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July 7, 1995 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opponents of Benetton's controversial "shock advertising" campaign won a round Thursday, when a German appeals court ruled that three of the Italian clothing company's commercial images could not be published in this country.
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BUSINESS
January 27, 2010 | By Meg James
CBS Corp., acknowledging Tuesday that it has changed its policy and now accepts commercials that advocate political causes, defended its decision to run a politically sensitive advertisement during next month's Super Bowl. The thicket that CBS finds itself in could become increasingly common for TV networks and local stations. Last week the U.S. Supreme Court lifted a decades-old prohibition that prevented corporations from buying ads and financing candidates and campaigns. Now media analysts are predicting that as much as $500 million in corporate money could flood this year's political campaigns, unleashing a torrent of issue advertising that will force TV executives to weigh the ever-shifting debate about which commercials cross the line.
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NEWS
November 10, 1998 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Justice Department investigators questioned President Clinton for 90 minutes Monday, looking into potential violations of campaign finance laws. Atty. Gen. Janet Reno has until Dec. 7 to determine whether to seek the appointment of an independent counsel to investigate whether Clinton's 1996 reelection campaign exceeded federal spending limits.
BUSINESS
September 14, 2001 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The commercial that ran Wednesday night on one New York City television station represented every advertiser's worst nightmare. The spot promoting a television series showed a model wedged between the now-destroyed World Trade Center towers. "That's just outrageous," said Mark Morris, chairman of Bates North America, a New York advertising agency. "Someone should have said, 'Oh, my God, stop that.' It never should have happened."
BUSINESS
January 27, 2010 | By Meg James
CBS Corp., acknowledging Tuesday that it has changed its policy and now accepts commercials that advocate political causes, defended its decision to run a politically sensitive advertisement during next month's Super Bowl. The thicket that CBS finds itself in could become increasingly common for TV networks and local stations. Last week the U.S. Supreme Court lifted a decades-old prohibition that prevented corporations from buying ads and financing candidates and campaigns. Now media analysts are predicting that as much as $500 million in corporate money could flood this year's political campaigns, unleashing a torrent of issue advertising that will force TV executives to weigh the ever-shifting debate about which commercials cross the line.
BUSINESS
September 14, 2001 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The commercial that ran Wednesday night on one New York City television station represented every advertiser's worst nightmare. The spot promoting a television series showed a model wedged between the now-destroyed World Trade Center towers. "That's just outrageous," said Mark Morris, chairman of Bates North America, a New York advertising agency. "Someone should have said, 'Oh, my God, stop that.' It never should have happened."
BUSINESS
May 18, 2008 | DAVID LAZARUS, CONSUMER CONFIDENTIAL
What if I offered to sell you an ordinary quarter for 60 cents? You'd tell me to . . . well, I can't print what you'd probably tell me to do. So what are we to make of a company called World Reserve Monetary Exchange, which recently took out full-page ads in this paper and elsewhere offering rolls of 50 $1 coins for $124? That's about $2.50 for each $1 coin.
BUSINESS
January 3, 1998 | Bloomberg News
Brown & Williamson, a unit of BAT Industries in Britain, paid a $100,000 fine imposed by a Minnesota judge for failing to turn over papers from its American Tobacco unit. In a letter with the check, Louisville-based Brown & Williamson said it isn't waiving its right to appeal the fine, which was ordered by Ramsey County District Court Judge Kenneth Fitzpatrick. Brown & Williamson made the payment several days ahead of the court's 10-day deadline.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1998
It's now or never for campaign finance reform. Never, that is, as far as the 105th Congress is concerned. Buoyed by House passage of a reform bill in August, Sens. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Russell Feingold (D-Wis.) are pursuing one more attempt to pass their own measure, as early as Thursday. Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott (R-Miss.) opposes reform but has agreed to a final vote on the measure. McCain and Feingold got the support of 50 other senators the last time the bill came up.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1995
The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors voted Tuesday to draft a letter of protest to the Telemundo television network for airing distilled liquor advertisements that some fear are aimed at young Latinos.
NEWS
November 10, 1998 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Justice Department investigators questioned President Clinton for 90 minutes Monday, looking into potential violations of campaign finance laws. Atty. Gen. Janet Reno has until Dec. 7 to determine whether to seek the appointment of an independent counsel to investigate whether Clinton's 1996 reelection campaign exceeded federal spending limits.
NEWS
July 7, 1995 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opponents of Benetton's controversial "shock advertising" campaign won a round Thursday, when a German appeals court ruled that three of the Italian clothing company's commercial images could not be published in this country.
BUSINESS
December 28, 1990 | JANE APPLEGATE
Money. Money. Money. These are the top three concerns among America's small-business owners as we begin the new year. But there are other things that entrepreneurs ought to keep in mind as they head into 1991, including how to locate and hold on to employees. Staying on top of these two issues can help small businesses to flourish in lean times. Earlier this year, small-business owners began hearing about the "credit crunch."
NEWS
September 3, 1996 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As free safety on the Cornell University football team, Peter S. Knight led the Ivy League in interceptions in 1972. He also set a school record for punt returns in one game--eight against Princeton. His specialty, it seemed, was securing the ball for the Cornell offense. He has much the same job today as manager of the Clinton-Gore reelection campaign. If the GOP starts to move, Knight's assignment is to help get the momentum back to the White House. That suits the unobtrusive Knight just fine.
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