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NEWS
January 15, 2001 | ADAM BREGMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Though it may be hard to imagine in America, in Italy, communists, anarchists, ravers, punks, hackers and artists have seized vast, abandoned factories and forts and boarded-up schools and churches and transformed them into cinemas, concert halls, bars, squats and art galleries. Far from being decrepit pits, Italy's social centers are among the country's most vital cultural institutions.
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NEWS
May 21, 2012 | By David Ng
The magnitude 6.0 earthquake that hit northern Italy early Sunday has claimed the lives of six people and has caused widespread damage. Among the most badly hit sites were a number of cultural heritage structures, according to reports. Italy's cultural ministry said that "after an initial survey, damage to cultural patrimony appears significant. " One of the hardest hit areas was San Felice sul Panaro, a town near Bologna, which saw serious damage to a 14th century castle and to churches that housed valuable paintings and frescoes.
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NEWS
August 7, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faithful to a summer tradition of urban flight and seaside frolic that dates to Caesar's day, Italy is closed this month. And once again during these sweltering dog days, it is the dogs who suffer most. The annual August divorce between 60 million Italians and their cities is accompanied again this year by rampant dog abandonment that kills not only dogs but also people. There's a saying in Italy about dogs: "Under the tree at Christmas, onto the highway in August."
NEWS
January 15, 2001 | ADAM BREGMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Though it may be hard to imagine in America, in Italy, communists, anarchists, ravers, punks, hackers and artists have seized vast, abandoned factories and forts and boarded-up schools and churches and transformed them into cinemas, concert halls, bars, squats and art galleries. Far from being decrepit pits, Italy's social centers are among the country's most vital cultural institutions.
SPORTS
July 8, 1990 | MIKE DOWNEY
Italy has me moonstruck. There is more than mere inanimate beauty here, more than just statuary of rippling-muscled men and canvas portraits of ripe, round women. There are flesh-and-blood Italian people, very much alive, offering you a helping hand when not needing it to converse, pointing a finger toward a breathtakingly beautiful spire or steeple when not using it to pick your pocket.
SPORTS
June 19, 1990 | JULIE CART
The sun shines most of the time. What rain there is brings a welcome cool. In the late, lazy afternoons a mist forms on the Arno and the river itself seems to rise and shroud the city's graceful bridges. Embraced by Florence's serene beauty and calm it is difficult to comprehend the actions of soccer hooligans in Cagliari and Milan. Or the rampage of basketball fans that left seven dead in Detroit last week.
NEWS
July 12, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Italian automaker Fiat is now in the same league as Nissan of Japan, academically speaking. It has pledged $1.1 million to keep Italian studies alive at Oxford University, officials say. Since 1979, Nissan has funded the chair in modern Japanese studies at Britain's oldest university, which has been hurt by cuts in government grants.
NEWS
January 13, 1990
After reading the article (Jan. 4) which told about the offer of $60 million and a new stadium to Al Davis and his Raiders (which incidentally seems to me to be an appropriate name), I was all set just to write "Let Al Davis go to Sacramento, Oakland or wherever so that we can keep our Coliseum as is.
SPORTS
June 13, 1990 | Mike Downey
No, you dumb American, the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel was not painted by Michael Landon. No, you dumb American, you do not wish to order a peanut butter-and-gelato sandwich. No, you dumb American, soccer fans do not get up from their seats to take a 70th-minute stretch. Even for someone of Italian descent, there is much to learn, much to learn. Hey, I can't help it if I thought Maradona was a blonde woman singer on tour. I'm new around here.
SPORTS
June 28, 1990 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Monzialismo Ti Uccide . An Italian graffiti artist spray-painted that cry for help on several stone walls in Florence. It means, "The World Cup Is Killing Me." Americans would advise him to call 911, but telephones are among the utilities taken for granted at home that cannot always be counted on in Italy. Electricity and water are others. One Saturday afternoon in Florence, a rumor spread that the water would be cut off for 24 hours beginning at midnight.
TRAVEL
July 23, 2000 | GWEN O'SULLIVAN ROMAGNOLI, Gwen O'Sullivan Romagnoli is a freelance writer who recently returned to Boston after a six-month stay in Italy
Once you've fed the body, the Romans like to say, you're ready to feed the soul. Perhaps that's why a four-day trip that began as a quest for the perfect Parmesan and the most aromatic prosciutto turned into a veritable cultural feast of virtuosos and Verdi and violins. Our fertile hunting ground for these pursuits was the Emilia-Romagna region of Northern Italy. South of Lombardy and north of Tuscany, it occupies the valley formed by the Po River between the Apennines and the Adriatic Sea.
TRAVEL
April 5, 1998 | BRIGITTE BERTROU SELIGMAN, Seligman is a Santa Barbara-based freelance writer
My husband Mischa and I zipped through the undulating Tuscan countryside in our rented apple green Opel. Suddenly in the luminous dusk, the red stone abbey of Monte Olivetto Maggiore soared out of the groves of pine, oaks and olives. After parking the car, we walked up to the monastery, one of Tuscany's most beautifully situated, eager to hear the Benedictine monks' Gregorian vespers, which wafted through the abbey's portal.
NEWS
January 25, 1998 | ANNE BEATTS, Anne Beatts is a writer who lives in Hollywood
This just in: The latest estimates from Italy's National Institute of Population Research indicate that at the current rate of population decline, 150 years from now there will be no more Italians. To some people, that might be cause for rejoicing. F. Scott Fitzgerald, for instance. He once said, "I now know why the French love France so much--I have seen Italy."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1997 | KARIMA A. HAYNES
Lucy Ricardo has nothing on Emilio Bellissimo. The owner, chef and impresario of Cafe Bellissimo staged a grape stomping event Sunday evening that rivaled the zany redhead's antics in the classic "I Love Lucy" episode. Bellissimo donned a floppy chef's hat, washed his feet with rubbing alcohol and water and jumped into a kiddie pool "vat" of Italian muscatel and Concord grapes. "C'mon everybody! Jump in!
NEWS
July 25, 1992 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After Don Paolino Bontate, one of the last traditional Mafia bosses of Palermo, died in his sleep in 1974, hundreds of citizens attended his funeral Mass. A newspaper reporter present in the Santo Curato d'Ars Church wrote that at least 500 people filed past the solid walnut coffin to kiss the cheek of Bontate's eldest son, Stefano.
NEWS
March 10, 1992 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a winter's morning of bright sunshine, everything moves in the Piazza Venezia. And nothing does. The piazza is the heart of Rome. Histrionic yet cryptic, a metaphor for the Eternal City. Renaissance popes lived here. From a piazza balcony, Mussolini hectored crowds into a tragic fling with fascism. At the head of the piazza, 19th-Century Romans built a huge white marble wedding cake memorial to King Victor Emmanuel II, first ruler of a modern, united Italy.
SPORTS
July 10, 1990 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bread and circuses. That's what the Roman patricians used to rely on to keep the plebeian masses in order. Things haven't changed much in 2,000 years. The bread is still bread, but the circus is now called calcio , or soccer. Italians have taken to the sport like no other people on earth. It has become part of the fabric of society, as vital a component as its literature, art and music, its fine food and even finer wine.
NEWS
September 13, 1989 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
Lunch is pasta alla napoletana , roast chicken and an apple. Like the food, the cooks and the servers are Italian, but the 1,300 guests at the daily free meal have barely a buon giorno among them. The diners eat quickly, with gusto, in a basement soup kitchen near the palace where Nero once celebrated decadent diversions in ancient Rome.
NEWS
February 14, 1992 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 60, Gay Talese has finally decided to understand--but not forgive--his immigrant father. Like so many stories of fathers and sons, this one is about guilt and a grudge. Growing up during World War II, young Gay learned what it meant to live a double life. Outsiders viewed his dad, Joseph, as a hard-working tailor and a patriot. But in the privacy of his Ocean City, N.J., home, the old man grieved over relatives fighting for Italy against American troops. One morning, he snapped.
NEWS
October 29, 1991 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was just after dawn on an October morning in the Montmorency Forest north of Paris. The stands of oak and chestnut trees were still shrouded in mist. Earthy, pungent vapors rose from the ferns and soft humus on the forest floor. Suddenly a man in tie and business suit, his trouser legs rolled up to his knees, burst into the open from a narrow trail. Startled by a stranger on his dawn mission, he held up a wicker basket by way of explanation.
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