Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsItabari Njeri
IN THE NEWS

Itabari Njeri

FEATURED ARTICLES
BOOKS
February 25, 1990 | Gail Lumet Buckley, Buckley is author of a family memoir , "The Hornes" (Alfred A. Knopf). She is currently writing a book on the African-American military experience. and
The title of this collection of nonfiction stories linked mostly by family relationships (a first book that began as fiction but ended as "literal truth") comes from an African-American proverb: "Every shut-eye ain't sleep; every good-bye ain't gone."
ARTICLES BY DATE
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1991
T imes staff writer Itabari Njeri's commentary on Spike Lee's film "Jungle Fever" ("Doing the Wrong Thing," June 23) has prompted an outpouring from readers, with responses supporting Lee outnumbering those supporting Njeri about 2 to 1. A sampling: A Meaningful Critique Thank God and Itabari Njeri for a meaningful critique of the mean-spirited and racist "Jungle Fever." I am infuriated by the white press's adoration of Lee. Her more complex understanding of black-white love--as love --uplifted me and made me want to say, "Hey, Spike.
MAGAZINE
July 12, 1992
In "Words to Live or Die By" (May 31), Itabari Njeri implies that the real cause of the L.A. riots (or "riots," as she would have it) was actually a lack of political correctness, and that the way to prevent any future problems of the sort is to employ less "oppressive" language. Allow me to offer some suggestions for the healing process: Looters should henceforth be referred to as "Acquisitional-Americans." So-called "thugs," actually being cause-motivated and oppressed freedom fighters, should from now on be called "Sado-Americans" so as not to distract from their righteous struggle.
NEWS
April 9, 1989
Re "Intercultural Etiquette" (by Itabari Njeri, April 2), I am an American of Japanese descent and I have been called an Oriental, Asian-American, Japanese-American and a Sansei (third generation Japanese-American). I have also been asked if I was Japanese, Chinese or Korean and whether I knew judo, karate or could make sukiyaki (yes to all three). Am I offended by these labels and questions? Not in the very least. The term racist is overused, especially by political groups against their opponents in heated campaigns.
NEWS
June 1, 1990
Itabari Njeri, a Times staff writer in the View section, was lauded at the American Book Awards for her new book, "Every Good-bye Ain't Gone." The much-praised portrait of Njeri's own diverse and unusual family was one of almost two dozen works cited Thursday night by judges for making an "outstanding contribution to American literature."
MAGAZINE
May 28, 1989
Regarding "Fresh Talk," by Itabari Njeri (April 16): I invite Arsenio Hall's critics to consider how, historically, television has made black audiences feel excluded by the jargon, interests, life styles and values portrayed by typical programming. With the shoe on the other foot, perhaps some people will realize how it feels to be on the outside looking in. I applaud Arsenio's real message: that the dividing line between "in" and "out" is the degree to which we are willing to risk caring about one another.
NEWS
May 1, 1988
Itabari Njeri has stirred up a hornet's nest. The article serves no good purpose. It has no redeeming qualities. Afro-Americans are multicolored, multicultured, non-monolithic race and should be accepted and respected as such. What we had better do is place more emphasis on our Americanism, because we are losing it--losing it, Ms. Njeri, while others who want to be Americans are making far more progress than we are. A. S. DOC YOUNG Los Angeles
NEWS
October 21, 1988
I was somewhat amused by the article in View about Martha Pulliam, Dan Quayle's grandmother, and about his comment during the debate that she said you can do anything you set your mind to work for ("Quayle's a Delight to His Wealthy, Whistlin' 'Nana,' " by Itabari Njeri, Oct. 10). I'm not surprised that she couldn't specifically remember the advice she gave her grandson. I think rather she might have told him he could do anything he sets his mind to pay for. I'm sure he had as little identity with the working people then as he has now. WOODY McBREAIRTY Los Angeles
NEWS
July 3, 1988
The article "A Sense of Identity" (by Itabari Njeri, June 5) was an excellent review of the issues interracial children deal with. Growing up in an interracial family, I have seen how one is forced to choose between belonging to the black culture or the white culture. The choice is demanded by a racist society in which individuals feel they must categorize people by race to understand them. More and more people in this country are interracial. If the government would acknowledge this with a new racial category, this would be an excellent beginning to the end of racial stereotyping.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1992
Itabari Njeri ("The Chauvinism We Hate Isn't Our Path, Either," Commentary, Feb. 28) is the latest in a stream of black apologists and white conservatives who have attacked Afrocentricity in virtually every respected news medium in this country. The advocates of Afrocentricity have been given few, if any, opportunities to defend their points of view. The foundation of this emerging school of academic and political thought is not "Black Nationalism" but rather concrete and verifiable facts that much of the Western academic Establishment has chosen to suppress, distort or ignore.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1991
In his letter July 21, as part of the continuing discussion of Itabari Njeri's critique of Spike Lee, Jack Chansler said I was attempting in my earlier letter to "absolve slavery in America." I do not believe that two wrongs make a right. My intention--in saying that blacks made slaves of blacks--was to point out that many of the problems in the black community are caused by and can be solved by itself. And that history shows that the guilt for our racial problems should be shared.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1991
T imes staff writer Itabari Njeri's commentary on Spike Lee's film "Jungle Fever" ("Doing the Wrong Thing," June 23) has prompted an outpouring from readers, with responses supporting Lee outnumbering those supporting Njeri about 2 to 1. A sampling: The Artist as Role Model Is it necessary for Njeri to inflict such savage commentary upon Lee? It is true that there are those who disagree with his approach and point of view. But there are also those who admire Lee as a cultural hero who has succeeded in a field that has been traditionally closed to blacks.
NEWS
November 4, 1990
Just as I concluded that common sense, creativity, and intelligence didn't get printed much west of the Mississippi River, Itabari Njeri presents two great articles of enlightenment in one Times View issue. Why? What? Is this California culture-- without sand? On Oct. 19, "A City of Poets: L.A. Emerges as a Place of Verse, Diversity" on the Los Angeles Poetry Festival and "The Compelling Stories of a Conquered Nation," an overview of the life of UCLA professor, Paula Gunn Allen, appeared.
NEWS
December 26, 1986
Re "Man of Few Words Has His Language Skills Down Pat" by Itabari Njeri (Dec. 11): I am very familiar with All Peoples Christian Center and Church, and I've never read a story that captured the truth and essence and spirit of a place and its people so well. It was really amazing to read that article--it was just like being there, in the heart of the place; she caught everything and everyone, down to the turn of Martha Suzuki's head. Anyone could read that story and know exactly what All Peoples is like, just what it feels like to be there.
NEWS
November 4, 1990
Just as I concluded that common sense, creativity, and intelligence didn't get printed much west of the Mississippi River, Itabari Njeri presents two great articles of enlightenment in one Times View issue. Why? What? Is this California culture-- without sand? On Oct. 19, "A City of Poets: L.A. Emerges as a Place of Verse, Diversity" on the Los Angeles Poetry Festival and "The Compelling Stories of a Conquered Nation," an overview of the life of UCLA professor, Paula Gunn Allen, appeared.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|