "for this state to stand up for our children against the Joe Camels and Marlboro Men, and other seductive messages of addiction. Our ads will tell the truth in a plain, unvarnished fashion."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2000 | JOHNATHON E. BRIGGS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Banners with words and images confronting stereotypes and promoting diversity and respect were unveiled Thursday morning outside Grant High School, where ethnic tensions erupted in violence last year and students signed a "peace treaty" in January.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2000 | JOHNATHON E. BRIGGS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Banners with words and images confronting stereotypes and promoting diversity and respect were unveiled Thursday morning outside Grant High School, where ethnic tensions erupted in violence last year and a "peace treaty" was signed by students in January.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 2000 | ANN L. KIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chances are your daily routine includes getting stuck in traffic or idling at a red light, all somewhere within sight of a billboard. And that's exactly what Silver Lake artist Janeil Engelstad is banking on. Through her project, "Visualizing Violence," she's hoping motorists in six locations throughout Los Angeles will look up and focus on billboard art that decries how easy it is for young people to acquire guns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 2000 | KARIMA A. HAYNES and ANN L. KIM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Disraely Ramirez was angry and sad when he heard a news story that a young boy had been killed by a stray bullet. The 17-year-old junior at Belmont High School in Los Angeles took matters into his own hands by creating an anti-gun-violence message for a billboard on Canoga Avenue near Roscoe Boulevard. Disraely's design is one of six billboards created by teens in the Visualizing Violence LA project, which provides young artists with a platform to explore gun violence.
NEWS
January 14, 2000 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White House Office of National Drug Control Policy is under fire for a controversial strategy said to have financially rewarded television networks for incorporating anti-drug messages into such shows as "ER" and "Chicago Hope." The unorthodox arrangement, detailed in the online news service Salon, has raised awkward questions about whether broadcasters changed story lines in an effort to spare themselves from allocating valuable air time to free public-service spots.
BUSINESS
October 11, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Television ads have recently popped up in Los Angeles and San Francisco asking government regulators to keep their hands off the Internet. Behind the ads is a Washington-based group--fittingly called Hands Off the Internet--that describes itself as "a coalition of Net users united in the belief that the Internet's phenomenal growth stems from the ability of entrepreneurs to expand consumer choices and opportunities without worrying about government regulation."
BUSINESS
September 18, 1999 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Newspaper advertisements in which a California research institute supported Microsoft Corp.'s position in its antitrust trial were actually paid for by the software giant, the company and the institute acknowledged Friday. The full-page ads, which appeared in the New York Times and the Washington Post in June, were presented as the unbiased conclusions of the Independent Institute, an Oakland-based think tank, even though Microsoft paid the bulk of the advertising cost.
NEWS
August 18, 1999 | From Associated Press
President Clinton introduced three public service announcements Tuesday that urged parents to talk with their children about violence. "Our children need our help to deal with tough issues like violence. Please talk with your kids," Clinton says in one of the spots. Clinton used an event announcing the ads to renew his call for new gun control laws. No law can stop every madman with a gun, he said, but sensible gun control will save lives and make children safer at school.
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